Model Boat Mayhem

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length.
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down

Author Topic: Billing Banckert Build  (Read 11690 times)

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Billing Banckert Build
« on: March 30, 2013, 08:02:34 AM »

In May last year I was fortunate enough to get a work-sponsored trip to the UK and US.
Taking advantage of the opportunity I tried desperately to buy a Dumas Akula kit and have it shipped to the Hotel I was staying at in Boston on the last leg of the trip. Unfortunately this didn't work out as my credit card billing address wasn't in the US.
Fortunately I found this out before I left the UK and in particular while I was in Manchester.


Finding myself with a morning free I took a bit of a wander and visited the art gallery, admired the architecture and found my way to the Manchester ModelZone.


Needless to say they didn't have many submarines that were suitably sized, but they did have a number of larger kits of ships in stock. After admiring, very briefly due to the price, the Fairmount Alpine, I spotted the Banckert with an on-sale price tag of 100 quid. "Blimey" sez I, with two 50 quid notes in my pocket, "that's cheap...". Let me put this in perspective for you - 100 pounds = roughly $200NZ and you cant get close to a Banckert kit in NZ for that sort of money. And I've just checked, local pricing for the Banckert starts around the $400NZ mark - so I figure I got it half price.


All that I then needed to do was get it back to NZ. So I took the bits out of the box, wrapped it all up in a large jacket, stuffed it in my suitcase and discarded the box. I bet the hotel staff were a bit bemused when they cleared the box away...


I duly arrived home and regaled SWMBO with stories of all the money I had saved etc, etc, and duly put the kit to one side as there were other things I was working on.


Well, as it does, procrastination kicked in on the other projects and I pulled the Banckert out for a look-see. Taking something out and looking at it is, as most will realise, a bad step as it means you probably are going to do more than look - even if you didn't mean it...


So anyway, here's what would have been in the box, had I kept it...

Plans and instructions and stuff.



Hull, deck, wood and fittings etc.



And the wooden parts were even laser cut!
But note - there were no part numbers printed on them, and there was no master diagram anywhere showing what bits were on what sheet of ply. Yes there was a list that says part # 80 is on sheet 89L, but nothing to say where on 89L... Which, believe me, is a problem (for me anyway), as so many of the parts are very similar in dimensions.

Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2013, 08:14:40 AM »

So the first thing to do is remove the hull and deck from the moulded ABS frame it comes in, looking something like this before being separated:





And afterwards looking something like this:



and



Bear in mind that this was all done last year and I've been saving the photos up so that it looks like I'm really efficient and a quick builder... But this was all done in July last year.


The next steps involved getting the basic frame into the hull, which looks like this. These pieces are of course relatively easy to find due to their size...









The frames are just sitting in the hull as this stage, so I can make sure that everything fits like it should.
It was about this stage that I realised that I needed a stand, so I set about making one.






In this last photo, the foam is being glued to the wooden frame of the stand. The stand itself is 18mm pine and a broom handle from the local hardware store. Not a pretty item and certainly not a display stand, but intended to protect the model during transport.
Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2013, 08:28:10 AM »

With a solid stand to work on, I could then start gluing the frames into the hull.





Now, for one reason or another, but probably because I wasn't describing the build here as I was doing it, I don't have as many photos as I thought I did - so please fill in the blanks as needed - but the next step seems to have included getting the stuffing tube in place and locating the kort nozzle...








I do know that this took a while with much checking and aligning and so on. In particular, one of the interesting jobs was locating correctly the supporting brass bar from the nozzle to the hull and getting that right. Additonally, the plans showed that the bar was anchored to the hull by two brass pins. Of course these were not numbered at all in the list of parts as I recall, but they were supplied - as were another two pins of a slightly different size - so, which ones to use, and where were the other pair to be used? Given that none of the supplied pins corresponded to the length of pin in the plan, I just picked a pair and got on with it. I also used Araldite to assist with holding the bar to the hull and nozzle.


If anyone is curious this took place in August 2012.
Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2013, 09:10:30 AM »

Work then proceeded with the framing on the deck -this is quite a flimsy piece, so does need the framing and possibly even more as none goes to the bow area, so this can twist somewhat as well.





