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Author Topic: This Day In 'Boating' History  (Read 159763 times)

Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #50 on: January 10, 2013, 12:59:00 AM »

Sunday, 10th January 1943   'SS Ocean Vagabond' (7,174t) cargo ship, Botwood, Canada, to Hull, was sunk by U 186, S of Iceland.
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 10th
« Reply #51 on: January 10, 2013, 08:54:59 PM »

January 10th...

1839: The first commercial consignment of tea from India became available in Britain. Previously, the nation had only seen tea from China.
Eight chests (about 350 lbs) of tea from the Assam region of India were put under the hammer at the Commercial rooms in Mincing Lane, London. All the lots were bought by one Captain Pidding for the extraordinary price of 34 shillings per pound!

1906: Reginald Aubrey Fessenden, the Canadian inventor who performed pioneering experiments in radio, achieves another milestone when the first two-way transatlantic radio telegraphy transmission takes place between Fessenden's stations at Brant Rock, MA, and Machrihanish, Scotland.

1911: Two German light-cruisers, SMS Emden and SMS Nurnberg, suppress a native revolt on the island of Pohnpei in the German Caroline Islands. After shelling rebel fortifications with their main batteries, they send an armed landing party ashore to capture the stronghold.

1912: The world's first flying-boat is unveiled by it's designer by Glenn Curtiss, at Hammondsport. New York. Unlike existing hydro-aeroplanes or seaplanes (which were simply landplanes with floats substituted for wheels), Curtiss' revolutionary design combined elements of a boat hull into a purpose-designed fuselage, granting the aircraft buoyancy.
Although No.1 was unable to take off, the experiment indicated to Curtiss, that the flying-boat concept was practicable.

Flying Boat No.1 - Hammondsport, NY. 1912 

1920: The Treaty of Versailles becomes effective, officially ending World War I.
Included amongst a list of military restrictions, German naval forces will be limited to 15,000 men, six battleships (no more than 10,000 tons displacement each), six cruisers (no more than 6,000 tons displacement each), 12 destroyers (no more than 800 tons displacement each) and 12 torpedo boats (no more than 200 tons displacement each). No submarines are to be included
Blockades on ships are also prohibited

1941: While escorting Operation Excess convoys east of Sicily, British Aircraft Carrier, HMS Illustrious was attacked by Axis Savoia-Marchetti SM.79 and Junkers Ju 87 bombers. She was hit by six bombs and suffered extensive damage. Her sick bay and ward room were destroyed, and among those killed was the English rugby player W. G. E. Luddington.

1951: 13 days after she got into difficulties, Flying Enterprise sinks. (See following reply)

1964: Panama breaks ties with the U.S. and demands a revision of the canal treaty.

1965: The second version of the Polaris missile (A-2) is launched from Cape Canaveral. Physically larger than the first version (A-1), it has an increased range and the abliity to carry a larger warhead.
 
1992: 29,000 plastic bath toys (ducks, beavers frogs and turtles) are released when their container is washed off a Chinese cargo ship into the Pacific Ocean. The Friendly Floatees subsequently provide an unparalled set of data for researchers with an interest in ocean circulation. See also: Daily Mail Rubber Duck Article - 2007

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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - Flying Enterprise
« Reply #52 on: January 10, 2013, 09:00:01 PM »

Jan 10th 1951:

Almost two weeks after she got into difficulties, SS Flying Enterprise finally sinks, 31 nautical miles south of The Lizard and 41 nautical miles from Falmouth.

Captain Kurt Carlsen remained aboard throughout the ordeal, and was joined by Kenneth Dancy from Jan 4th. Together, they had secured towline after towline with the hope of bringing Flying Enterprise back to Falmouth in one piece.

In recognition of his contribution, Capt Carlsen was awarded a Lloyd's Silver Medal for Meritorious Service and received a ticker-tape parade in New York City on January 17, 1952.
Kenneth Dancy, was awarded a medal for Industrial Heroism by the Daily Herald and an illuminated citation from the American Institute of Marine Underwriters.

However, Carlsen's determination to stay on board, combined with the rapid appearance & continued presence of the U.S. Navy, and the massive effort involved in trying to save the severely stricken vessel, led to speculation that Flying Enterprise was carrying a shipment of zirconium intended for use in the reactor of the first nuclear submarine, USS Nautilus (SSN-571).

In 1960, $210,000 of the $800,000-worth of cargo was salvaged from Flying Enterprise by an Italian company, but under a confidentiality clause in the salvage contract, further details of the recovered cargo were not released.

