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Author Topic: This Day In 'Boating' History  (Read 159996 times)

ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #100 on: February 01, 2013, 09:57:20 PM »

February 1st...

1917: Following yesterday's announcement (31 January 1917), Germany illegally resumes unrestricted U-boat warfare in the Atlantic, and German torpedo-armed submarines prepare to attack any and all ships, including civilian passenger carriers, said to be sited in war-zone waters.

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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #101 on: February 02, 2013, 01:07:32 AM »

Friday, 2nd February 1940   'SS British Councillor' (7,048t) tanker, lost off Withernsea, it is possible that she struck a mine.
 
 
'SS Portelet' (1,064t) sank on a voyage from Ipswich to Sunderland with the loss of two of her crew.
 
 Monday, 2nd February 1942   The minesweeping trawlers 'Cape Spartel' and 'Cloughton Wyke' were sunk by German aircraft, off the Humber.
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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ardarossan

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This Day in 'Boating' History - February 2nd
« Reply #102 on: February 02, 2013, 10:11:14 AM »

February 2nd...

1536: Buenos Aires is founded (for the first time) by Spanish explorer & conquistador Pedro de Mendoza, but attacks by local indigenous tribes forced the settlers to move to Asunción, Paraguay in 1539 and by 1541 the site had been burned and abandoned.

1709: Scottish seaman Alexander Selkirk is rescued from a desert island after 4 years and 4 months as a castaway, by the 'Duke', a privateering ship, captained by Woodes Rogers and piloted by William Dampier. Selkirk's story of isolation and survival aroused great interest at home, and Daniel Defoe's fictional character Robinson Crusoe was based (in part) on him.


The statue of Alexander Selkirk at the site of his original house
on Main Street, Lower Largo Fife, Scotland

1818: The first ocean liner, 'James Monroe', arrives in Liverpool, England, having set out at the scheduled time & date (10:00am January 5) on a snowy, New York morning. From now on, The Black Ball Line would operate a regular trans-atlantic service, with one of their ships sailing from New York to Liverpool on the 5th of each month, whilst another would start the reverse trip on the 1st of each month.

1880: SS 'Strathleven' earned a place in history when she berthed in London's East India Dock with the first cargo of frozen meat from Australia. A group of Australian businessmen headed by Mr Andrew McIlwraith chartered the vessel and fitted her with an adapted dry-air refrigerating machine built by Bell~Coleman & Co., Glasgow.
Sheep and cattle carcasses were taken on board for freezing, and with 40 tons of frozen beef, mutton, lamb and butter she sailed from Melbourne on December 6, 1879.

1886: Groundhog Day is observed for the first time at Gobbler's Knob in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, by a group of German settlers.

1912: During an exercise off the Isle of Wight, Britsh 'A-class' submarine, HMS 'A3' (below), was accidentally rammed when she surfaced directly in the path of HMS 'Hazard'. The collision tore a large hole in the side of the submarine, sinking her almost immediately with the loss of all on board.
The submarine was subsequently raised and the bodies of the crew recovered. They were buried, later, in the Haslar Royal Naval Cemetery. The wrecked submarine was sunk as a gunnery target near Portland Bill on 12 May 1912.


1961: Off the coast of Brazil, parleys between rebels and a party of representatives headed by U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Smith, result in the hijacked Portugese liner, 'Santa Maria', sailing into the port of Recife and anchoring in the harbour. Shortly afterwards, the 900 passengers and crew, held captive since 23rd January, are released and ferried ashore by several tug-boats.


Portugese luxury liner 'Santa Maria' anchored at Recife
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - February 3rd...
« Reply #103 on: February 02, 2013, 11:53:25 PM »

February 3rd...

1488: The Portuguese navigator Bartholomeu Diaz landed at Mossal Bay, Cape of Good Hope, the first European known to have landed on the southern extremity of Africa. He was also the first known European to have traveled this far south and round the Cape.

1781: British forces under Admiral George Brydges Rodney, take the Dutch-owned Caribbean island Saint Eustatius.

1880: A terrific gale along the New Jersey coast swept six vessels ashore, All but two of the 47 persons on board survived.

