Model Boat Mayhem - Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length.
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... 18   Go Down

Author Topic: This Day In 'Boating' History  (Read 159807 times)

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
This Day In 'Boating' History
« on: December 18, 2012, 07:43:05 AM »

I know that there are general 'This Day In History' websites, but not sure if there are any relating more specifically to Model-Boating and/or any other Marine, Maritime, Naval, or Nautical, dates of note.

So, let's run this up the flag-pole and see if anyone salutes... 

December 18th

On December 18, 1620, the British ship Mayflower docked at modern-day Plymouth, Massachusetts, and its passengers prepared to begin their new settlement, Plymouth Colony.
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/mayflower-passengers-come-ashore-at-plymouth-harbor

In 1902, George Dewey, Admiral of the US Navy, receives orders to send his battleship to Trinidad and then to Venezuela to make sure that Great Britain's and Germany's dispute with Venezuela was settled by peaceful arbitration not force.

Steven Spielberg, director of the blockbuster movie 'Jaws' (1975), is born on this day in 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio.

1965 - Helicopters from HS-11 on USS Wasp (CVS-18) pick up crew and capsule of Gemini 7, after picking up the crew and capsule of Gemini 6 two days earlier.
Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?

furball

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 245
  • Location: Herne Bay, Kent
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2012, 12:17:59 AM »

December 19th, 1981.


The loss of the Penlee lifeboat, Solomon Browne, and the MV Union Star, with all crew. R.I.P.


Lance
Logged

TailUK

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,634
  • Location: East Midlands
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2012, 10:32:10 AM »

19th Dec, 1972; Aircraft carrier USS Ticonderoga recovers the crew of Apollo 17 (Cernan, Evans and Schmitt), the last manned mission to the moon.
Logged
No human society has ever functioned without models to capture, explain,disseminate,
persuade, sell, reinforce and analyse all kinds of ideas, values, concepts and situations.

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2012, 07:59:39 PM »

December 19th, 1981.


The loss of the Penlee lifeboat, Solomon Browne, and the MV Union Star, with all crew. R.I.P.


Lance

I'm glad that you found this as, having just re-read the story on Wikipaedia, I've learned more about it than I remember or ever realised, and given me the chance to reflect for a moment.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penlee_lifeboat_disaster

I also found another significant event which occurred on this day in 1941.
Human torpedoes of Italian Decima Flottiglia MAS in Alexandria placed 'Limpet mines' which severely damaged the HMS Valiant and HMS Queen Elizabeth in Alexandria harbour.

An interesting story and also worthy of a moment's reflection for the casualties.

Andy

 
Note: The reply and images below and copied directly from the post by Rotweiller on December 22, 2011, 01:22:11 in the specific PENLEE LIFEBOAT DISASTER thread:
Here is a photo of the Flagstaff, made from a piece of the wreckage of the Lifeboat, Dedicated to the Lost Crew of the Solomon Browne. Also of the memorial plaque,placed under the Flag.  These are placed in a quiet part of Truro Cathedral,  enter through the Great Door, and turn to the right.My apologies for the poor quality of the Photos

Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History - Arctic Convoy Veterans Medal
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2012, 11:20:44 PM »

2012 - PM David Cameron announced today that Veterans of the Arctic convoys, which supplied  vital fuel, food and munitions to Russia during the second world war, are finally to be awarded their own star medal after 67 years of campaigning for proper recognition of their bravery.

Apparently, more than 3,000 seamen were killed during 78 convoys that delivered 4m tons of cargo. Eight-five merchant ships and 16 Royal Navy vessels were destroyed. It is thought 66,500 men sailed on the convoys, of which just 200 are alive today.

Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?

Peter Fitness

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6,826
  • Location: Wyrallah, near Lismore NSW Australia
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2012, 12:36:29 AM »

It never ceases to astound me how long governments take to react to situations such as the one adross mentions. The bravery of the seamen on the Arctic convoys has been well documented, and I'm dumbfounded to learn that there has been no official recognition. I suppose it's better late than never.


Peter.
Logged

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
This Day In 'Boating' History - Stolen ship's bell 'found' at scrap yard
« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2012, 02:04:49 PM »

2010 - A 100-year-old bronze bell, weighing about half-a-tonne and standing one-metre tall, from the light-house ship Carpentaria was 'found' at a Brisbane scrap metal yard following it's disappeance from the Queensland Maritime Museum at South Bank a few days earlier.

Although it had been lovingly restored by volunteers over the past year, a museum spokesman said the scrap yard claimed they purchased it from an agent and the bell was destined to be cut up and melted for scrap.

http://www.maritimemuseum.com.au/Collections/carpentaria.htm

Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?