According to a documentary on the subject, in 2002 information regarding the cargo is still regarded as confidential and details are not available from the CIA, FIA, Coast Guard and/or US Navy.


See Also:
Model Boat Mayhem; This Day In 'Boating' History - December 29th
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Flying_Enterprise
http://www.divernet.com/Wrecks/159162/secrets_of_the_flying_enterprise.html
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 11th
« Reply #53 on: January 11, 2013, 04:50:06 PM »

January 11th...

1863: In the American Civil War, disguised Confederate commerce raider CSS Alabama encounters and sinks the first USS Hatteras, a 1,126-ton side-wheel steamer, off Galveston Lighthouse, Texas.

1866: With 239 persons plus a great deal of cargo on board, Steamship London was dangerously overloaded when she ran into a storm and sank in the Bay of Biscay en route to Melbourne, Australia from Gravesend in England.
19 survivors escaped from the foundering ship by lifeboat, leaving 220 to perish.
Publicity relating to the manner of the disaster was to play a key role in Samuel Plimsoll's campaign to reform shipping, eventually leading Parliament to establish the famous Plimsoll Line (below) on the hulls of all ships.


11 Jan 1941: During the night, 16 British aircraft from Scampton, Lincolnshire attacked battleship Tirpitz at Wilhelmshaven, Germany to little effect.

1962: While Soviet submarine B-37, a Project 641 or Foxtrot-class, is tied to its pier in Ekaterininsky bay of the Polarny naval base, a fire breaks out in the torpedo compartment and sets off eleven torpedoes on board.
The submarine is instantly destroyed by a massive explosion, which hurls B-37's anchor nearly 2 kilometers (1.2 mi) from the dock, and severely damages S-350, a Project 633 or Romeo-class submarine, that is tied-up alongside B-37.
In total, 122 people were killed: 59 B-37 crewmen, 19 S-350 crewmen, and 44 others.
 
2000: Seven young crewmen lost their lives when their vessel, the scallop dredger Solway Harvester, capsized and sank in heavy storms off the coast of Ramsey, Isle of Man.
A rescue mission was scrambled but it was called off on 12th January after two unopened liferafts were found.
The wreck of the Solway Harvester was found on 15th January, lying on her starboard side in 35m (115ft) of water. The bodies of all seven crew were on board. BBC News - The Solway Harvester Tragedy

Solway Harvester (c.1992). Image source: www.trawlerpictures.net
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 12th
« Reply #54 on: January 12, 2013, 06:01:55 PM »

January 12th...

1807: A ship carrying 37.000 pounds of gunpowder explodes as it navigates through the city of Leiden, Netherlands. 151 people were killed, over 2000 were injured and some 220 homes were destroyed.

1813: US Frigate Chesapeake captures the British merchant ship HMS Volunteer in the Atlantic and sends her into Portsmouth as a prize.

1836: HMS Beagle anchored at Sydney Cove, Australia at Port Jackson, beginning Charles Darwin’s short acquaintance with Australia.

1899: Having lost her steering gear and dragging her anchor, 13 crew members and 5 apprentices are rescued from the stricken 1,900-ton three-masted schooner Forrest Hall off the North Somerset coast, United Kingdom, by the crew of Louisa, the Lynmouth Lifeboat.
Due to the terrible weather, it had not been possible to launch Louisa from Lynmouth, so she was taken by road to Porlock's sheltered harbour 13 miles around the coast, and launched from there instead. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynmouth

1908: A long-distance radio message is sent from the Eiffel Tower, France, for the first time.

1913: Kiel and Wilhelmshaven become submarine bases in Germany.

1930: Reine des Cieux, a French ketch broke free from her moorings in Torbay. The three crew were rescued by the Padstow Lifeboat, before she came ashore at Bridport, Dorset and broke up.

1937: A plough for laying submarine cables is patented patented. The invention relates to a novel method of, and apparatus for, laying a submarine cable in a trench of predetermined depth in the bed of the ocean or other body of deep water.  See the original document, description and diagrams at http://www.freepatentsonline.com/2067717.html

1950: HMS Truculent (P315), a T-class submarine, sinks in the Thames estuary after colliding with the Swedish oil tanker Divina. A total of 64 people died, most in freezing cold mid-winter conditions after escaping the collision.

1953: Landings tested on board USS Antietam an Essex-class aircraft carrier, after major alterations had converted her into the world's first, true, angled-deck aircraft carrier.


1971: John Tovey died. English Royal Navy admiral (b.1885).