1917: SS 'Housatonic', on a voyage from Galveston to Liverpool with a cargo of grain and flour, was sunk by the German submarine U-53 (Lt. Hans Rose), 20 miles south of Bishop Rock.
Rose allowed the captain, Thomas Ensor, and his crew to launch a pair of lifeboats, before sinking the 'Housatonic' with charges. Upon Ensor's request, Rose then towed the boats for almost 2 hours in the direction of the coast, until the trawler 'Salvator' was spotted on the horizon.
Initially the 'Salvator' did not react. Rose apparently advised Ensor, "That fellow is asleep, but I will wake him up for you". Rose then had a shot fired from his deck gun, to 'awake' the crew of the 'Salvator', which turned towards them making all speed to the area, by then U-53 had submerged and escaped.
A few hours after the incident, President Woodrow Wilson announced that the United States was breaking diplomatic relations with Germany. A decisive step towards U.S. entry into the First World War.

1943: The torpedoing of the transport USS 'Dorchester' off the coast of Greenland, saw USCGC 'Comanche' and 'Escanaba' respond. The crew of 'Escanaba' used a new 'retriever' rescue technique whereby swimmers clad in wet suits would swim to victims in the water and secure a line to them so they could be hauled to the ship. Although 'Escanaba' saved 133 men (one later died) and 'Comanche' saved 97, over 600 men were lost, including the 'Four Chaplains' who gave up their lifejackets to those that did not have one.


Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba (WPG-77) rescues survivors of USAT Dorchester, February 3, 1943.


1953: The French oceanographer Jacques-Yves Cousteau published his most famous and lasting work, The Silent World (Le Monde Du Silence), which was made into a film three years later.

1961: Aboard the 'Santa Maria' anchored in Recife harbour, rebels hand the hijacked liner over to Brazilian Naval authorities, and accept their Government's offer of political asylum.
The next day (4th Feb), the 'Santa Maria' was returned to her owners, Companhia Colonial de Navegação, who planned to sail her back to Portugal as soon as she was bunkered and minor engine-room repairs were complete.
The passengers of "Santa Maria", were transfered to her sister ship, the"Vera Cruz", which left Recife on 5th February, arriving in Lisbon nine days later.
"Santa Maria" eventually sailed from Recife on the 7th February, and arrived at the Alcântara quay in Lisbon on 16th Feb.
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #104 on: February 03, 2013, 12:48:47 AM »

Saturday, 3rd February 1940   'SS Alexandria' was sunk by German aircraft, E of Longstone Island, Farnes. Her exact position has not been determined.
 
'SS Jernfjeld' (1,370t) a Norwegian ship ran aground 800 yds S of St Mary's lighthouse at Briardene, due to heavy seas. The crew of eighteen escaped in their own lifeboat.
 
'SS Tempo' (629t) a Norwegian ship was sunk by German aircraft off St Abbs Head at 55°59'00"N - 01°35'00"W. She lies in 35 metres of water. A boat containing the captain and some of the crew landed safely at Eyemouth, but another boat containing six crew members drifted further south and unfortunately ended up on the wrong side of the pier at Berwick upon Tweed. It hit the rocks and capsized before coming ashore. Four of the six were dead and a fifth died later in the Harbour Master's house.
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #105 on: February 04, 2013, 01:46:46 AM »

Sunday, 4th February 1940   The Grimsby Marine ARP Party went out to sea at 11.00 and brought in a British seaman and three German airmen. These men had been picked up by the trawler 'Harlech Castle' after yesterdays attacks on shipping. The airmen are reported to be the crew of the aircraft brought down off the mouth of the Tyne.
 
 Tuesday, 4th February 1941   At anchor in the convoy anchorage in the Humber, the cargo ship 'SS Gwynwood' (1,177t) sank after a parachute mine landed on her deck aft and blew up. She was on a voyage from London to Sunderland.
 
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - February 4th
« Reply #106 on: February 04, 2013, 07:43:44 AM »

February 4th...

1697: Three VOC-ships (Dutch East India Company) under the command of Willem de Vlamingh, landed at Dirk Hartog Island, Western Australia (then 'New Holland'), and replaced the pewter plate left by Dirk Hartog in 1616 with a new one that bore a record of both of the Dutch sea-captain's visits. The original plate is preserved in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

1779: After a month's stay, Captain Cook got under sail again to resume his exploration of the Northern Pacific. Shortly after leaving 'Hawaii Island', the foremast of the 'Resolution' breaks and the ships return to Kealakekua Bay for repairs.