Capt Podge

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 3,275
  • Location: Blyth, Northumberland
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2012, 02:09:28 PM »

Wednesday, 20th December 1939   'SS Mars' (1,877t) a Swedish ship, en route from Kopmaholnen to London was mined and sank off Whitley Bay at 55°03'48"N - 01°23'59"W in 90ft of water. Nine survivors of the 'Mars' were landed at North Shields at 16.30. Four of the crew members were injured and were taken to the Royal Jubilee Hospital, Tynemouth.
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
Logged
Pop top campervan needed

dave301bounty

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 665
  • Location: Wavertree
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2012, 02:47:19 PM »

I n reply to the men of the Russian Convoys ,I meet over the years at the Pier head ,and from 9 men who were on the convoys ,last year there was only one ,but last year the meeting was large and a lot of people are asking a lot more ,which is a nice thing to know ,after all this time .but dont mention that scrap thing at woodside .
Logged

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
This Day In 'Boating' History - Worst Peace-time Maritime Disaster
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2012, 07:21:38 PM »

According to Jules Verne's classic adventure novel 'Around the World in 80 Days', December 20th 1872 is the date that Phileas Fogg of London, with his French valet Passepartout, completes the task set by his friends at the Reform Club, of circumnavigating the globe in 80 days or less.

Clearance of Suez Canal for mines and unexploded ordnance was completed by a Joint Task Force in 1974.

During the night of December 20, 1987 while most of the passengers slept, the Philippine-registered passenger ferry, Doņa Paz, sank after colliding with the MT Vector which was carrying 8,800 barrels of gasoline.
The impact started a fire on board the Vector which quickly spread to the Doņa Paz, as well as lighting the surrounding water on fire. The life jackets aboard the Doņa Paz were reportedly locked up, forcing passengers to jump into flaming shark-infested waters in order to attempt escape.
With an estimated death toll of 4,375 people, the collision resulted in the deadliest ferry disaster in history during peace time.

http://www.oddee.com/item_98175.aspx#Ulh3mWytKXzsiZ4v.99
Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?

dave301bounty

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 665
  • Location: Wavertree
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2012, 07:35:14 PM »

sad one that .
Logged

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #11 on: December 21, 2012, 03:29:30 PM »

On this day in 1762, British Explorer Captain James Cook marries Elizabeth Batts
 
HMS Beagle sails into Bay of Islands (New Zealand) in 1835.

In the United States of America, Congress authorised the Medal of Honor, the Nation's highest award, for Naval personnel in 1861
 
in 1872 HMS Challenger, under Captain George Nares, sails from Portsmouth. The Challenger expedition (named after the mother vessel) of 1872–76 was a scientific exercise that made many discoveries to lay the foundation of oceanography.

In 1925, a silent film directed by Sergei Eisenstein and produced by Mosfilm was first shown in Moscow. The film, "Battleship Potemkin", was a dramatised version of the mutiny that occurred in 1905 when the crew of the Russian battleship Potemkin rebelled against their officers of the Tsarist regime.

1941 German submarine U-567 sinks

1943 USS Grayling (SS-208) sinks fourth Japanese ship since 18 December.
 
1945 George S Patton, U.S. General (Sicily/Normandy), dies aged 60 having sustained injuries in a car crash near Mannheim, Germany twelve days earlier. He is buried among the soldiers who died in the Battle of the Bulge in Hamm, Luxembourg

1951 Sees the first helicopter landing aboard a hospital ship, USS Consolation.
 
In 1962, President Kennedy and British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan announced an agreement in which the US will sell Polaris missiles to the UK. Polaris, a two-stage solid-fuelled rocket system designed to be fired underwater from a submarine, carries a half-megaton nuclear warhead at a speed of 17,500 mph

in 1985, an environmental disaster occurs when the SS ARCO Anchorage runs aground , spilling thousands of barrels of crude oil near Port Angeles, WA
 
http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/article/20101219/NEWS/312199991/giant-oil-spill-in-port-angeles-25-years-ago-provides-lessons-used
Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
This Day In 'Boating' History - December 22nd
« Reply #12 on: December 22, 2012, 06:09:48 AM »

1775: A Continental naval fleet with 7 ships was organized in the rebellious American colonies under the command of Ezek Hopkins.

1810: British frigate HMS Minotaur, a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 6 November 1793 at Woolwich was wrecked with the loss of 480 lives, when she struck the Haak Bank on the Texel off the Netherlands.

1841: In Philadelphia, the commissioning of USS Mississippi, the first U.S. ocean-going side-wheel steam warship.