2004: Queen Mary 2 set sail on her maiden voyage from Southampton, UK, to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, in the United States, carrying 2,620 passengers under the command of captain Ronald Warwick.


2006 – Decommissioned French aircraft carrier Clemenceau is barred access to the Suez Canal by Egyptan aurthorities, after Greenpeace activists had boarded it, claiming it contained hundreds of tons of toxic waste that France intended to dump in India.
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 13th
« Reply #55 on: January 12, 2013, 11:04:56 PM »

January 13th...

1621: Dutch merchant Jan Pieterszoon Coen's fleet sets sail on a punitive expedition against the Bandanese in East Indonesia, who had been trading with the English.

1797: Off the coast of Brittany, a naval engagement takes place between Le Droits de l'Homme, a 74-gun French ship of the line, and two British frigates, the 44-gun HMS Indefatigable and the 36-gun HMS Amazon.
The frigates outmanoeuvre the much larger French vessel which is driven ashore in heavy seas, resulting in the death of over 900 of the 1,300 seamen aboard.
One of the British frigates was also lost after failing to escape a lee shore and running onto a sandbank.
 
1840: The steamship Lexington burns and sinks four miles off the coast of Long Island after the casing around a smoke stack catches fire, igniting nearly 150 bales of cotton stored nearby.
Of the estimated 143 people on board the Lexington, only four survived, having clung to large bales of cotton which had been thrown overboard.

1937: HMS Illustrious, a Royal Navy aircraft carrier is ordered, to be built by Vickers-Armstrong at Barrow-in-Furness.
 
1942: German U-boats begin harassing shipping on the United States east coast. They target tankers and freighters to disrupt the delivery of supplies and lower morale by sinking ships within sight of American civilians
 
1969: The Beatles Yellow Submarine Album is released in the USA.


1976: Argentina ousts a British envoy in their dispute over the Falkland Islands.

2012: after the Costa Concordia cruise ship ran aground with more than 4,000 passengers and crew on 13 January, only hours after leaving the Italian port of Civitavecchia. Thirty-two people are known to have died.
See also: BBC News & Graphics. Costa Concordia disaster

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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #56 on: January 13, 2013, 01:14:54 AM »

Tuesday, 13th January 1942   'SS Lerwick' (5626t) while inbound to the Tyne from London, was attacked by enemy aircraft, and sank off Robin Hood's Bay with the loss of five lives. She was built in 1938. To date she has not been located.
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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ardarossan

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #57 on: January 13, 2013, 02:14:38 PM »

1813: The frigate USS Chesapeake captures British cargo brig Liverpool Hero. Boarding teams transfer Liverpool Hero’s company to Volunteer (captured 12th Jan), her main mast is taken to replace one of Chesapeake's main top masts that had been destroyed in a storm days prior, and then the Americans put Liverpool Hero to the torch.
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 14th
« Reply #58 on: January 14, 2013, 01:13:11 AM »

January 14th...

1878: Alexander Graham Bell demonstrates the telephone for Queen Victoria at Osborne House, Isle of Wight, UK.

1911: Roald Amundsen's expedition, on board the ship, Fram, arrives in The Bay of Whales, Antarctica, a natural ice harbour indenting the front of Ross Ice Shelf. Here they establish a temporary base which Amundsen names Framheim.
Fram is preserved at the Fram Museum in Oslo, Norway.
 
FRAM (Forward)

1911: The USS Arkansas (BB-33), one of the two Wyoming-class dreadnought battleships, is launched from the yards of the New York Shipbuilding Corp.

1942: The Panama-flagged tanker SS Norness, was sunk by torpedoes from U-123 about 60 miles from Montauk Point, Long Island.

1943: In the first submarine resupply mission, USS Gudgeon (SS-211) lands 6 men, 2000 pounds of equipment, and supplies on Catmon Point, Negros Island, Western Visayas, Philippines

1969: USS Enterprise (CVN-65), the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, was badly damaged whilst conducting air-operations off Hawaii. A massive fire starts after a Zuni rocket accidentally explodes under the wing of an F-4J. Some of the subsequent 18 explosions were 500lb bombs cooking-off in multiples, leaving 20-foot holes in the armoured flight deck.
Losses totalled 28 dead, 343 wounded, and 15 aircraft destroyed.

USS Enterprise - January 14 1969

1993: Jan Heweliusz, a Polish Ro-Ro ferry with 64 passengers & crew on board, capsized and sank in 27 metres of water off Cape Arcona on the coast of Rügen in the Baltic Sea. The accident claimed the lives of 20 crewmen and 35 passengers. 9 crewmen were rescued. 10 bodies were never found.
To-date, the sinking of Jan Heweliusz is the most deadly peacetime maritime disaster involving a Polish ship.