Clamping while the Araldite dries:





Unfortunately you will need to fill in the blanks again, but suffice it to say that clamping was interesting due to the high sided shape of the deck section.


Next step was assembly of the rudders. Supplied in laser cut form are 4 pieces of wood, meaning two for each rudder as well as the associated brass shafts, tubes and rudder arms. I chose not to use the rudder arms, but they are shown in this photo:



As you can see from this photo, I filed out a groove for the rudder shaft big enough to allow the rudder pieces to be in full contact with each other for gluing. Again Araldite was used to join all these pieces together. What I did instead of using the supplied brass arms, which, quite frankly, were a bit useless for the task, was to make my own fittings that were better suited to the job as I saw it:





And:





The connecting rod between the rudders is just two lengths of .7mm brass wire soldered together - this was brass railing left over from my Zwarte Zee build a couple of years earlier - and bent to fit.


What is not shown in the photos is the mucking about required to get the rudder shafts in the right place, vertical in two axis and generally looking right. The first attempt had the shafts vertical looking down the length of the hull, but not vertical when looking from the side. So I ended up with two sets of locating hole in the plastic assembly of the kort nozzle where the bottom end of the shaft fits. The unused set got filled with Tamiya modellers putty which is my preferred material for this sort of thing.


As another thought, the thing about these rudder is that once in place they cant be removed - there isn't enough wiggle in all the pieces that the rudders can be put in place after the supporting blocks are glued into the hull - unless one were to have large gaps between the rudder tubes and the support blocks inside the hull that would then require filling to make them secure. I could have chose to glue the rudder blades(?) to the shaft later, but the thought of all the Araldite running away didn't excite me all that much. The steps I took when something like:
 - glue rudders together onto shafts
 - drill some small holes int he right place in hull A certain amount of guess work involved here - drill once after checking 9 times...
 - check the location of the holes
 - when happy make the holes wide enough for the rudder tubes
 - Drill holes in supporting arms on the Kort for the end of the rudder shaft
 - check these visually with the rudders in place
 - redrill as it wasn't right
 - check again and fill the unneeded holes.
 - When convinced everything is ok, put the rudders and shaft assembly in the right place, and slide the rudder tube over the  shaft and glue in place with a small amount of epoxy.
 - Shape the supporting blocks for the tubes, slide over the tubes and glue in place.
 - hope like hell you got it right and live with rudders flopping about for the rest of the build.


You can also see in these photos, particularly the 2nd photo, that I added a supporting piece of ply where the kort nozzle is anchored by a nut a bolt (supplied - I provided the oversize washer) into the hull. This is not in the plan, but I didn't fancy the kort being fixed to merely the ABS hull.


Now we are in October, BTW...
Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2013, 08:03:26 PM »

Next steps are to start working on the superstructure and the deck fittings.


This is the main access hatch into the hull.
One piece of flat ply and 4 ply frames. The two longer pieces of ply come precurved.





The hatch fits better with it's edges bevelled.








But the curve isn't quite right - I wonder if the support frames under the deck have taken some of the curve out of it...


Then comes this thing - I presume that it is some sort of engineers locker as well as allowing lighting to the engineering spaces under the deck.


This was interesting to build...





because...





Nothing quite fitted...





So I made my own parts in place of those that were supplied, to make sure that they fitted. Here's an example - original on top, new underneath:





Eventually leading to this...





Then there were other pieces to assemble:








And by the time you add all these bit together and put some paint on, it looks like this:




Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2013, 08:26:14 PM »

There's a hatch to cover the rudder workings which is fairly simple being just a matter of gluing some small, think pieces of ply onto a bigger thicker piece.





Again, no construction shots, but not really needed for this. However, it appears that this just sits in place, and that did not appeal to me - it needed something to help hold it in. So I traced around the underside of the hatch against the edges of the hole inthe deck and glued some spare pieces of wood in place. These butt up against the ABD deck and provide a relatively secure fit:





Onto the main superstructure, where I made a couple of mistakes I think. The first is illustrated below:





Now you may be wondering what the mistake is - so I shall tell you - nothing is keeping this square...