1944: USS Swordfish (SS-193), a Sargo-class submarine, left Pearl Harbor for her thirteenth war patrol, in the vicinity of Nansei Shoto. In addition to her regular patrol, Swordfish was to conduct photographic reconnaissance of Okinawa, for preparation of the Okinawa Campaign

1946: German Hipper-class heavy cruiser 'Prinz Eugen' survived WW2, and was transferred to the US Navy as a war prize. After examination in the US, she was used for nuclear weapons tests in July 1946 before being towed to Kwajalein Atoll where she capsized and sank.

1963: The cruise-liner TSMS Lakonia caught fire and sank 180 miles north of Madeira with the loss of 128 lives.
Originally in service as the MS Johan van Oldenbarnevelt, sailing between Amsterdam and the East Indies, the Dutch-built vessel had also beren used as an allied troopship and as a pleasure cruiser, before she was sold to the General Steam Navigation Company of Greece.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TSMS_Lakonia

1988: Just before midnight, the tug Ocean Service collided with its tow, the barge Nestucca, while trying to replace a broken tow line off the coast of Washington, near Grays Harbor. The tug punctured a cargo tank, releasing an estimated 5500 barrels of the heavy marine fuel into the ocean, spreading 300 miles along the WA and BC coast.

1990: An Israeli ferry carrying 102 U.S. servicemen back to the aircraft carrier Saratoga after Christmas shore leave in Haifa, capsized and sank. 21 sailors perished.
Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?

Neil

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,385
  • Location: near Fleetwood
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #13 on: December 22, 2012, 12:04:52 PM »

Today in 1943 began a sea chase to equal that of the Sinking of the Bismark.
The Battle of the North Cape.........on this day after a two day conference with his admirals, Doenitz ordered the KMS Scharnhorst to set to sea from her fjordic lair in Norway to seek out and destroy a convoy heading for Murmansk in Russia.
She set sail on 22nd December 1943, but never made it, being sought out and attacked continuously by British forces, she succumbed to the icey waters of the Arctic off the North Cape with a loss of all but approximately 50 crewmen on Christmas Day, 1943
Logged

Capt Podge

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 3,275
  • Location: Blyth, Northumberland
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #14 on: December 22, 2012, 02:46:53 PM »

Saturday, 23rd December 1939   'SS Pandora' renamed 'Dolphin' (4,580t) was heading for Blyth under tow to start her new career as a submarine accommodation ship for the submarine base at Blyth, when she struck a mine at 55°06'05"N - 01°27'09"W. Much of the wreck still remains and lies 19 metres of water.

 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
Logged
Pop top campervan needed

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
This Day In 'Boating' History - December 23rd
« Reply #15 on: December 23, 2012, 06:51:58 AM »

December 23

1524: Portuguese explorer, Vasco da Gama dies. One of the most celebrated explorers of the Discovery Age and commander of the first ships to sail directly from Europe to India. This achievement provided the Portuguese with unopposed access to the legendary Indian spice routes and allowed them to establish a colonial empire in Asia.

1919: The first ship designed to be used as an ambulance for the transport of sick & wounded naval personnel was launched. The hospital ship was named USS Relief and had 515 beds.

1937: First flight of the 'production version' Vickers Wellington 1 (Vickers Type 285). Designed as a twin-engine, long range medium bomber, it also served with Coastal Command in the Anti-Submarine role, and for Mine Clearence, by way of a 48ft degaussing ring fitted to the airframe.

1940: Papanikolis (Y-2), one of the most successful Greek submarines of WW2, sinks the Italian motor ship Antonietta, and on the very next day, the 3,952-ton troop carrier Firenze near Sazan Island.

1943: Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery was ordered back to Britain to take command of the 21st Army Group which comprised all of the ground forces assigned to the D-day invasion of Normandy.

1947: In what would be a major development for radio and other electronics, John Bardeen, Walter H. Brattain and William Shockley invented the transistor at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey. The trio would win the 1956 Nobel Prize in physics for their work.

1954: The classic movie, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, was released. The film was one of Walt Disney's most successful, starring Kirk Douglas and James Mason as Captain Nemo.

1964: Radio London, Britain's third major "pirate radio" station, begins broadcasting from MV Galaxy, a former American vessel used as a minesweeper in WW2.
Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
This Day In 'Boating' History - December 24th
« Reply #16 on: December 24, 2012, 12:37:27 AM »

1593: A severe storm hits Texel (the largest of the Dutch Wadden islands). When several ships broke free from their anchors and rammed into others, the resullts were disasterous. Almost 200 ships that night and around one thousand crew members drowned.