2012: Two survivors are found trapped inside the capsized cruise ship Costa Concordia, the day after she ran aground and capsized off the coast of Tuscany.

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heritorasphodel

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #59 on: January 14, 2013, 01:29:34 AM »

14th January 1991, West Kirby RNLI take the term 'Inshore Lifeboat' a bit too literally when they are called a boy and his dog who had fallen into a park lake in Liverpool. With the temperature well below 0, police and firemen couldn't reach the casualty who had fallen through ice while trying to cross the lake so the Police contacted the Coastguard who in turn contacted the Honorary Secretary at West Kirby. With a police escort, the D class lifeboat was towed to the middle of Liverpool, where it took eight men to lift her over the railings surrounding the park. With two of the crew using their boots as ice breakers, ten minutes later the casualty was safely back on land and within an hour the boat was home.


Bob Jones, the Hon. Sec., told a newspaper: "This was an unusual call, but we're not called an inshore lifeboat for nothing!"


Andrew
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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 15th
« Reply #60 on: January 15, 2013, 03:29:22 PM »

January 15th...
 
1493: Christopher Columbus steers away from the coast of the New World and heads out to sea for Spain. Possibly reflecting on the manatee incident (9th Jan), and hoping that What happened in Dominica, stays in Dominica

1559: Elizabeth I of England is crowned Queen of England in Westminster Abbey by Owen
Oglethorpe, the Bishop of Carlisle, instead of the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Queen E

1815: The frigate USS President tries to break out of New York Harbour, but is intercepted by a squadron of British frigates, surrendering after a battle with HMS Endymion.

1833: HMS Beagle anchors in Goeree Roads, Tierra del Fuego, during her second voyage & survey expedition (27 December 1831 to 2 October 1836).
 
1865: Fort Fisher, North Carolina, falls to the Union, thus cutting off the last major seaport of the Confederacy.

1940: German U-44 torpedoes Dutch cargo ship MV Arendskerk (below)as she was passing through the Bay of Biscay, carrying a cargo of galvanised sheets, nails, brass tubes, from Rotterdam & Antwerp, to Durban. All the crew were saved.

Cropped lo-res image. Original at http://www.photoship.co.uk

1942: Heading out from New York to the UK, SS Coimbra, a 6,768 ton British tanker carrying 9,000 tons of lubricating oil, was sunk off Cape Hatteras after being torpedoed by German U-123. 36 crew were lost, from a total of 46.

1948: Josephus Daniels died. American publisher and U.S. Secretary of the Navy (b. 1862)

1986: The Living Seas opens at World Showcase in EPCOT Center, Walt Disney World, Florida.
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 16th
« Reply #61 on: January 16, 2013, 05:54:26 AM »

January 16th...

1873: The Royal Naval College, Greenwich, is established by Order-in-Council.

1909: During the Nimrod Expedition (1907-1909), one of Ernest Shackleton's polar exploration teams, Edgeworth David, Douglas Mawson, and Alistair Mackay, discover the approximate location of the South Magnetic Pole   

1941: As aircraft carrier, HMS Illustrious (87) is undergoing repairs in Malta, to damage sustained during German & Italian dive-bomb attacks a few days earlier, she comes under attack and is bombed again.
 
Damage to the deck of HMS Illustrious

1941: During the night of the 16th January, two RAF Handley Page Hampden's (of eight that took off) from RAF Waddington, Lincolnshire, attacked battleship Tirpitz to little effect.

2001: MV Jessica, an Ecuadorian oil supply tanker ran aground just 800 yards off the coast of San Cristobal in the Galapgos  Islands. Over the next few days she releases 160,000 gallons of oil into the Islands' biologically rich waters.
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ardarossan

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #62 on: January 16, 2013, 06:27:11 PM »

A few more from January 16th...

1362: Rungholt, a wealthy city in Nordfriesland, in the Danish duchy of Schleswig, sank beneath the waves when a storm tide in the North Sea tore through the area.

1780: The naval Battle of Cape St Vincent took place under moonlight, off the southern coast of Portugal during the American War of Independence. A British fleet under Admiral Sir George Rodney, on board HMS Sandwich, defeated a Spanish squadron under Don Juan de Lángara.


1832: HMS Beagle arrived at the Cape Verde Islands and anchored at Porto Praya, Santiago (Second voyage & survey expedition from 27 Dec 1831 - 2 Oct 1836).