1810: The Royal Navy seizes the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe, and is occupied by the British until 1816, when it is ceded to Sweden.

1820: The Chilean Navy, under the command of Lord Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, completes the two-day long Capture of Valdivia with just 300 men and 2 ships, effectively ended the last vestiges of Spanish power in mainland Chile.   

1814: The last time the 'Great Frost Fair' would be held on the frozen River Thames, London.
Since the beginning of the 17th century, a Frost Fair had been held whenever the river iced over. The practice had lasted for 200 years, as people ventured out on the ice, vendors set up stalls, and a variety of entertainments were offered.


The last Great Frost Fair, 1st-4th February, 1814.

1959: The keel of the worlds first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, the USS 'Enterprise', was laid at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, VA. She will be the only carrier of her class.
When completed, she will be the only carrier to house more than two nuclear reactors, the only carrier with four rudders, and the longest naval vessel in the world at 1,123 ft (342 m).


USS Enterprise underway in the Atlantic Ocean

1988: Around 3,000 ferry men at Dover, Harwich and Portsmouth refused to return to work even though the National Union of Seamen (NUS) had called an end to the three-day stoppage, in support of 161 crew sacked by the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company for refusing to accept new terms and conditions. Ref: BBC News Report.

1999: Whilst riding out a storm, the crew of the 'New Carissa', a 639ft Panamanian-flagged dry bulk freighter optimized for carriage of wood chips, fail to notice she is dragging her anchor until she runs aground near Coos Bay harbour, Oregon.
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - February 5th
« Reply #107 on: February 05, 2013, 05:16:21 PM »

February 5th...

1782: The Spanish capture the island of Minorca from the British, after a long siege of St. Philip's Castle in Port Mahon.

1831: At the port of Antwerp, Belgians stormed aboard Jan Van Speijk's gunboat, demanding he take down the Dutch flag. Rather than complying, he fired a pistol into a barrel of gunpowder saying "Dan liever de lucht in", which translates as, "(I'd) rather be blown up then". Himself, and around 30 others were killed.


Gunboat No. 2 explodes before Antwerp. Martinus Schouman, 1832

1836: Voyage of H.M.S. Beagle (1831-36): In the evening HMS Beagle entered Storm Bay at Hobart Town on the island of Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania). Darwin will make several inland trips to study the local geology.

1909: Belgian chemist Leo Baekeland announces the creation of Bakelite, the world's first synthetic plastic.

1913: Greek military aviators, Michael Moutoussis and Aristeidis Moraitinis perform the first naval air mission in history, with a Farman MF.7 hydroplane.


The Farman MF.7 of Moutoussis & Moraitinis collected by Velos after their Dardanelles mission

1918: The Anchor Line steamship 'Tuscania', traveling as part of a British convoy and transporting over 2,000 American soldiers bound for Europe, is torpedoed by the German submarine U-77. and sinks off the coast of Ireland.

1924: The Royal Greenwich Observatory begins broadcasting the hourly time signals known as the Greenwich Time Signal or the "BBC pips".

1958: 1958: A hydrogen bomb is lost by the US Air Force somewhere in Wassaw Sound, near to Tybee Island, off the coast of Savannah, Georgia. Despite weeks of searching by USAF explosive experts and the US Navy, it has never been recovered.

1999: Attempts to refloat the 639ft dry bulk freighter, 'New Carissa', using her own power, end in failure, and she remains beached near Coos Bay, Oregon. The nearest salvage tugboat capable of towing such a large ship off a beach, the 'Salvage Chief', is moored at its home port, a 24-hour journey away. However, 'Salvage Chief' hasn't sailed for a year...


MV 'New Carissa', the day after she beached near Coos Bay, Oregon.
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #108 on: February 05, 2013, 07:02:46 PM »

Thursday, 5th February 1942   'SS Corland' (3,431t) cargo ship, Blyth to London with coal, was sunk by German aircraft, S of the Humber.
 
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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dave301bounty

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #109 on: February 05, 2013, 07:09:19 PM »

your giving us some very interesting facts Capt .
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - February 6th...
« Reply #110 on: February 06, 2013, 07:22:58 AM »

February 6th...