Once again we have lack of photos - sorry about that, but this goes together relatively simply - the only real complications being the curved upper deck and bending the play around the two front edges of this part. I also note that although it doesn't appear in the instructions there is a capping that is supposed to go over the lower front part of the structure  to act I presume as a railing - this is, if one looks carefully on the plans. I have left it off...

Ooo! Wait! Stop Press!! Missing Photos found!

















So where does the missing capping (or rail I suppose) go?


Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2013, 08:32:24 PM »

More of the superstructure assembly:





Here I made use of a part that is supposed to sit at deck level to help locate the wheelhouse as  curved support section at the top to help keep the shape while gluing.









Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2013, 08:41:21 PM »

At this point I had a little bit of fun, because, well, stuff didn't fit too well.





So eventually I put this top deck back into it's original sheet and marked it out and cut it slightly larger:





Stepping back a little was the funnel/mast:





where there was another problem. The supplied 1/2 round was not of very good quality at all, with the profile around the curve not being consistent, missing an edge where the wood had split etc. So I made a new one out of some suitably sized dowel I already had.





leading to this:





Anyhoo, the main SS looks like this:





And I decided to add some hinges to doors:





Nearly there:





but still some work to do...


Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2013, 09:12:39 PM »

One of the features of this tug is the fittings kit, which consists of a fairly large number of brass parts (in sealed bags as I recall). One of the things they make up is a anchor winch. Interestingly plastic anchors are supplied as well although there is no mention in the instructions about putting Hawse Pipes into the hull. I resolved to do this.


By continuous referral to the plan (2 dimensional plan to 3d model is always fun...) I picked an appropriate spot and made a mark. Then drilled a hole...





Which got made bigger...





In my mind I had plan whereby I would be able to have the deck separate from the hull as needed - something that seemed desirable as the access holes are not large and I wanted to experiment with brushless motors in a tug. One of the things that would be required was Hawse pipes that would allow this to happen. I quickly became apparent that to do this I would need to remove the anchors or anchor chains or, else the deck could only removed the length of the slack in the chains which wouldn't be very far... After much gnashing of teeth and procrastination, I decided that the Hawse pipes didn't need to go all the way from the hull up to the deck and that they could be cut short in both location. The only drawback being that one would not be able to see the light when looking down the hawse pipes...


So they ended up like this on the hull:





And like this on the deck:





Note the clever use of balsa to support the pipes... And that they have been crimped closed - to stop water getting into the hull and so I can glue the chain into them. I have just remembered that at this point I have no chain lockers, so need to get that sorted before I paint the deck...
Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2013, 09:26:16 PM »

And what I left off the last post was how it all fits together in hull.


What I did was trim the anchor fittings a little, drilled a hole for some wire to go through that would hold the anchors in place.
Additionally I had to modify the anchor fitting by allowing the long arm of the anchor to move at a greater angle to the base so it would sit properly against the hull. I did this by carving a little out of the side that went against the hull.








The anchor and wire were then passed up the tube and the wire bent over the end of the tube. Next and quickly, a little hot melt glue was squeezed into the tube and the end of the tube crimped with pliers:





and





Once the hawse pipes were complete I was able to paint the hull. The usual preparations applied - rub down, fill as required, rub down. I used a plastic adhesion primer as the base coat, followed by the colour coats, which are automotive lacquers in cans (from Super Cheap Auto's colour match range if any Kiwi's or Aussies are interested) which I have used in the past with success.











Due to the ridge line between the red and black colours, the hull received a rub down with 800 wet and dry, used wet, before a clear coat was sprayed on. The end is result is a good, if a little bit orange peelish, paint job that is satisfactory to my eye.
Logged
Alister

tugnut

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 403
  • Location: herne bay kent
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #10 on: March 31, 2013, 07:53:12 AM »

Thats a neet build , looking good :-)) .
 
John B
Logged

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #11 on: March 31, 2013, 09:01:21 AM »

Thanks John :)
Logged
Alister

thething84

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 188
  • Model Boat Mayhem is Great!
  • Location: Newmarket, Suffolk
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2013, 09:39:19 AM »

looks good. i also have this but only half built. i need to build superstructure from scratch as purchased part built kit. i wasnt happy with the quality of the original build
Logged
If it ain't broke! Fix it anyway!