1887: The entire north wing of the 'Cliff House tavern', San Fransico, was completely demolished, after the schooner, Parallel, ran aground and her 40-ton cargo of dynamite exploded. The blast was heard a hundre miles away.

1911: The 37-foot Australian ketch Pandora becomes the first 2-man sailboat to round Cape Horn west to east.

1944: The first shipboard-helicopter anti-submarine mission is flown by Lieutenant, (Jr Grade) Stewart R. Graham, USCG, in a Royal Navy R-4B (HNS-1) from a temporary 60ft x 80ft flight deck aboard British freighter "Daghestan. The 30-minute flight yakes place near the Azores in an Altlantic convoy en route from New York to Liverpool, England.

A Sikorsky R-4 Hoverfly

1973: USSR's Lunakhod 2 begins radio-controlled exploration of the Moon.

1974: Peter Benchley's "Jaws" is published.

"Amity Island had everything. Clear skies. Gentle surf. Warm water.
People flocked there every summer. It was the perfect feeding ground."
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #63 on: January 17, 2013, 01:00:55 AM »

Saturday, 16th January 1943   'SS Long Bird' (636t) sank in deep water, 10 miles E of Blyth at 55°06'39"N - 01°13'08"W.
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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BrianB6

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #64 on: January 17, 2013, 06:50:21 AM »

Thursday 17th January 2013
From the ABC news:-
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-01-17/us-navy-ship-runs-aground-off-philippines/4469864
A United States navy minesweeper, the USS Guardian, has run aground in the Sulu Sea off the Philippines and is stuck on a reef.    The navy says no-one was injured in the incident, which occurred at 2:25am (local time) on Tubbataha Reef about 130 kilometres east-southeast of Palawan Island.
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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 17th...
« Reply #65 on: January 17, 2013, 12:23:50 PM »

January 17th...

1524: The start of Giovanni da Verrazzano's voyage to find a passage to China.
 
1773: Captain James Cook, commanding HMS Resolution and Tobias Furneaux commanding companion ship HMS Adventure, are (amongst) the first to cross the Antarctic Circle as they circumnavigate the globe at a very high southern latitude (Second Voyage of Exploration 1772-1775)

1779: Captain James Cook's last known notation is made in his journal of the Third (and fated to be final) Voyage of Exploration (1776-1779). Cook once again commanding HMS Resolution, with Captain Charles Clerke commanding HMS Discovery.
 
1861: Flush toilet (with seperate water tank and a pull chain) patented by Mr Thomas Crapper.
 
1912: Robert Falcon Scott's 'Terra Nova' expedition party reaches the South Pole, the day after they discover that Amundsen had reached the pole first. Scott's anguish is indicated in his diary: “Great God! This is an awful place and terrible enough for us to have laboured to it without the reward of priority.”
 

1929: Popeye, the cartoon character created by Elzie Crisler Segar, makes his first appeared in the daily King Features comic strip "Thimble Theatre"
 
1930: The U.S. Navy aircraft carrier U.S.S. Lexington (CV-2) leaves Tacoma, having been tied-up to the Baker Dock for a month whilst her boilers supplied a quarter of Tacoma’s electricity, to meet a power crisis. Ref: When a giant ship powered Tacoma
 
1955: USS Nautilus (SSN-571), the world's first operational nuclear-powered submarine, put to sea for the first time and signaled her historic message, "Underway on nuclear power."

1969: The Beatles 'Yellow Submarine' album is released in UK
 
1969: According to the 1992 book RNLI Lifeboat Lyme Regis, by TK Faragher, lifeboatman Robert Jefford, aged 25, (known as Nimmer), lost his life when the inshore rescue boat capsized while helping the catamaran Karuna during storm conditions. His two colleagues survived. To date, 'Nimmer' remains the last serviceman lost on duty at Lyme Regis.

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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 18th
« Reply #66 on: January 18, 2013, 09:24:50 PM »

January 18th...

1671: Admiral Sir Henry Morgan, privateer & pirate, captures Panama from the Spanish.
 
1778: Captain James Cook discovers the Hawaiian Islands, naming them the 'Sandwich Islands' after the First Lord of the Admiralty, Lord Sandwich. (Third Voyage of Exploration 1776-1779)

1788: HMS Supply, an armed tender, is the first ship of the First Fleet to arrive at Botany Bay.
The First Fleet being the name given to the eleven ships that left Great Britain, carrying supplies, settlers and convicts, to Australia on 13th May 1787.