1806: Vice-Admiral Sir John Thomas Duckworth secures a British naval victory against the French at the Battle of San Domingo in the Caribbean.


Impérial being harassed by the much weaker HMS Northumberland before being driven ashore

1819: Sir Thomas Stamford Bingley Raffles founds Singapore, securing the transfer of control of the island to the East India Company.

1840: Representatives of the British Crown and various Māori chiefs sign the Treaty of Waitangi, establishing New Zealand as a British colony.

1861: English Vice-Admiral Robert Fitzroy issues the first storm warnings for ships.

1876: Henry George Blogg GC BEM, was born on this day - Legendary lifeboatman from Cromer, on the north coast of Norfolk, England, and the most decorated in RNLI history.


Cromer Coxswain Henry Blogg

1922: The Washington Naval Treaty is signed in Washington, D.C., by Great Britain, United States, Japan, France, and Italy (i.e. the major nations that had won World War I), whereby they agree to to prevent an arms race by limiting their naval construction.

1935: At the height of the Depression, 'Monopoly', a new board game from Parker Brothers, goes on sale in stores throughout the United States.


The Iconic Monopoly Battleship Piece

1959: Newly employed by Texas Instruments, Jack Kilby files the first patent for an integrated circuit (i.e. Microchip). Kilby described his new device as “a body of semiconductor material ... wherein all the components of the electronic circuit are completely integrated. The first customer for the new invention was the US Air Force.
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #111 on: February 06, 2013, 11:39:56 PM »

your giving us some very interesting facts Capt .

Thanks Dave - just wish I could post more info on each of the vessels mentioned - perhaps when time allows.....
 
 
 Thursday, 6th February 1941   'MV Angularity' (501t) on a journey from Ipswich to Newcastle with a cargo of phosphates was sunk by an E Boat in the Shipwash Channel.
 
 Tuesday, 6th February 1945   The Humber based blockade runners second casualty occurred today, when the 'Gay Viking', 'Hopewell' and 'Nonsuch' put to sea on 'Operation Moonshine' to deliver small arms and ammunition to the Dutch Resistance. During the voyage the 'Gay Viking' sank after being in collision with the 'Hopewell'. On the return trip the 'Hopewell' and the 'Nonsuch' brought back over sixty tonnes of much needed high grade steel.
 
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
 
 
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - February 7th
« Reply #112 on: February 07, 2013, 12:01:23 AM »

February 7th...

1783: French & Spanish forces lift the Great Siege of Gibraltar, retiring disheartened and defeated. The siege had been a joint Franco-Spanish attempt to capture Gibraltar from the British, during the American War of Independence. It was the largest action fought during the war in terms of numbers, and at three years and seven months, it is the longest siege endured by the British Armed Forces.


The Relief of Gibraltar on 11 October 1782 during the siege of 1779-1783

1788: The formal establishment of the colony of New South Wales occured on this day, when the formal proclamation of the colony and of Arthur Phillip's governorship were read out. The vesting of all land in the reigning monarch George III also dates from 7th February 1788.

1795: With the Netherlands occupied by revolutionary France, exiled Dutch Prince William of Orange agrees to British occupation, and writes to the Cape authorities requesting them to allow British warships to defend the Cape and to receive the British troops into the Fort as they would prevent a French invasion

1812: Author Charles Dickens was born in Landport, Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. Generally considered to be the greatest English novelist of the Victorian era. His works illustrate a thorough knowledge of the port of London (or “Down by the Docks”) and the surrounding districts, and cnvey a deep sympathy for those who worked in the port and sailed the ships.

1800: En route to the East Indies, frigate USS 'Essex' (1799) becomes the first U.S. Navy vessel to cross the Equator.

1863: HMS Orpheus, a Jason-class Royal Navy corvette that served as the flagship of the Australian squadron, was wrecked as she was delivering naval supplies and troop reinforcements to Auckland. 189 crew out of the ship's complement of 259 died in the disaster, making it the worst maritime tragedy to occur in New Zealand waters


The wreck of HMS Orpheus by Richard Brydges Beechey (1863).

