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Author Topic: This Day In 'Boating' History  (Read 160426 times)

ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - July 16th
« Reply #400 on: July 16, 2013, 08:49:00 AM »

July 16th...

1683: Manchu Qing Dynasty naval forces under traitorous commander Shi Lang defeat the Kingdom of Tungning in the Battle of Penghu, near the Pescadores Islands. The loss of Penghu resulted in Zheng Keshuang's surrender to the Qing.

1862: After David G. Farragut ran past the Fort Jackson, Fort St. Philip, and the Chalmette batteries to take the city and port of New Orleans on 29th April (a decisive event in the American Civil War), Congress honoured him by creating the rank of rear admiral on 16th July 1862 - a rank never before used in the U.S. Navy.
Previously, the American Navy had resisted the rank of admiral, preferring the term 'flag officer', to distinguish the rank from the traditions of the European navies.

1872: Roald Engelbregt Gravning Amundsen is born to a family of Norwegian shipowners and captains in Borge, between the towns Fredrikstad and Sarpsborg. His father was Jens Amundsen.
His mother would keep Roald out of the maritime industry of the family, pressuring him to become a doctor, a promise that Amundsen would keep until his mother died when he was aged 21, whereupon he quit university for a life at sea.
It would become apparent that Amundsen had hidden a lifelong desire, inspired by Fridtjof Nansen's crossing of Greenland in 1888 and the doomed Franklin expedition. As a result, he would decide on a life of intense exploration.

1938: Laid down in 1918, and commisssioned in 1924, H.M.S. 'Hermes' (95), the world's first ship to be designed and built as an aircraft carrier was reclassified as a 'Training Ship' after 14 years service, on this day in 1938. When WW2 begins the following year, she is restored to her original classification - as an Aircraft Carrier.


H.M.S. 'Hermes' in 1938.

1940: Adolf Hitler's 'War Directive No.16' of this date, details advanced planning for the invasion of the United Kingdom. As part of the preparations for such an assault (which are to be completed by the middle of August) the War Directive decrees that "the English Air Force must be so reduced morally and physically that it is unable to deliver any significant attack against the German crossing." The assault was codenamed Seelöwe (Sealion).

1945: After major repairs and an overhaul, the U.S. Navy heavy cruiser U.S.S. 'Indianapolis' leaves San Francisco, carrying parts and the enriched uranium (about half of the world's supply of Uranium-235 at the time) for the atomic bomb 'Little Boy', which would later be dropped on Hiroshima.


U.S.S. 'Indianapolis' off Mare Island, 10th July 1945.

1967: Portsmouth greengrocer and yachtsman, Alec Rose, sets sail in his 36ft pale blue ketch 'Lively Lady' at the start of what will be a 354-day single-handed circumnavigation of the world. During his 28,500-mile solo voyage, Alec Rose would also make stops in Australia and New Zealand.
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #401 on: July 16, 2013, 07:18:02 PM »

I feel that it might be time to let go of this thread, but didn't want to just stop adding posts without mentioning my thoughts in a courtesy message beforehand.

I've got a few days-worth of snippets on hand (which I'll add), but I think a few 'bits and pieces' saved for the longer term (some for up to 12 months time) are more than likely destined for the recycle bin.

Andy
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - July 17th
« Reply #402 on: July 17, 2013, 04:31:47 PM »

July 17th...

1704: Pierre-Charles Le Sueur, aged approximately 48 years, died from yellow fever in Havana, Cuba, shortly after returning from a trip to France, where he secured a commission to serve as a local magistrate in what is now Alabama.
The French fur trader and explorer in North America is recognised as the first known European to explore the Minnesota River valley.   

1714: John Forbes is born at Minorca as the second son of George Forbes, third earl of Granard and Mary, née Stewart, who was the eldest daughter of William, first Viscount Mountjoy. John would follow his father into the Navy, joining the 70-gun third rate HMS Burford on 31st May 1726, at the age of 12. He would be continually promoted throughout his career to eventually become Admiral of the Fleet 

1717: At about 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, 17th July, 1717, King George I and several aristocrats boarded a royal barge at Whitehall Palace for an excursion up the Thames toward Chelsea. The rising tide propelled the barge upstream without rowing. Another barge provided by the City of London contained about fifty musicians who premiered performed George Frideric Handel's Water Music. Many other Londoners also took to the river to hear the concert as, scored for a relatively large orchestra, the Water Music is particularly suitable for outdoor performance.