1884:  The passenger steamer City of Columbus ran aground on Devil’s Bridge off the Gay Head Cliffs in Aquinnah, Massachusetts. Wampanoag Indians braved the waves in rowboats along with the Revenue Cutter Dexter. Approximately 100 people froze to death or drowned, and 29 were saved.

1859: Alfred Lewis Vail died today. (September 25, 1807 - January 18, 1859) Machinist and inventor, Vail was central, with Samuel F. B. Morse, in developing and commercializing the telegraph between 1837 and 1844. He was also responsible for several technical innovations of Morse's system, particularly the sending key and improved recording registers and relay magnets.

1911: The first successful shipboard landing by an aircraft occurs when Eugene Ely touches down on USS Pennsylvania, anchored in San Francisco bay. The aircraft was fitted with an tail-hook, whilst USS Pennsylvania had been equipped with a small landing platform and a series of ropes to stop the aircraft. Therefore, the landing was the first ever using an arrestor-hook system.


Eugene Ely landing his Curtiss Pusher on USS Pennsylvania. 1911

1912: One day after reaching the South Pole, Robert F. Scott and his expedition find a tent that was erected by Roald Amundsen’s expedition five weeks earlier. The tent contained a note to Scott from Amundsen, asking that someone might inform King Haakon of Norway that he had indeed reached the pole should he not return home safely.

1913 (Jan 5th O.S.): A Greek flotilla defeats the Ottoman Navy in the Naval Battle of Lemnos during the First Balkan War, securing the islands of the Northern Aegean Sea for Greece.

1977: The Trident 1 (C-4) missile development flight test program commences, as the first missile (C4X-1) is launched suuccessfully from Cape Canaveral, Fl.
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Capt Podge

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #67 on: January 19, 2013, 12:41:07 AM »

Friday, 19th January 1940   The collier 'Mile End' (859t) was on a voyage from London to Sunderland in ballast when she was in collision with the armed trawler 'Faraday' off the Tees at 54°43'18"N - 01°05'12"W. Five of her crew were killed. She was built in 1911. She lies in 30 metres of water, on her side, her stern section intact.
 
 Sunday, 19th January 1941   'SS Bonnington Court' (4,909t) cargo ship, Harwich for the Tyne, sunk by German aircraft near the 'Sunk Lightvessel'
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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heritorasphodel

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #68 on: January 19, 2013, 06:31:17 AM »

19th January 1881: at 10:30, a telegram was received by the harbour master and Honorary secretary of the lifeboat at Whitby reporting that a ship had sunk off Robin Hood's Bay. The crew had taken to the ship's boat but had to drop anchor due to increasingly violent conditions. The wind was creating exceptionally heavy seas at Whitby, preventing the Lifeboat, the Robert Whitworth from sailing to the casualty, so it was decided to take the lifeboat overland to launch on the scene.


Over 200 men, including the crew, joined in clearing snow up to 7 feet deep for 6 miles on narrow roads. Finally they had to descend over 500 feet to the bay. After 2 hours the boat reached the bay, being pulled by 18 horses. The lifeboat was immediately launched despite the crew being very tired. After an hour, with broken oars and steering gear, they were forced to return and the call went out to double bank the oars. After an hour and a half, 6 survivors from the brig Visitor were landed. Several of the survivors and the crew needed medical attention, with one of the crew unable to return to Whitby for several days.


The rest of the crew went home by road, returning several days later to sail the Robert Whitworth back to Whitby.


Andrew
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 19th
« Reply #69 on: January 19, 2013, 07:49:58 PM »

January 19th...
 
1788: Convict transports, 'Alexander', 'Scarborough' and 'Friendship', are the second group of ships of the First Fleet, to arrive at Botany Bay.
The First Fleet is the name given to the 11 ships which sailed from Great Britain on 13 May 1787, to start the first European colony (a convict settlement) in New South Wales, Australia.

1839: The British East India Company lands Royal Marines at Aden to occupy the territory and stop attacks by pirates against British shipping to India.

1840: American naval officer and explorer, Captain Charles Wilkes, circumnavigates Antarctica, claiming what became known as Wilkes Land for the United States.


USS Vincennes in Disappointment Bay, Antarctica, during the Wilkes expedition.

1912: Robert Falcon Scott's deflated 'Terra Nova' expedition party begins the 800-mile return journey from the South Pole. The next day he wrote "I'm afraid the return journey is going to be dreadfully tiring and monotonous."