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2013, 09:04:58 AM »

I think I got a little out of sequence there, not that it really matters.
But we are almost up to real time events.


2 things have not gone well for me on this build. First was the wooden capping that simulates the flat surface on the top of the bulwarks - quite frankly I made a mess of gluing it on and should have removed it, but resorted to sanding it back to be flush with the sides on the bulwarks before I thought the matter through. This means that the width of the capping varies somewhat, and I did not tidy up the epoxy I used properly which has made painting the inside of the bulwarks a trial as it looks crap to be honest. LOL! I've been auto-edited! "Rubbish" was not the word I used :)
The second major has been the painting of the upper levels of the superstructure, in particular these bits:



Let me explain why: Late last year, for some unknown and improbable reason, the committee at my club decided to invite me, along with another person, to be the judges at our annual static modelling competition. This was very interesting and I quite enjoyed it - but, gee whiz, does it make you very critical of your own work - particularly given what we were compelled to say about some of the models we judged. In particular when one scrutinises a model closely any paint imperfections stand out and, well, I don't think I do paint well anyway, but I certainly felt that my game needed to be lifted...


Anyway, I decided that what I wanted to do was the paint as many of the items as I could before they were glued together, thuis avoiding the dreaded wavey line of paint. For some parts this worked well and for others, particularly given how they needed to be joined together and the filling and so on required, made this impossible to do - for me anyway. The reason for doing this was to ensure that the best possible paint finish could be achieved. So this was going quite well (unless you count the number of empty cans of paint I have collected) until I came to the aforementioned parts. As you can see from this photo





there is a lot of masking going on. And a lot of different angles that need to be attacked to ensure coverage. At the end of the day I ended up with runs in the paint and areas where the paint was visibly thick. And despite my best efforts to rectify this, I have not been able to fully resolve the problem.
Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2013, 09:44:47 AM »

Having decided fairly early on that I was going to try a brushless motor in my Banckert, one day when SWMBO was otherwise occupied I order three motors, one each at 750, 930 and 1100kv, from one Chinese outfit, with the intention that either the 750 or 930kv motors would be appropriate for the model. I then got some marine brushless ESC's from HobbyKing, along with a programming card for the ESC's and two 2 cell 5Ah LiPo batteries.  I also sourced some of the ubiquitous Huco couplings from a UK supplier and proceeded to set up motor mounts, get alignment done and so on. This was all done last year some time - Octoberish I think.


Anyway, the time came, a few days ago, when the hull was completed as much as I cared to make it and all the bits needed to be put in place.


First up I needed to put the battery somewhere I could get at it easily, so after a bit of thought I built a battery box for it:





Quite happy with that, but did need to take a little of the ABS out of the deck to ensure it would go in and come out easily.
Then I started adding the other bits - rudder servo and motor etc:





Now you may notice that I do not have a Huco coupling in place here, but something a little more universal in design. What's interesting is that a month or two back I decided to play with the brushless motors I had bought in another model. I made up some temporary mounts and, using the Huco coupling, tried both the 750 and 1100kv motors in my old Moonglow (http://www.myhobbystore.co.uk/product/16680/moonglow-mm800 if anyone is interested). Both worked very well, with the 1100kv motor at 11.1 volts (3s LiPo pack) getting the Moonglow up on the plane in most convincing fashion - it also got so hot that the motor was smoking and I burnt my fingers enough I had to dunk them in the pond for a few moments - but it all work, the ESC stayed cool and, as I recall the Huco was good.
Anyway, back to the Banckert: having squeezed some light grease into the stuffing tube and worked the shaft in and attaching the motor and propellor and I decided to give it a try. Well it worked, but it was noisy and there was quite a definite knocking sound... Anyway much mucking about later I ditched the Huco and salvaged the coupling you can see in the photo from a combination of parts drawer and, umm, I'm sorry to say my sons boat (don't worry it wasn't working as he managed to strip the blades from the plastic prop and I haven't replaced it yet! Mental note - replace prop on sons boat ASAP...). And we now have a much quieter and knock free boat. I'm sure some will say "I told you so!", to which I will say "yes you did, but I had to try it myself", but there we go.


