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Author Topic: Lateen rigging  (Read 7354 times)

tigertiger

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Re: Lateen rigging
« Reply #25 on: August 07, 2008, 09:27:04 AM »

Thanks for this info Jimmy
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George Steele

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Re: Lateen rigging
« Reply #26 on: October 17, 2008, 08:52:08 PM »

In THE DHOW by C.W. Hawkins ISBN 0 245 52655 2 at pages 58-59 he describes how certain dhows were worn around. When the ship is heading dead to leeward (the leeward shrouds were already cast off as they were not used while sailing on that tack) the sheet is cast off and flies forward, the yard is  topped up and the throat halliard loosened a bit and the yard is manhandled until it is vertical and the sail flies forward, the large crew manhandles the butt of the yard around the   the forward side of the mast and somehow they retrieve the sheet and haul in on it on the new leeward side as the shrouds are set up on the new windward side. The halyard is set up again and the sheet tended as the ship comes around onto the new course.
     There are two books by Alan Villiers (one mostly of his photos) the other  has a title something like Sailing with Sinbad the Sailor where he explains this manuever but at the moment I can not find either of them.. Then Tim Severn in "The Sinbad Voyage" Putnam ISBN 0 399 12757 7 describes his voyage in a dhow.
      I remember reading somewhere when 3 and 4 masted ships were used with one or two of those masts having lateen sails that there were two different ways to rig the masts with the lateen sails. In the southern fashion the lateen yard and sail were outside of the shrouds while the other method, the northern one, had the yard and sail inside the shrouds. Thus I believe in the northern fashion the yard was shifted behind the mast while in the southern method they were shifted forward of the mast. Thus in the southern ships the braces for the yards forward of the lateen rigged mast went forward while in the northern ships they went aft.
       Clear enough???
    Finally in another book on Models is says and shows a Med. xebeck with three lateen rigged masts and says that one or two of the sails were always "wrong", that is aback. That is the way they were sailed!!!
             George Steele
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George Steele

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Re: Lateen rigging
« Reply #27 on: October 20, 2008, 04:07:17 PM »

Written material on this topic includes the following
"Son of Sinbad" by Alan Villiers, Scribners 1940.
"Sons of Sinbad The Photographs" British National Maritime Museum, 2006, ISBN 10:0 94806575 3 and 13:978 0 948065 75 0
"The Dhow" by C. W. Hawkins, Nautical Publishing Co. Ltd. 1977 ISBN 0 245 52655.2. This has a good description of wearing.
"Eighteenth Century Rigs & Rigging, by K. H. Marquardt, Phoenix Publications Inc. 1986 ISBN 1-881093 00 X at pp.160-162.
"The Sinbad Voyage" by Tim Severin, G. P. Putnal & sons 1982 ISBN 0-399-12757-7 SEE PAGES 178 ET SEQ.
"tHE sHIPS OF cHRISTOPHER cOLUMBUS BY x. pASTOR, nAVAL iNSTITUTE pRESS, isbn 1-55750-755-4. This shows the two smaller ships but does not clarify how the sails were handled.
"Spritsails and Lugsails" by John Leather, Granada Publishing 1979 ISBN 0 229 11517 9. Says the dipping lud sail had only one shroud which was shifted when the boat tacked.
"a sCRATCH mODELER'S lOG" by A. R. Lansir, a Moonraker Pub. 1984, ISBN 0-8168-0014-6
"Historic Ship Models The Musee de la Marine Collection", J. Boudroit, Pier Books, 2004 ISBN 0-9755772-2-0
The Lateen Mizzen in Europe by Peter Hodges pp.39-47 in No 24 "Model Shipwright" June 1978, Conway Maritime Press London. Discusses the different ways the northern and southern ships handled the lateen sails.
    The net result is that the sail and yard can be to windward or to leeward and never be changed when the ship tacks (or wears). This appears to have been the practice in the Meditteranean, but in the Dhows  of Arabia they usually wore and hoisted the yard vertical and manhandled the butt around the mast forward of same. The shrouds were cast off on the lee side so they did not interfere with the sail. However, in an emergency the ship could be tacked so that the sails were aback after the tack. But another type of ship called a Thoni had a gaff mizzen and lateen sails on the main and fore masts and did NOT shift the yards when she tacked, thus one was always aback.
    Finally, eventually, in Europe the sail was split and laced to the mast. On experimental ships the bare forward part of the mizzen lateen yard had a lug or jib like sail attached to the part of the yard forward of the mast.
Thats all I know!!
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tigertiger

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Re: Lateen rigging
« Reply #28 on: October 21, 2008, 03:50:16 PM »

Good info, thanks.

The bit about wering is important as it will help me manouver with maximum efficiency and help me plan the how and why of the RC.
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dreadnought72

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Re: Lateen rigging
« Reply #29 on: October 21, 2008, 03:58:36 PM »

Yes - all valuable stuff.

I have tentative plans for a lateen rigged crusader ship of the 1260's ... so presumably the "northern tradition" ... to be built sometime in the 20-teens.

Andy #1963#
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Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia
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