1941: Italian Adua-class submarine 'Neghelli' is sunk by destroyer HMS 'Greyhound' near Falkonera, Aegean Sea.

1941: British carrier, HMS 'Illustrious', is bombed for the second time in three days (and third time in nine), as she is being repaired in Malta. The repeated attacks have caused some flooding of her outer hull compartments and minor listing, but all her machinery spaces have remained intact.
 
1942: CNSS 'Lady Hawkins' was torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-66, 130 miles off the North Carolina coast. An estimated 251 people were killed in the sinking.


CNSS 'Lady Hawkins'

1943: The Italian submarine 'Tritone' was lost during her first mission, when she tried to attack an enemy convoy.
Spotted and depth charged by British destroyer HMS 'Antelope' and Canadian corvette 'Port Arthur'. She surfaced to avoid sinking and was shelled. She sank shortly after, taking 26 men with her. 25 survivors were rescued and taken prisoner by the British.

1947: While on a voyage from Thessoloniki to Piraeus, the Greek passenger ship SS 'Heimara' struck a wartime mine and sank off Gaidaros Island, with the loss of 392 of 637 aboard.


SS Heimara

1973: The BBC News announces that a 'Super Tug' has been sent to protect British trawlers from Icelandic patrol boats as the dispute over cod fishing rights intensifies. 'The Statesman', was not be armed but had orders to defend the British fishermen against tactics such as wire cutting.


The Statesman

1996: U.S. tug 'Scandia' has an engine-room fire while towing the unmanned U.S. tank barge 'North Cape', 4.5 miles off Point Judith, Rhode Island. In storm conditions, all six crewmembers escape without injury. An estimated 828,000 gallons of home heating oil was spilled.

Tug 'Scandia' and her tow, 'North Cape', aground off Rhode Island.
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Rottweiler

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #70 on: January 19, 2013, 10:58:09 PM »

the "Statesman" tug is a nice looking vessel,has anyone made a model of her?
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ardarossan

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Re: This Day In 'Boating' History
« Reply #71 on: January 20, 2013, 07:32:40 PM »

the "Statesman" tug is a nice looking vessel,has anyone made a model of her?

I don't have any info regarding models of the 'Statesman', but I know that during the Cod-fishing dispute, she was accompanied by another large tug, the 'Lloydsman' (below), which Kingston Mouldings produce a hull for. It's 48.5" long and 1:65 scale for anyone who may be interested.

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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 20th
« Reply #72 on: January 20, 2013, 09:17:48 PM »

January 20...

1788: The remaining seven ships of the First Fleet arrive at Botany Bay, comprising of Naval escort & Flagship, HMS 'Sirius'; Convict transports, 'Charlotte', 'Lady Penrhyn', & ' Prince of Wales'; and Supply transports, 'Golden Grove', 'Fishburn', & 'Borrowdale'.
The fleet was commanded by Captain (later Admiral) Arthur Phillip. Phillip soon decided that the site, chosen on the recommendation of Sir Joseph Banks, who had accompanied James Cook in 1770, was not suitable, since it had poor soil, no secure anchorage and no reliable water source. After some exploration Phillip decided to move the fleet on to Port Jackson.


A monument commemorating the landing of the First Fleet
Brighton-Le-Sands, Botany Bay in New South Wales

1841: Hong Kong Island is occupied by the British, during the First Opium War (1839 –1842). Ref: History of Hong Kong via Wikipaedia

1850: HMS Investigator under Commander Robert J. McClure (in his first Arctic command) and HMS Enterprise under Captain Richard Collinson, set sail from Plymouth, England, on a three-year mission to search for Sir John Franklin's lost expedition, "and not for the purposes of geographical or scientific research." Although a completion of the proposed Northwest Passage from the opposite direction would not be without merit... Also ref: McClure Arctic Expedition

1869: A lifeboat station is established in Lynmouth, five months after the nearby wreck of the sailing vessel 'Home'. The lifeboat was kept in a shed on the beach until a purpose-built boat house was built at the harbour. This was rebuilt in 1898 and enlarged in 1906-7

1887: On January 20, 1887, the United States Senate allowed the Navy to lease Pearl Harbour as a naval base. As a result, Hawaii obtained exclusive rights to allow Hawaiian sugar to enter the United States duty free.

1900: The 'Juliet' is the first boat to travel passes through the Chicago Drainage Canal, (also known as The Sanitary and Ship Canal). See: Jan 2nd and also http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/300054.html


Juliet, 1st boat to pass through the Chicago Drainage Canal - January 20th 1900

1909: The Midilli (formerly SMS Breslau) strikes five mines in quick succession after attacking several mall British ships near Kusu Bay, off Imbros. She sank rapidly, and of her complement of 370 only 14 officers and 148 men were picked up by the boats of the British destroyers which arrived during the latter part of the action.

