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Author Topic: This Day In 'Boating' History  (Read 159987 times)

Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #425 on: August 01, 2013, 08:53:04 PM »

Friday, 1st August 1941  15.30.. Off Northumberland coast.. Farne Islands.. Three HEs Longstone Lighthouse [NU246389]. Two made direct hits on the turret and engine room, both badly damaged. All doors and windows blown in, kitchen badly damaged. Plane dipped its wings when passing over (a signal of acknowledgement to the lighthouse keeper, as made by friendly planes) and three objects were then seen to drop from the plane followed by two explosions. Lighthouse men landed at Seahouses by Holy Island Lifeboat. Search for UXB found nothing - possible two of the three bombs exploded together.
 
 
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #426 on: August 02, 2013, 10:55:02 PM »

Friday, 2nd August 1940
 
The Hull registered 'SS Highlander' (1,000t) cargo vessel, steamed into Aberdeen with a Heinkel He 115 seaplane draped across her stern. The ship had just survived a bombing attack and the aircraft had turned to rake her with machine-gun fire. While doing so, the enemy had come just a little bit too close and was hit by the ship's gunners. It crashed in flames into the sea about 100 yards astern of the 'Highlander'.
The gunners were celebrating this 'kill' when another Heinkel He 115 suddenly turned up. After making several passes it attacked, dropping bombs which missed. It too was caught by machine-gun fire on the turn; it lost height and its port wing hit the 'Highlander's' port lifeboat and swung the plane around on to the poop deck. It caught fire and the ship's crew put it out. There were no survivors from either plane.
The 'Highlander' was the first merchantman to bring down a German plane with its Lewis guns. The ship was renamed in an attempt to avoid repercussions but it was later sunk by aerial torpedo off Aberdeen, going down with all hands.
 
 Saturday, 2nd August 1941
 
'SS Trident' (4,317t) just ending a voyage from Montreal to the UK was sunk by German aircraft in the River Tyne.
 
 Sunday, 2nd August 1942
 
'SS Flora II' (1,218t) cargo ship, Reykjavik to Hull, was sunk by U 254, S of Iceland.
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #427 on: August 03, 2013, 08:38:23 PM »

Saturday, 3rd August 1940 'SS Wychwood' (2,794t) cargo ship, Blyth to London with a cargo of coal was sunk by a mine off Aldeburgh.
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #428 on: August 06, 2013, 10:27:07 PM »

Wednesday, 6th August 1941   
 
Six cargo ships, each of them carrying coal from the Tyne to London, and an escorting trawler in a south-bound convoy ran aground on the Haisborough Sands, off Cromer, the naval trawler 'Agate' and 'SS Betty Hindley', sailing from the Tyne to London were lost.
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #429 on: August 10, 2013, 11:05:54 PM »

Monday, 10th August 1942   
 
'SS Empire Reindeer' (6,259t) cargo ship, Montreal to Hull, was sunk by U 660, S of Iceland.
 Empire Reindeer Empire Reindeer was a 6,259 GRT (9,600 DWT) cargo ship which was built by Federal Shipbuilding Co, Kearney, New Jersey. Completed as Clarion for USSB. To MoWT in 1941 and renamed Empire Reindeer. Torpedoed on 10 August 1942 and sunk by U-660 at  5700′N 2230′W / 57.000N 22.500W / 57.000; -22.500 while a member of Convoy SC 94.
 
 

Regards,
 
Ray.
 
 
 
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #430 on: August 11, 2013, 07:41:19 PM »

Monday, 11th August 1941   
 
'SS Sir Russell' (1,548t) cargo ship, Sunderland to Southampton, was sunk by an E Boat (S-49) near Dungeness.
 
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Neil

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #431 on: August 15, 2013, 11:14:44 PM »

I was waiting for someone else to post this, but LEST WE FORGET
At dawn this day 71 years ago ( August 15th 1942) on the day of the Feast of the Assumption, the remainder of the ships of Operation Pedestal arrived in Grand Harbour, Valletta, Malta after suffering constant air attack from both Nazi and  Italian aircraft bombings and torpedoes.
 
Amongst them strapped to (initially) two destroyers and guided in by two Tugs, the SS Ohio, the tanker carrying thousands of gallons of petrol and aviation fuel made port after suffering constant bombardment.
 
They were given the "Sound Alert" usually only given to HM warships.
 
Only 5 merchantmen remained of the 14 that set out from Gibraltar on August 9th
 
Some historians say that her godly and timely arrival changed the course of the war in Northern Africa.
 
God bless them all for their deliverance.
 
neil
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #432 on: August 18, 2013, 07:36:19 PM »

Sunday, 18th August 1940   
 
 
'SS Ampleforth' (4,576t) steamer, Hull to Jacksonville was sunk by U 101 in the North-western Approaches. Nine of her crew were killed.
 
 
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Ray.
 
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #433 on: August 23, 2013, 11:15:55 PM »

Friday, 23rd August 1940   
 
 
'SS Severn Leigh' (5,242t) steamer, Hull to St John, New Brunwick, Canada was torpedoed by U 37, S of Iceland.
 
At 12.50 hours on 23 Aug, 1940, the Severn Leigh (Master Robert George Hammett, OBE), dispersed from convoy OA-200 on 20 August, was hit in the bow by one torpedo from U-37 south of Iceland. The ship had been spotted at 11.45 hours the day before and missed with a first torpedo at 18.22 hours. During the chase, the Keret was sighted and sunk before the U-boat again located the ship at 08.15 hours on 23 August.
When the crew abandoned ship in four lifeboats, Oehrn observed how the stern gun was manned and they heard how the radio operator sent distress signals, so he decided to surface and to silence the radio with the deck gun and to accelerate the sinking with shots into the waterline. Unfortunately two of the lifeboats were still alongside of the ship when the U-boat opened fire and were hit by shrapnel from the shells that exploded on the hull and killed almost all occupants. 32 crew members and one gunner were lost. The master and nine crew members made landfall at Leverburgh, South Uist on 5 September.
The master Robert George Hammett was awarded the Lloyds War Medal for bravery at sea.
 
The above information was extracted from http://www.uboat.net/allies/merchants/473.html
 
which was also contained on here:http://worldwar2daybyday.blogspot.co.uk
 
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #434 on: August 24, 2013, 09:29:51 PM »

Saturday, 24th August 1940   
 
 
'SS Blairmore' (4,141t) steamer, Newcastle, New Brunswick, Canada to the Tyne with pit-props, was sunk by U 37 in the North Atlantic.
SS Blairmore was a British Cargo Steamer built in 1928 and of 4,141 tons. She was owned by NISBET & CO, GEORGE. CLYDESDALE NAVIGATION CO LTD. On the 25th August 1940 when on route from NEWCASTLE N.B, and SYDNEY S.S for THE TYNE carrying 1500 fathoms of pit props she was torpedoed by U-37 and sunk. 4 crew lost from a total crew of 34.   
ref. used    
ubootwaffe
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Regards,
 
Ray.
 
 
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Nordsee

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #435 on: September 26, 2013, 04:27:23 PM »

A sad comment, I posted the news on the 22 May of this year of the ex Channel Ferry, "Maid of Kent" and her destruction in Dieppe Harbour while collecting seriously wounded  , after her conversion to an Hospital Ship.
 I must sadly add, that two weeks ago, the last surviving Crew member of that attack, Doug Hunter, passed away. He was 94, a lovely man, one of the best, he will be sadly missed, by so many. At his funeral there were over 100 mourners. Bye Doug, rest in peace.
 
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