1917: Just four days after U.S. President Woodrow Wilson ceased diplomatic relations with Germany, having warned that war would follow if American interests at sea were again assaulted, German submarine U-85 torpedoes the 470-foot, 9,000-ton, Anchor Line passenger steamer SS 'California', some 38 miles off the coast of Fastnet Island, Ireland. The explosion killed five people instantly and the devastated ship sank in just nine minutes. Of the 205 passengers and crewmembers on board, 38 were drowned, for a total of 43 dead.

1974: The 18-month old deep sea factory ship FV 'Gaul' reports to owners, British United Trawlers, that she is in the Barents Sea, north of Norway. It will be the last time she reports her position.

2005: Britain's Ellen MacArthur breaks the world record for the fastest solo circumnavigation of the globe, aboard her 75-foot trimaran named 'B&Q/Castorama'. During her circumnavigation, she also set records for the fastest solo voyage to the equator, past the Cape of Good Hope, past Cape Horn and back to the equator again.
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #113 on: February 07, 2013, 12:12:33 AM »

Wednesday, 7th February 1940   'MV Gercoa' Dutch vessel had just left Blyth with a cargo of coal for the continent when she ran aground in calm weather on the Bear Back Rocks at Tynemouth. She grounded at high tide and by low water was high and dry. She was declared a total loss by Lloyds. A team of marine salvage experts, repaired and refloated her a month later!!
 
 
Regards,
 
 
Ray.
 
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - February 8th
« Reply #114 on: February 08, 2013, 04:55:59 PM »

February 8th...

1725: Peter the Great dies at Saint Petersburg, aged 52, (9th June 1662 - 8th February 1725) - Recognised as being the 'Father of the Russian Navy'.

1828: Jules Gabriel Verne was born in Nantes, France, to Pierre Verne, an attorney, and his wife, Sophie Allote de la Fuÿe.


An imagining of Jules Verne's 'Nautilus'.

1904: A surprise night-time torpedo attack by a squadron of Japanese destroyers on the Russian fleet anchored at Port Arthur, Manchuria, starts the two-day Battle of Port Arthur, and marks the beginning of the Russo-Japanese War.

1916: French armoured cruiser Amiral Charner was torpedoed off Beirut, the Austro-Hungarian U-boat U-36 (Re-assigned German U-Boat U-21) and sank in only two minute, killing 374.

1974: The last three astronauts to man the AmericanSpace Station 'Skylab', return safely to Earth after speding 85 days in space. They slash-down in the sea off San Diego, where they were met by the assault ship 'New Orleans'.

1999: The 639ft dry bulk freighter 'New Carissa' was driven further ashore by continuing poor weather, north of the entrance to Coos Bay, Oregon.
Upon arrival of the 'Salvage Chief', it becomes apparent that the Salvage Contractors & Coastguard's plans to refloat her, would be of no use as the 'Salvage Chief's' towing gear was unable to reach the stricken freighter anyway.
However, when some cracks in the hull and oil leaks are noticed, any refloating attempts are precluded by the necessity to prevent a large-scale oil spill from 'New Carissa's fuel tanks.

2005: Following her return to England after breaking the world record for the fastest solo circumnavigation of the globe, it was announced that Ellen MacArthur would be appointed Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in recognition of her achievement. Coming immediately after the event, this recognition was reminiscent of accolades previously bestowed upon Francis Drake and Francis Chichester when reaching home shores after their respective circumnavigations in 1580 and 1967. MacArthur was also granted the rank of Honorary Lieutenant Commander, Royal Naval Reserve on the same day.
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #115 on: February 09, 2013, 12:02:24 AM »

Monday, 9th February 1942   'SS Empire Fusilier' (5,408t) cargo ship, Tyne to Tampa, Florida, United States, was sunk by U 85, E of Newfoundland.
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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ardarossan

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #116 on: February 09, 2013, 12:36:38 AM »

February 9th...

1711: Luis Vicente de Velasco e Isla is born. Spanish sailor and commander in the Royal Spanish Navy.
 
1747: (Admiral Sir) John Thomas Duckworth (1st Baronet, GCB), was born in Leatherhead, Surrey, England. One of five sons of Sarah Johnson and the vicar Henry Duckworth A.M. of Stoke Poges, County of Buckinghamshire. One of the lesser known of the Age of Sail admirals of the Royal Navy, Duckworth would achieve much in a naval career that began at the age of 11.

1904: The opening action of the Russo-Japanese War, 'The Battle of Port Arthur', concludes with no outright victor, as both sides sustain damage and casualties, although no ships are sunk either.