Painting of George Frideric Handel (left, with right arm extended) with King George I of Great Britain, traveling by barge on the Thames River while musicians play in the background. The painting is an artist's rendering of the first performance of Handel's Water Music in 1717.

1761: The Barton Aqueduct, opened on 17th July 1761, carried the Bridgewater Canal over the River Irwell at Barton-upon-Irwell in Greater Manchester, England. Designed largely by James Brindley under the direction of John Gilbert, it was the first navigable aqueduct to be built in England and was described as 'one of the seven wonders of the canal age.


Watercolour, pen and ink image of James Brindley's Barton Aqueduct, carrying the Bridgewater Canal over the River Irwell, c.1793.

1882: Two weeks after a Parliamentary Act approved the scheme, the East and West India Dock Company begin construction of Tilbury Dock on the River Thames at Tilbury in Essex, England
1882: James Fownes Somerville is born. He would go on to serve in the Royal Navy during WW1 and become  one of the most famous British admirals of World War 2; being promoted to Admiral of the Fleet in 1945. He would also receive Knighthood and earn several distinctions; GCB, GBE, DSO, DL.

1944: The Port Chicago disaster occurs at around 22:00 hrs at the Port Chicago Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California, U.S.A., when munitions on board the liberty ship SS 'E. A. Bryan' are detonated by an initial explosion during loading. The second, more powerful explosion created a fireball which was seen for miles - an Army Air Force pilot flying in the area reported that the fireball was 3 miles in diameter.

Chunks of glowing hot metal and burning ordnance were flung over 12,000 ft into the air. The 'E. A. Bryan' was completely destroyed and the 'Quinault Victory' (docked at the same pier) was blown out of the water, torn into sections and thrown in several directions; the stern landed upside down in the water 500 ft away. The Coast Guard fire boat CG-60014-F was thrown 600 ft upriver, where it sank. The pier - along with its boxcars, locomotive, rails, cargo and men - was blasted into pieces.

All 320 of the men on duty at the pier died instantly, and 390 civilians and military personnel were injured, many seriously. Among the dead were all five Coast Guard personnel posted aboard the fire barge. African Americans hurt and killed totaled 202 dead and 233 injured, which accounted for 15% of all African-American naval casualties during World War II.

1981: H.R.H. Queen Elizabeth II officially opens the Humber Bridge near Kingston upon Hull, England, United Kingdom. The suspension bridge was opened to traffic three weeks earlier on June 3rd.

1984: Six years after she was decommissionedand and laid-up, H.M.S. 'Devonshire' (D02), the first of the County-class guided-missile destroyers and the first Batch 1 ship of the Royal Navy (built by Cammell Laird in Birkenhead near Liverpool) is sunk as a target by H.M.S. 'Splendid' on 17th July 1984

Following preliminary preperation for disposal and 'marking-up' at Portsmouth Harbour, she was first used for testing the new 'Sea Eagle' Air-Launched Cruise Missile, then (two days after the Sea Eagle test) she was sunk by H.M.S. 'Splendid' in the North Atlantic during tests of the Mark 24-Mod-2 Tigerfish torpedo.

Named after the English county of Devon, her name was also used in the James Bond film 'Tomorrow Never Dies'.


Royal Navy hulk H.M.S. Devonshire (D02) in Portsmouth 29th June 1984, prior to use as a target.
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Netleyned

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #403 on: July 17, 2013, 06:31:42 PM »

I, for one would lime to see the thread carry on.
I would say a lot of us have learned a lot more
about the maritime history of the World.
If this message s because of the other issue, I think
your query has increased the Zip Wire fund so that
can't be bad. Keep Calm and Carry  On Posting.
If this is the end then thanks for the education and
entertainment Andy

Ned
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Norseman

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #404 on: July 17, 2013, 07:24:22 PM »

I have to say this is a very enjoyable and informative thread Andy. It would be a real pity to see it go west so I do hope you have a good rethink.

