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Author Topic: Teak Veneer decking  (Read 4752 times)

Nordlys

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Teak Veneer decking
« on: November 08, 2012, 09:58:42 AM »

Hi,
I have in mind to cover the plywood deck of my recently built MS Dolphin
with a sheet form, Teak veneer wood, not planks.
Has anybody ever used Teak before and could anyone enlighten
me on a suitable finish, for teak, which would be waterproof please?
 
Nordlys...
 
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Tug-Kenny

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2012, 11:22:10 AM »


Doesn't teak have to be oiled ?

My wife does this on our table and the wood looks quite shiny and grainy.

regards

Ken


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DickyD

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2012, 11:38:46 AM »

Doesn't teak have to be oiled ?

My wife does this on our table and the wood looks quite shiny and grainy.

regards

Ken
You're right Ken. Teak is a naturally oily timber and although you can varnish it linseed oil is thought to be best.


In some applications the teak is actually left untreated as it is protected by its own oil. 
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essex2visuvesi

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2012, 11:46:03 AM »

In one of the books I have I have it does say that teak is not really suitable to model ship building
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DickyD

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2012, 11:51:17 AM »

In one of the books I have I have it does say that teak is not really suitable to model ship building
Odd seeing as how it is used in 1:1 scale ships, though possibly not so much nowadays as it is not a sustainable timber.




Holystoning the teak deck of the USS Missouri.


http://www.eugeneleeslover.com/VIDEOS/USS_Missouri_holystoning.html
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Tug-Kenny

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2012, 12:04:16 PM »


Isn't Teak one of the woods that does Not float ?


ken

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DickyD

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2012, 12:19:46 PM »

Interesting read.


Uses in BoatbuildingTeak has been used as a boatbuilding material for over 150 years. In addition to relatively high strength, teak is also highly resistant to rot, fungi and mildew. In addition, teak has a relatively low shrinkage ratio, which makes it excellent for applications where it undergoes periodic changes in moisture. Teak has the unusual properties of being both an excellent structural timber for framing, planking, etc., while at the same time being easily worked and finished to a high degree. For this reason, it is also prized for the trim work on boat interiors. It is also relatively easy to work, unlike some other similar woods such as purpleheart. Due to the oily nature of the wood, care must be taken to properly prepare the wood before gluing.When used on boats, teak is also very flexible in the finishes that may be applied. One option is to use no finish at all, in which case the wood will naturally weather to a pleasing silver-grey. The wood may also be oiled with a finishing agent such as linseed or tung oil. This results in a pleasant, somewhat bland finish. Finally, teak may also be varnished for a deep, lustrous glow.Teak is also used extensively in boat decks, as it is extremely durable and requires very little maintenance. The teak tends to wear in to the softer 'summer' growth bands first, forming a natural 'non-slip' surface. Any sanding is therefore only damaging. Use of modern cleaning compounds, oils or preservatives will shorten the life of the teak, as it contains natural teak-oil a very small distance below the white surface. Wooden boat experts will only wash the teak with salt water, and re-caulk when needed. This cleans the deck, and prevents it from drying out and the wood shrinking. The salt helps it absorb and retain moisture, and prevents any mildew and algal growth. People with poor knowledge often over-maintain the teak, and drastically shorten its life.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teak
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essex2visuvesi

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2012, 12:45:44 PM »

Odd seeing as how it is used in 1:1 scale ships, though possibly not so much nowadays as it is not a sustainable timber.


Not really.... cast iron and steel was is used in 1:1 ships but you don't see it in models that often :)

In all seriousness tho I think the reason the book said that it was unsuitable was more due to the nature of the wood itself, being quite difficult to work with.  I'll have to double check
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grendel

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2012, 02:03:33 PM »

probably because it has a fairly coarse grain, which would make it difficult to handle in small sizes such as models.
Grendel
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Colin Bishop

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2012, 03:40:45 PM »

I think the main reason for not using it for model boat construction is its oily nature which doesn't take paint well. It is also poisonous if it pierces the skin. Back in the daya of the old wooden walls, they used to build frigates and other ships in India from Burma Teak which is very durable. However, in action, the main danger to crews in those days came from wood splinters rather than the cannon balls themselves and teak splinters were frequently fatal due to their toxicity.
 
Colin
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grendel

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2012, 04:12:39 PM »

many years back now I picked up some offcuts from where they were replacing the groins, apart from being very waterlogged the timber was nasty if you got a splinter, the wound would fester within hours. now over 20 years later the timber is still as sound as the day I got it, despite being out in the weather ever since, and being used in places as a raised bed. I cant recall the timber (possibly greenheart) but it is a sustained forest wood, but atrocious to work.
Grendel
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Nordlys

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2012, 06:46:12 PM »

I have to say many thanks to all these replies to my post.
 
Of course, I don't have to use Teak, as there are many varieties
of veneers available, Mahogany, walnut, cherry etc.
Perhaps I might be better off choosing a veneer
wood that isn't so oily because I would probably want
to put a coat of lacquer or varnish over the top anyway?
 
Would a varnish take on this wood?
 
As Teak has been used for decking on boats historically I
thought it would be more than suitable for model boats!
 
Nordlys....
 
 
 
 
 
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DickyD

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2012, 06:51:59 PM »

You can varnish teak OK. 
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Jerry C

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #13 on: November 08, 2012, 07:06:15 PM »

In blue flu on departure trincomalee we holy stoned the wooden decks with soft soap then lathered them in linseed oil. By the time we cleared port said it had soaked in leaving a smooth silky finish which protected the decks against the ravages of Birkenhead and Liverpool docks. Outward bound all scrubbed off again and kept that way.
If you want to varnish teak then give it a clean with acetone to remove the natural oil from the surface. If cutting teak it will rapidly dull normal tools due to its high silica content.
Jerry.

Colin Bishop

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #14 on: November 08, 2012, 07:15:35 PM »

Teak is best varnished with something like Danish Oil or Teak Oil to retain its warm colour but this is best if the wood is in a protected situation and not subject to UV or exterior weathering. A lot of boatowners prefer to leave it untreated when it fades to a silvery colour needing virtually no maintenance.
Personally I love the colour of oiled teak and our lounge furniture and my model display case are teak veneered.
Colin
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Stavros

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #15 on: November 08, 2012, 08:13:13 PM »

grendel the wood you refer to is more than likely to be Greenhart as this was ofter used in the construction of Piers groynes etc and was used for it's longenjevity ....if thats how you spell it LOL
 
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grendel

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #16 on: November 08, 2012, 08:34:32 PM »

all I know is dont get a splinter in your hand with it.
Grendel
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Stavros

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Re: Teak Veneer decking
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2012, 08:36:45 PM »

Had a splinter last year when My old greenhart fishing rod split and as you said if festered within an hour so I know what you mean.
 
 
 
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