Japanese print displaying the destruction of a Russian ship

1941: Thirteen British aircraft from Scampton, Lincolnshire, attacked German battleship 'Tirpitz' at Wilhelmshaven, Germany. The air crews reported to have caused damage, but in actuality no hits were scored.

1945: On the basis of Enigma decrypts, a British V-class submarine, HMS 'Venturer', seeks, intercepts and destroys 'U-864' off the coast of Fedje, Norway. The incident is the only time in the history of naval warfare that one submarine intentionally sank another while both were submerged.

1971: The Apollo 14 command module 'Kitty Hawk', returns safely to Earth and splashes-down in the South Pacific Ocean, approximately 760 nautical miles south of American Samoa, where the crew were recovered by the amphibious assault ship USS 'New Orleans' (LPH-11). The Apollo 14 astronauts were the last lunar explorers to be quarantined on their return from the Moon.           


Command Module 'Kitty Hawk' 9th February 1971.

2001: With several civilian 'distinguished visitors' on board, the American submarine USS 'Greeneville' accidentally strikes and sinks the 'Ehime-Maru', a Japanese training vessel operated by the Uwajima Fishery High School. 'Ehime-Maru', sank in less than ten minutes with the death of nine crew members, including four high school students. The commander of the 'Greeneville' accepted full responsibility for the incident, and (was) retired with an honourable discharge.
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thegrimreaper

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RNLI posibly move post
« Reply #117 on: February 09, 2013, 09:29:52 AM »

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-21391481#
 
If any one wants to read just a small piece from Scotland
 
Regards Mark.
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Tug-Kenny

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Re: RNLI posibly move post
« Reply #118 on: February 09, 2013, 10:52:27 AM »


This refers to the boating disaster in Fraserburgh in 1953.

Perhaps someone could cover it in the section marked  'This day in boating history'  please.

Ken


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heritorasphodel

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #119 on: February 09, 2013, 11:39:57 AM »

9th February 1953 -


Fraserburgh's 46ft Watson class lifeboat John and Charles Kennedy launched at 1pm to escort local fishing boats into the harbour. Having seen two boats safely into the harbour, she turned out for a third time to find her assistance unnecessary. Coming about to return to the harbour, she was travelling at full speed just off the end of the north pier when a very heavy swell lifted her stern and broke amidships. Shortly after a second and even larger swell reared up astern, breaking aboard her. It filled the cockpit, throwing the six men inside into the engine controls. Coxswain Andrew Ritchie was thrown clear of the boat but was hit on the head by a piece of wreckage and drowned.


The lifeboat was capsized, and of the six men trapped under her only Second Coxswain C.G. Tait escaped, being washed up alive on rocks to the south of the harbour.


Andrew
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heritorasphodel

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #120 on: February 09, 2013, 11:45:59 AM »




The John and Charles Kennedy after she had been righted in Fraserburgh harbour.


Andrew
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Re: RNLI posibly move post
« Reply #121 on: February 09, 2013, 02:22:31 PM »

This refers to the boating disaster in Fraserburgh in 1953.

Perhaps someone could cover it in the section marked  'This day in boating history'  please.

Ken
Yes it has been covered in the posting listed.It quite rightly again recognises some of the sacrifices Lifeboat Crews have made over the years
Mick F
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #122 on: February 09, 2013, 07:52:41 PM »

February 9th...

1942: After the occupation of France, SS 'Normandie', one of the finest ocean liners ever built, had been seized by US authorities at New York and renamed USS 'Lafayette'. On the 9th February 1942, during her conversion into a troop-carrier, a workman’s cutting torch sets her alight. As the fire spread rapidly throughout the ship, thousands of tons of water were poured into the liner by the New York City Fire Department in an attempt to put out the inferno.
At 02:45hrs on the morning of the 10th Feb, SS 'Normandie'/Lafayette was overwhelmed by the weight of the water and capsized on to her port side in the mud of the Hudson River at her 'Pier 88' berth. She would never sail again.


Capsized and smouldering, the ex-liner SS 'Normandie' is damped-down by a Fireboat.


SS 'Normandie' (USS 'Lafayette'), lies capsized in the frozen mud of her New York Pier.