Meanwhile forget the executive stress toys, get http://www.ebay.com/itm/Halloween-Voodoo-10-Doll-Complete-Kit-Includes-Doll-Pins-Marker-Photo-Slot-/140792015924  %)  Seriously though, this life's way too short for negative vibes - very bad for the old ticker and for membership numbers too.

Dave
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Bob K

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #405 on: July 17, 2013, 09:08:04 PM »

Andy:  I and I am sure many have really appreciated the time and research you have put in building this thread, which I always find intensely interesting.  Many of your topics I often Google afterwards for further information.
 
I quite understand if it has become an overbearing task, but it is certainly not a thankless one.
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warspite

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #406 on: July 17, 2013, 10:41:22 PM »

If you finally do decide that is enough, it will be a sad day, as I have come to appreciate the vast history that goes untold on maritime history, too much is fixated on current events (the past 100 years for instance), our world heritage should be enjoyed by as many as possible - too much enphasis is given to the digital age nowadays.
 
We all understand if it becomes too much and thank you for the insight you have given us, now where's me coffee, I need a fix of some kind to compensate. :}
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pugwash

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #407 on: July 18, 2013, 01:13:03 PM »

Andy I have enjoyed this subject and appreciate the work you have put into it.
I do hope you continue if it isn't too much of a bind for you
Geoff
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Tug-Kenny

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #408 on: July 18, 2013, 04:26:59 PM »


If anyone else has any interesting facts then feel free to put them on here, relative to that day in History.

Thank you

Ken

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derekwarner

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #409 on: July 24, 2013, 12:54:28 AM »

Andy....as others have recently noted ........this has been an amazing & interesting thread  :-))
I too hope you carry on with it O0 ......Derek
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Martin [Admin]

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #410 on: July 24, 2013, 02:42:16 AM »


Unfortunately, Andy has left the Forum. Pity He put so much effort into this excellent Topic.
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warspite

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #411 on: July 24, 2013, 08:03:44 AM »

Really sad day. <:( {:-{ :-X
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Bob K

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #412 on: July 24, 2013, 08:46:27 AM »

It is with great sadness that we now look in vain for further installments of this Five Star thread.
My very best wishes to Andy, and many thanks for his enthralling historical journey.
IMO worthy of compiling as a published book.
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surfs up

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #413 on: July 24, 2013, 11:49:27 AM »


Not wanting to take over from Andy, just playing a little homage to him. Here are few items from this day.
 
1823 - In Maracaibo, Venezuela takes place the naval Battle of Lake Maracaibo, where the Admiral José Prudencio Padilla, defeated the Spanish Armada, thus culminating the independence for the Gran Colombia
1915 – The passenger ship S.S. Eastland capsizes while tied to a dock in the Chicago River. A total of 844 passengers and crew are killed in the largest loss of life disaster from a single shipwreck on the Great Lakes.

    1963 – The Bluenose II was launched in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. The schooner is a major    Canadian symbol


 
  • 2009
The MV Arctic Sea is a merchant vesselcargo ship, formerly registered in Malta that was reported as missing between late July and mid August 2009 en route from Finland to Algeria. On July 24, the Arctic Sea, manned by a Russian crew and carrying a cargo of what was declared to consist solely of timber, was allegedly boarded by hijackers off the coast of Sweden. The incident was not immediately reported, and contact with the ship was apparently lost on, or after, July 30. The Arctic Sea did not arrive at its scheduled port in Algeria, and on August 14 the ship was located near Cape Verde instead. On August 17 it was seized by the Russian Navy. An investigation into the incident is underway amidst speculation regarding the ship's actual cargo, and allegations of a cover-up by Russian authorities. The Arctic Sea was towed into harbour in the Maltese capital of Valletta on October 29, 2009.
The ship's hijacking and subsequent events remain mysterious as no credible explanation exists of its disappearance and Russia's conduct during and after capturing the ship. If confirmed to be an act of piracy, the hijacking of Arctic Sea would be the first known of its kind in Northern European waters for centuries.
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derekwarner

