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Author Topic: airbrush technique  (Read 3103 times)

boatmadman

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airbrush technique
« on: May 22, 2007, 05:09:59 AM »

Hi,

I want to paint a hydro in red,white and yellow. The white area I intend to be solid white, but the red and yellow I want to blend.

The question is - what is the best way of blending? Do I paint all yellow and then red over the top with the red getting less solid as I move over the yellow - or vice versa - or is there a better way?

Any suggestions/advice greatly appreciated.

Ian
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MCR

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2007, 04:03:27 PM »

Yellow first then red
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Voyager

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2007, 12:59:02 PM »

If you want to get flash, use a stretched out piece of blue-tac were you want the fade to begin, being flexible you don't have to keep to a straight line.
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slewis

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2007, 04:17:19 PM »

As voyager says or you can even get a roll of 3M soft edge masking (its a 1cm round foamstrip with a low tack adhesive along one side) then spray over the top of it at a constant angle and speed .

Shane
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boatmadman

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2007, 04:21:58 PM »

Not quite clear to me what you mean shane, could you do a quick sketch?

I am new to airbrushing!

Ian
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Bunkerbarge

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2007, 05:09:14 PM »

Techniques such as you are describing above only need to be considered if you are not able to turn down the airbrush to the size of pattern you require.

Depending on your airbrush the best way is to use it to generate the degree of shading you want by adjusting the spray pattern.  You can feather the edge to be just as graduated or as hard as you want then.

The basic philosophy of using the darker colour over the lighter colour is still the best though.
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slewis

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2007, 09:25:30 PM »

Bunkerbarge You are correct in what you are saying

The technique I am describing is what a lot of people do to create a soft edge when they spray paint camoflage colours on model aircraft . A lot of people dont have access to an airbrush so this method is used instead .

I agree that with a good airbrush the same effect can be achieved without all the masking materials described above.

Ian  Its a bit late now but tomorrow I will take a couple of pics or do a sketch to show what I am trying to describe in more detail .

Shane
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slewis

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2007, 06:09:04 PM »

Here you go Ian


The sketch itself is fairly self explanatory with the soft edge being created by overspray underneath the round foam masking .

Shane
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boatmadman

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2007, 06:12:31 PM »

Great, Thanks Shane.

Been playing with the airbrush today, made a mess! I was too impatient I think, put on too much paint too quickly, it ran!

Think I need to do lots of light coats with time to dry off in between?

Sanding down next!

Ian
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Voyager

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2007, 07:53:01 PM »

Thining the the paint down the the correct mix is the key, more so if your blending in two colours with a faded line, or using masking tape for a hard line. I tend to lightly thicken my paint mix if i have masked a model up, with it being slightly thicker it's less likely to bleen under the masking tape. Rubbing down with fine wet & dry between coats improves the final look of the model.
When your mixing for airbrushing, your looking for a fine spray pattern, too thick and the granuals are big and heavy, too thin and it will appear too transparent and will run easily.

Hope this helps you!

Voyager
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boatmadman

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2007, 07:53:53 PM »

Thanks, all tips help!

ian
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slewis

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2007, 08:20:19 PM »

regarding the bleeding under masking tape .
Heres a tip for you .
dust a light coat of the original colour over the edge of the tape first and allow it to dry off, this way if any bleeding occours its the same colour as the original and it seals the tape preventing further bleeding
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Voyager

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2007, 09:23:46 PM »

Good tip Shane!!!
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tigertiger

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #13 on: May 28, 2007, 03:12:17 AM »

I have a question on masking.

Some say remove masking tape before paint dries to it does not peel.
This would mean masking for every coat.

Others say wait till paint is finihed and dried.

What do you recomend and why?

Sig
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Bunkerbarge

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #14 on: May 28, 2007, 11:26:51 AM »

I think the general idea is that if you wait for the paint to completely harden there is a danger of it 'splintering' along the edge as you remove the tape.  If the paint is still a bit softer it will not do this.

I also think it is to help reduce the seepage under the tape due to capilliary action so removing it as soon as possible is best.  I wouldn't however remask between coats but I would make sure that I don't put so much on that you leave a significant edge to the paint when the tape is removed. 

Any such edge should be carefully rubbed down with a rubbing compound before a couple of coats of clear varnish to level and seal it all.
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Voyager

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2007, 02:26:46 PM »

Yes, i agree with bunkerbarge! I remove my tape a short time after spraying it, i like to check to make sure that it's come out ok, if i should find any slight over spray, i use a cotton bud and thinners to wipe away the offending area. If you leave the paint to dry fully, then you have to go to the trouble of remasking and spraying it all again.
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tigertiger

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2007, 02:33:23 PM »

At the risk of sounding dumb.

How long is a short time?

Is this after all coats? As I have a book (Finishing Model Ships - Gorman) that suggests 24hrs between coats of acrylic.

Hence confusion.
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Voyager

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #17 on: May 28, 2007, 02:57:16 PM »

Around 20min-30min for Enamel paints (note: some Enamel based paints are faster drying than others, i can recommend Rail Match or Humbrol). Acrylics on the other hand are known for fast drying, if your are using Tamiya acrylics, then you can wipe away any over spray (whilst it's still drying/aprox 20min-30min) with Tamiya dedicated thinners with a cotton bud.
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Voyager

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2007, 04:54:32 PM »

Just found a great quick drying thinners for airbrushing ;D Phoenix paints do a range of thinners for airbrushing, of which i have been using for sometime with good results. For the past couple of weeks i've been using the new quick drying thinners, can't believe the improvements from just using different thinners from their range.

Improvements are:

Increase in working time through the airbrush!

Paint droplets are super fine!

Quicker drying!


I've used this thinner with Humbrol too, works exactly the same with brilliant results O0
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kiteman1

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Re: airbrush technique
« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2007, 07:08:02 PM »

It might be a good idea for someone to clarify the different grades of thinners used.  I believe that the trade use, or did, a cheap water washable one as well as the better quality.  I might be talking out of the back of my head but will be spraying soon and some clear guidance is necessary.  I've also sprayed over Acrylics with enamel thinnners and had to do a repaint in the past.

What or whose thinners should I use for Humbrol matt paints and are the thinners from my motor factor paint supplier the same as that used by model shops?  Is superstore satin varnish still ok for protection spray-over after completion?

I have found a good low-tack plastic tape at the local factors which is around 1 a roll.

Any info would be very helpful............ :-\ :-\
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