1777: Christmas Island was discovered by Captain James Cook on Christmas Eve 1777,  Kiritimati or Christmas Island, a Pacific Ocean raised coral atoll, is in the world's farthest forward time zone, andis one of the first inhabited places on Earth to experience the New Year each year.

1832: HMS Beagle anchors in Wigwam Bay at Cape Receiver
     
1861: British blockade runner 'Prince of Wales' is destroyed after being ran aground by the 'USS Gem of the Sea' off the coast at Georgetown, South Carolina.

1941: The first ships of Admiral Nagumo's Pearl Harbor fleet return to Japan

1944: The S.S. Leopoldville, was struck by a torpedo fired by U-486, a Type VIIC U-boat. The Belgian passenger liner converted to troopship was carrying 2235 men of the 66th Infantry Div from Southampton to Cherbourg. Several hundred of the troops were killed in the initial blast. Although tragically, a combination of errors, delays, oversights and communication problems eventually resulted in the death of several hundred more from injuries, drowning or hypothermia.

1988: North Sea oil production was dealt another blow just five months after the Piper Alpha disaster, when a giant floating storage vessel, the Medora, broke free of its moorings in gale-force winds.
The loss of the super-tanker led to the immediate shutdown of the Fulmar and Auk fields, operated by Shell, and the Clyde Field run by Britoil which is now run by BP.

2010: In a new deal, France is contracted to build two warships for Russia
Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?

Capt Podge

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 3,275
  • Location: Blyth, Northumberland
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2012, 12:51:06 AM »

Wednesday, 24th December 1941  'SS Stanmount' (4,468t) tanker, London to the Humber, sunk by a mine off Great Yarmouth.
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
Logged
Pop top campervan needed

Capt Podge

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 3,275
  • Location: Blyth, Northumberland
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #18 on: December 24, 2012, 12:53:11 AM »

(oops, nearly missed this one)
 
 Friday, 24th December 1943   'HM Harbour Defence Launch 1388' was wrecked off Hartlepool.
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
Logged
Pop top campervan needed

heritorasphodel

  • Inactive
  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 282
  • Location: Near Canterbury
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #19 on: December 24, 2012, 01:06:27 AM »

24th December 1925, the foreman in charge of building the new Lifeboat slipway at Porthdinllaen, Caernarvonshire, Mr T. A. Hooper, joined the crew on a service to the S.S. Matje of Hull. In a gale and heavy seas she had anchored but was being slowly dragged towards rocks. With the help of the lifeboat crew, some of whom were put aboard, the Matje was able to put into Porthdinllaen Bay. In recognition of his contributions on this and a previous service Mr Hooper was presented with an inscribed barometer.


Andrew
Logged

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
This Day In 'Boating' History - December 25th
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2012, 09:00:10 PM »

December 25

1492: Columbus' ship Santa Maria docks at Dominican Republic

1642: Sir Isaac Newton, English mathematician and scientist who enunciated the laws of motion and the law of gravity.

1643: Christmas Island (Indian Ocean) founded and named by Captain William Mynors of the East India Ship Company vessel, the Royal Mary.

1758: Halley's comet first sighted by Johann Georg Palitzsch during it's return

1832: Charles Darwin celebrates Christmas in St. Martin at Cape Receiver
1833: Charles Darwin celebrates Christmas in Port Desire, Patagonia
1834: Charles Darwin celebrates Christmas on Beagle at Tres Montes, Chile
1835: Charles Darwin company celebrates Christmas in Pahia, New Zealand

1912: Italy lands troops in Albania to protect its interests during a revolt there.

1941: Japanese aircraft carriers Akagi/Kagu arrive back in Kure, Japan after the raid on Pearl Habour.

1941: Admiral Chester W. Nimitz arrives at Pearl Harbour to assume command of U.S. Pacific Fleet.

1959: Richard Starkey, 18, receives his first drum set. Within 7 years, Ringo is singing lead vocal on The Beatles 13th UK single release - Yellow Submarine. 

1969: 5 Israeli gunboats escape from Cherbourg harbor.

1976: The M/V Patra, originally built as the passenger ship Kronprins Frederik, sinks in Red Sea. Many of the estimated 450-475 people onboard, were pilgrims returning from Muslim holy sites of Mecca and Medina and Egyptian workers returning home with money and gifts for their families.
As the vessel sank, half a dozen passing ships came to their rescue, with the Russian tanker Lenino rescuing the captain and 201 of the survivors. 102 lives were lost.

1990: The first successful trial run of the system which would become the World Wide Web.