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #414 on: July 24, 2013, 12:17:13 PM »

Fellow Mayhemers........
  • I do understand & respect that a  member may choose to leave the forum........OK.....having said this.... >>:-(
  • I do not understand why images previously posted & locked into our WEB site are now listed as unavailable, & other images are now presented  upside down or sidewise <*<
  • Some 26,788  hits to this individual WEB thread within Model Mayhem & then nothing??????????????????
Am I missing something?............... >:-o .......Derek
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Shipmate60

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #415 on: July 24, 2013, 01:20:49 PM »

It looks like Andy has decided to cull his picture hosting albums.


Bob
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Neil

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #416 on: July 24, 2013, 05:54:43 PM »

I can't understand why andy has done this.
 
we have spoken many times via email and pm's and I have always found him a good and decent chap.
 
But if he has fallen out with some and decided to leave, the only ones hurt by his removal of photos and postings are the many members of the site who will miss both him and his excellent postings.
 
if you are watching as a guest, Andy I do hope you reconsider, and come back.
 
I don't know what the spat is about unless it's something that he sent me a pm about (by mistake I think, and that's why I didn't comment) but most pms between us were general banter and us both moaning about this and that, so can't see why he has gone.
 
neil.
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Rottweiler

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #417 on: July 24, 2013, 09:21:40 PM »

I would like to add my comments also.Andy,MOST people on here found your postings informative and interesting.
If you have given up because of a  few bad comments,then dont take them to heart.By giving up,you have let them win,and that would only add to their large ego. Dont let him(them) beat you,and come back into the fold please?
PS I did look where you mentioned,love it!
Sincerely,
Mick F
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Netleyned

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #418 on: July 24, 2013, 09:33:07 PM »

Looked in the same place  :-)) :-)) {-) {-)

Ned
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derekwarner

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #419 on: July 25, 2013, 05:34:28 AM »

Yes......  :o  ....also looked in the same place  ........woolie baaaaah           ......Derek  {-)
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peter c

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #420 on: July 25, 2013, 08:29:42 AM »

I don't plan to take over from Andy, his posts on this subject were most impressive and will be missed, but I have found this item.


July 25th 1956


45 miles of the coast of Nantucket Island, the Italian liner Andrea Doria was struck by the Swedish liner Stockholm during thick fog, 1660 passengers and crew from the Andrea Doria were rescued before it sunk.
The Swedish liner Stockholm's bow was damaged and assisted in rescuing the survivors.


Regards


Peter
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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #421 on: July 29, 2013, 08:43:15 PM »

Finally managed to re-locate my reference material. 
   Monday, 29th July 1940   
'SS Gronland' (1,264t) a former Danish steamer, Blyth to Plymouth was sunk by German aircraft in Dover Harbour.
 
 
'SS Clan Monro' (5,952t) steamer, Cochin, India to the Tees was sunk by a mine off Harwich.
 
 
'SS Moidart' (1,262t) steamer, London to Newcastle was also sunk by a mine off Harwich.
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #422 on: July 29, 2013, 09:07:43 PM »

The East Coast of England must have been the worst place to sail during the two wars.
Thanks for the education Ray.

Ned
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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #423 on: July 29, 2013, 10:52:07 PM »


The East Coast of England must have been the worst place to sail during the two wars.
Thanks for the education Ray.

Ned
When I was sailing in this area I had the local admiralty charts from the Tyne to St Abbs Head
and there are reckoned to be in excess of 150 wrecks listed most of which come from the WWI and
WWII
Geoff
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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #424 on: July 30, 2013, 08:40:22 PM »

Ned and Geoff - thank you for your comments.
 
I've not done any further searches on the previously mentioned vessels but I'm sure there will be lots more info accessible on-line.
 
 
 Wednesday, 30th July 1941   
 
'SS Adams Beck' (2,816t) just starting off on a voyage from the Tyne to London with a cargo of coal, when she was attacked and sunk by enemy bombers off the Tyne, one mile from 20c Buoy.
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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