1921: HMS K5 – A British K class submarine, was lost with all 57 crew members when she sank about 120 miles south-west of the Isles of Scilly, en route to a mock battle in the Bay of Biscay.
She had signalled that she was diving but didn't surface at the end of the exercise. After a battery cover and a sailor's "ditty box" were recovered, it was presumed that she had somehow exceeded her maximum depth.

2006: Witnesses report seeing a bottlenose whale swimming in the River Thames, the first time the species had been seen in the Thames since records began in 1913. According to the BBC, it was approximately 16ft long and weighed 24,000lbs.
River Thames Whale via Wikipaedia
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 21st
« Reply #73 on: January 21, 2013, 08:53:46 PM »

January 21st...

1795: Cornish navigator, Samuel Wallis died this day (23 Apr 1728 - 21 Jan 1795), in London.
In 1766, he was given command of HMS Dolphin and, accompanied by HMS Swallow under the command of Philip Carteret, was to circumnavigate the world, explore the South Pacific and search for the elusive Southern Continent (Terra Australis).
In 1780 Wallis was appointed Commissioner of the Admiralty.


1854: RMS Tayleur, the Charles Moore & Company iron-hull clipper ship, chartered by the White Star Line, ran aground ground and sank during her maiden voyage off Lambay Island, Dublin Bay. Of the 652 people on board 380 lives were lost, many of them immigrants.


1906: Brazilian battleship Aquidabã was a Brazilian ironclad warship built in the mid-1880s. On 21 January 1906, the powder magazines of the ship blew up, sinking the ship within three minutes. 212 people were killed.

1954: USS Nautilus, the world's first operational nuclear-powered submarine, was christened and launched into the Thames River at Groton Conn, sponsored by Mamie Eisenhower.


Launching USS Nautilus (SSN-571) - via US Navy

1968: An USAF B-52 bomber armed with four hydrogen bombs crashed near the Arctic air base of Thule in Greenland. The accident happened after the plane caught fire and the crew ejected. The aircraft evntually came down in North Star Bay, where it crashed through the sea-ice contaminating the area with aviation fuel and radiation.


A set of four B28FI thermonuclear bombs, similar to those
on board the B-52 which crashed at Thule
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ardarossan

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This Day In 'Boating' History - January 22nd
« Reply #74 on: January 22, 2013, 05:52:02 PM »

January 22nd...

1840: Jules Dumont d'Urville, French explorer, naval officer (later, rear admiral), leading an Antarctic expedition aboard the 'Astrolabe' and the 'Zelée', discovers Adélie Land, Antarctica and claims it for France.
His journal showing the date as 21st January 1840, since Dumont d'Urville forgot to add one day on his diary when he passed the 180° meridian from the east.

1873: Due to bad weather in the English Channel, the 'Northfleet', a Blackwall Frigate bound for Hobart, Tasmania, was at anchor approximately two to three miles off Dungeness. At around 10.30 pm, she was run down by a steamer (Murillo), that backed off and disappeared into the darkness, leaving the stricken sailing ship helpless. The heavily-laden Northfleet sank within 30 minutes. In the ensuing panic a total of 293 people were drowned.


1906: Shortly before midnight, SS 'Valencia' struck a reef near Pachena Point on the southwest coast of Vancouver Island and sank. According to the federal report, the official death toll was 136 persons. 37 men survived, but every woman and child on the Valencia died in the disaster.

1944: 'Operation Shingle' begins with allied troops under, Major General John P. Lucas, making an amphibious landing behind German lines of Anzio and Nettuno, Italy. The ensuing four-month combat became known as the Battle of Anzio.

1951: Canadian Tribal-class destroyer HMCS Huron (G24) G24/216, built by Vickers-Armstrongs on the River Tyne in UK, sails out from Halifax, Nova Scotia, for the first of two tours in the United Nations Korean war operations.
 
1984: After a recent refit, SS(MV) Karrabee, one of Sydney's wooden inner harbour ferry fleet, was participating in the Great Ferry Race on Sydney harbour, when she began taking on water and experiencing steering problems.
With crowds of people gathered at her bow there were even moments when the top of her hull was below water. Her captain returned her to Circular Quay and managed to get everyone off before she sank at her berth. Ref: http://ferriesofsydney.com/karrabee.html
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