1960: According to her log, USS Sargo (SSN-583), a Skate-class nuclear-powered submarine, surfaced through the ice within 25ft of the North Pole at 10:49hrs. Later the same day, the Hawaiian flag was raised at the pole.
In preparation for an exploration mission below the Arctic ice, 'Sargo' had received alterations to strengthen her sail whilst being constructed; Scientific instruments were installed to assist her in navigating under the shifting polar ice and to locate open leads and thin ice through which to surface: and December 1959 brought the start of an intensive training program for the crew and scientific specialists.


USS Sargo surfaces at the North Pole on 9th February 1960
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - February 10th
« Reply #123 on: February 10, 2013, 06:34:36 AM »

February 10th...

60: Saint Paul the Apostle thought to have been shipwrecked at Malta.

1715: The first diving equipment was demonstrated in the River Thames and accepted into service.

1744: (Admiral the Honourable Sir) William Cornwallis (GCB) was born. His father was Charles the fifth baron and first earl Cornwallis and his mother was Elizabeth, daughter of Viscount Charles Townshend. William Cornwallis would go on to become a Royal Navy officer who fought in the Napoleonic Wars, but would be best known as a friend to Nelson and as the Commander-in-chief of the Channel Fleet.

1824: Samuel Plimsoll was born on this day in Bristol. He would become a British politician, a social reformer, and would devise the 'Plimsoll Line' - The line marked on a ship's hull indicating the maximum safe draft, and therefore the minimum freeboard for the vessel in various operating conditions.

1904: Japan and Russia declare war after Japan's surprise attack on Russian fleet at Port Arthur disabled seven Russian warships.

1906: The HMS 'Dreadnought', the first of a revolutionary new breed of battleships is christened and launched by King Edward VII.


HMS Dreadnought at sea - Note the torpedo net booms folded against her side

1944: During the night, 15 Soviet bombers attacked German battleship 'Tirpitz' to little effect.

1964: On the evening of 10 February 1964, two warships of the Royal Australian Navy, the aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne (R21) and the destroyer HMAS Voyager (D04) were performing manoeuvres off Jervis Bay, when Voyager sailed under Melbourne's bow. She was cut in two and sunk, and 82 of her crew killed.

1974: An air and sea search gets underway in the Arctic Ocean, for the Hull-based deep sea factory ship 'Gaul' and her 36-man crew after she twice fails to report in. The 18-month-old ship  did not issue any mayday signal and was fitted with the latest technology to deal with harsh conditions in the Arctic, including modern radio equipment and a dual-power system.

1999: MV 'New Carissa', a 639ft dry bulk freighter, beached for several days near the town of North Bend on the Oregon Coast, suffers major structural failure when the hull breaches near the engine room, flooding the engines with seawater, and increasing the rate at which oil is able to escape from two of her damaged fuel tanks and contaminate the coastline.
Altogether, the ships fuel tanks contain around 400 thousand gallons of diesel and bunker fuel, consequently, the Unified Command decide to use Napalm and other incendiary devices to ignite all the fuel tanks and burn off the oil.


Oil spill management, prior to igniting the fuel tanks on board 'New Carissa'
Coos Bay, Oregon. Feb. 1999
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ardarossan

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« Reply #124 on: February 10, 2013, 05:00:03 PM »

February 10th...

1945: Just after midnight, the German luxury liner, SS '(General von) Steuben', was torpedoed by the Soviet submarine S-13, whilst she was participating in Operation Hannibal. She sank in about 20 minutes with a loss of over four thousand lives.
Around 300 survivors were saved by torpedo boat T-196 and brought to Kolberg (now Kołobrzeg, Poland).

'Operation Hannibal', was part of the largest evacuation by sea in modern times. The evacuation of German refugees from Poland ahead of the Soviet Army's advance into the Baltic states and East Prussia, surpassed the British retreat at Dunkirk in both the size of the operation and the number of people evacuated (estimated 2 million). Despite this, it remains one of the least-known major operations of World War II.

Several days earlier (30th January), the Soviet submarine S-13, had been responsible for the worst loss of life in maritime history, when she torpedoed the 25,484-ton German liner 'Wilhelm Gustloff', which was also being used to transport refugess from Poland as part of Operation Hannibal.


SS Steuben (Formerly named 'Munchen', and also 'General von Steuben').
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