2011: The South Pole records its warmest temperature at -12.3 degrees Celsius at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station
Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
This Day In 'Boating' History - December 26th
« Reply #21 on: December 26, 2012, 01:07:01 AM »

December 26

1773: Expulsion of tea ships from Philadelphia

1792: Charles Babbage, the English mathematician who perfected the calculating machine, is born.

1825: Erie Canal opens.

1862: 1st U.S. Navy hospital ship enters service.

1925: Six U.S. destroyers are ordered from Manila to China to protect interests in the civil war that is being waged there.

1943: German battle cruiser Scharnhorst severely damaged after being outgunned by HMS Duke of York, and is finished off by British destroyers in The Battle of North Cape. 1,803 were killed with just 36 survivors.

1965: Paul McCartney is interviewed on pirate radio station Radio Caroline.
Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?

Capt Podge

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 3,275
  • Location: Blyth, Northumberland
Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #22 on: December 26, 2012, 03:04:51 PM »

Friday, 26th December 1941   The Free French minesweeping trawler 'Henriette' was sunk by a mine off the Humber.
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
 
Logged
Pop top campervan needed

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
This Day In 'Boating' History - December 27th
« Reply #23 on: December 27, 2012, 04:25:41 AM »

December 27

1703: The Methuen Treaty was signed between Portugal and England, giving preference to the import of Portuguese wines into England.

1777: Floating mines intended for use against British Fleet found in Delaware River.

1814: Destruction of schooner Carolina, the last of Commodore Daniel Patterson's make-shift fleet that fought a series of delaying actions that contributed to Andrew Jackson's victory at the Battle of New Orleans. After the loss, the naval guns were mounted on shore to continue the fight.

1831: HMS Beagle, with Charles Darwin on board, departs from Plymouth. It will eventually visit the Galapagos Islands where Darwin will form his theories on evolution.

1852: Heroine, a 250-tonne barque carrying emigrants bound for Port Philip, Australia, sank 3 or 4 miles off the coast from Lyme Regis after drifting helplessly in storm conditions for almost two days.
Tragically, although the entire complement of the Heroine survived (43 in total), four out of the five men who set out to assist the Heroine using an improvised lifeboat, were drowned when their pinnace was overwhelmed by the huge seas and overturned.

1904: James Barrie's play "Peter Pan" premieres in London, introducing the world to Never Never Land, the ticking Crocodile, and the dastardly Captain Hook.

1922: Japanese aircraft carrier Hosho becomes the first purpose built aircraft carrier to be commissioned in the world.

1943: Montgomery discusses Overlord with Eisenhower and Bedell Smith

1965: Britain's first off-shore drilling platform, the BP oil rig 'Sea Gem', capsized in the North Sea with the loss of 13 lives. The British cargo ship Baltrover happened to be passing and was first to spot the collapse of the Sea Gem at 1409GMT. It went to assist, sending a radio message to shore for further help.
A public inquiry into the sinking concluded metal fatigue in part of the suspension system linking the hull to the legs was to blame.

Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?

ardarossan

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 670
  • Location: UK
This Day In 'Boating' History - December 28th
« Reply #24 on: December 28, 2012, 04:02:33 PM »

December 28

1655: Charles Cornwallis, First Lord of the British Admiralty, is born.

1778: HMS Cupid, A 14 cannon sloop-of-war, purchased in 1777, foundered off Newfoundland.

1905: Drydock Dewey left Solomon's Island, MD, enroute through the Suez Canal to the Philippines to serve as repair base. This, the longest towing job ever accomplished, was completed by Brutus, Caesar, and Glacier on 10 July 1906.

1917: The Liverpool pilot boat Alfred H. Read (below), a steamship built in 1913, struck a mine near the entrance to the Mersey and sank almost immediately. Of the forty-one men on board, only two were saved.


1944: U-735 (Type VIIC), was sunk in during a British air-raid in the Oslofjord near Horten, Norway. 39 were lost, with one survivor.

1945: U-680 (Type VIIC), surrendered on 5 May 1945 at Baring Bay, near Fredericia, Denmark and was transferred to Loch Ryan, Scotland for Operation Deadlight. She was sunk on 28 Dec 1945, by gunfire from the British destroyer HMS Onslaught.

1982: Recommissioning of USS New Jersey (BB-62), the first of four Iowa-class battleships that were returned to service in 1980s.

1990: USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) and USS America (CV-66) Carrier Battle Groups deploy from Norfolk, VA, for Middle East to join Operation Desert Shield.

2011: Iran threatens to close down the key oil route of the Strait of Hormuz if Western nations impose more sanctions.
Logged
How much wood would a Woodchuck chuck, if a Woodchuck would chuck wood?
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... 18   Go Up