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Author Topic: Sydney NSW  (Read 2088 times)

Bryan Young

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Sydney NSW
« on: May 16, 2007, 03:42:23 PM »

1. I believe taken in 1943...anyone name the ships? And why did some ships have an"R" or other unusual letters in front of the number?
2. The naval review of 1986. These were the "few" that were allocated an alongside berth.
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gingyer

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Re: Sydney NSW
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2007, 07:36:59 PM »

 
out board ship R56 - HMS Tuscan
http://www.uboat.net/allies/warships/ship/4217.html

inboard ship I44 - HMAS  Warramunga
http://www.uboat.net/allies/warships/ship/4439.html

Whats my prize ;D



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Bryan Young

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Re: Sydney NSW
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2007, 10:12:25 PM »


out board ship R56 - HMS Tuscan
http://www.uboat.net/allies/warships/ship/4217.html

inboard ship I44 - HMAS  Warramunga
http://www.uboat.net/allies/warships/ship/4439.html

Whats my prize ;D
How the hades did you know that? Now answer the Q on why they had "odd" letters. his is not a quiz! I really want to know as I have a few more to put on this site with"R" on them. The WW2 photos were "left" to me by my late father in law. I think he must have been a spy or something, but these and some future ones are originals and until I opened his box I never knew they existed.




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sweeper

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Re: Sydney NSW
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2007, 04:46:43 PM »

Re: the "R" numbers.
The pennant number system (I think also called flag superior) was a hang over of a mixed up system from pre-war and war years.
It would appear that the letters used ranged from D,F, G, H, I and R. At first I thought there may have been some connection to the class but on checking some of them, that idea has just crashed and burned.

The system was rationalised post war into what we have now (allowing for the fact that we may not have the ships to put the numbers on).
Aircraft carriers = R Cruisers = C Destroyers = D Frigates = F Submarines = S Minesweepers & hunters = M Minelayers = N
Landing ships = L Auxiliary ships = A (depot ships, tenders, survey vessels, Royal Yacht etc) Patrol boats = P
Ships transferred to Commonwealth navies sometimes retained R.N. numbers, those that went to Canada (for example) changed to the U.S. format such as DDE

From the info I have to hand, it would appear that a rationalisation programme was carried out late 40's into the 50's- perhaps to comply with NATO standards?
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DickyD

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Re: Sydney NSW
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2007, 05:02:33 PM »

 Pennants and Flag Superiors and Classes and Types
This subject seems designed to cause a headache! By 1914 Royal Navy ships were identified by Pennants, flags flown to identify themselves, this comprised a letter which was termed the "Flag Superior" since it flew uppermost, followed by a number. Smaller ships had their Pennant painted on the hull.

Unfortunately Pennant numbers kept changing, perhaps to confuse the enemy or more likely because administrators love swapping filing systems around.

Flag Superiors do not correspond to Class letters, except by coincidence. Destroyers in particular from the First World War tended to be classed by letter for each "run" of building, the letter was incremented in much the same way as car registration plates are. Hence from 1903 to 1905 a series of destroyers were built named after rivers and were Class "E", hence they would be termed either as River Class or E Class, but their Flag Superior would be D, H or P. With the outbreak of WWI all destroyers became "F" but later "G" was added as an option and then "H" and "D"

During WW2 "K" was introduced for Corvette, other letters included "U" for Sloop.

Post war the system was overhauled and Flag Superiors standardised so that each represented a single Class of ship:
 
A
 Auxilliary
B Battleship
C Cruiser
D Destroyer
F Frigate
M Minesweeper
N Minelayer
R Aircraft Carrier
S Submarine
H Hydrographic vessel
L Amphibious Warfare
P Fast Patrol Boat

This system came into force in June 1947, prior to that the "F" classification was only seen on Destroyers, Frigates would be U or K.

 

Richard ;)

Further info on http://www.middle-watch.co.uk/Classes.htm
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gingyer

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Re: Sydney NSW
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2007, 06:38:55 PM »

Well I would like to tell you that
it was because I am really smart but.......
I zoomed in to the pennant numbers and checked
them against ships on the uboat site  ;D

Colin
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DickyD

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Re: Sydney NSW
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2007, 09:13:24 PM »

Wonderful site that Uboat net I use it quite a lot.

Richard ;)
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gingyer

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Re: Sydney NSW
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2007, 09:44:55 PM »

I have to agree Richard
Its a very good and informative site.
At first I thought it was only on Uboats but once you
get into the web you can find a great deal of info on
warships from WW2.

Colin
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