The servo you can see is not a standard size, but something a bit smaller as there wasn't a huge amount of room. For those interested, it's this one: http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=13421 and they seem to work quite nicely, if a little noisy under load.
The ESC is one of these: http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=24567 and once the "brake" function is removed, it also seems to work quite nicely. I have it fused at 10A in the Banckert.


The reason I haven't mentioned where I got the motors from is that I have recently had a little trouble in that having ordered some more motors from them, one of three was supplied incorrectly and I have not yet, after repeated attempts, heard anything back, which is a little disappointing. However anyone searching for 2830/14 will find many retailers of that type.
Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2013, 08:51:15 AM »

A couple of small items that I have done previously were some of the storage/tool boxes that go around the ship. Simple stuff you would think - and in the case of two of them (the matched pair) this was the case, but the third box in the photo took a little while to decipher how it went together as it is in fact a parallelogram when viewed from the side elevation. Eventually we got there, but it was a bit of a jigsaw puzzle, particularly without the part numbers on the actual part...
On the pair of boxes I decided to replace the lid as the supplied 2mm ply part was, to my eye, way to big and chunky. As I had some .040 styrene left over from another build I chose to use that:





Quite happy with those now.


Recent steps have been to do with the railings and other fittings around the boat:





These two came together quite well, but I have just discovered that I need to make two more of the lights. Interestingly and somewhat confusingly, the ships bell is depicted differently in different views on the plan and the instructions - all to do with the shape of the curve in the top of the stand that the bell hangs off. I chose a simple option achieved by wrapping the brass wire around the handle of a jewellers file.


Railings are fun aren't they - I don't mind soldering them together and it's great when the solder flow into the stantion, but tidying up all that solder is a real PITA...








What I decided to do with these, the corner stantions was put a hole through at right angles to the pre-drilled hole in the stantion. This was quite a fiddle and the result was not entirely wonderful, but after paint I think a magnifying glass would be required to spot the flaws.








The way I went about the railings was to use baking paper as a template to locate the pre-drilled (lasered in fact) holes and transfer them to a bit of scrap pine board I had. I then drilled holes in the pine board and got on with putting things into place.


I used a similar method for the stantions on top of the wheelhouse and the little cabin below and aft of the wheelhouse except that the holes were not prepositioned. I measured and marked these on the wheelhouse and cabin, then drilled them with a pin vice and then used the baking paper to transfer to the pin board.








The laborious task of cleaning up the solder was done and then the parts sprayed with etch primer before the top coats.

Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2013, 06:00:35 AM »

We must be up to real time now as these are photos of progress over the last couple of days. I was fortunate to be able to take the remaining days of the week as leave after Easter, so have been able to get some stuff done.


Next on the longish list of things to do was fittings.


One of the more useful things that could have been included in this kitset that was not (but was in the Zwarte Zee) is a page of images of what all the little metal parts are. I've been able to figure it out, but it's been a bit hit an miss I think. However, here are the majority of fittings that have been assembled, etch primed and now have a single coat of paint on them:





The only reason I know (or think I do) what parts make up the anchor winch is because it's the bits left over from all the other fittings... I've done a trial assembly on that - then put the bits in a bag and but them out of the way for now.


Other things to do was to bend the nice bits of 3mm o/d brass rod for the metal frames on the work deck. I suspect these have a name, but I'm not sure what it is... The requirement is to bend the three bits of rod to make hoops that go over the various bits and pieces. There is no template supplied for this, so it's kind of best guess for me. Anyway the first step was to start bending and adjusting the angle of the bend - well that work until





it broke in a bend. Bother. I pondered that for a bit, wondering if it was going to be possible for me to get all of the bends right this first time or if I needed to do something else.
The something else involved this bit of gear I have poached from my father:





And with this I set about annealing the brass rod to make it softer.


Here they are cooling:





This made a significant difference and I was able to bend the rod much easier, adjust the angles and so on until it was right:





Here is the aft-most fitting with it's wooden attachments:





and in place from above:





And all together:





The fore-most and aft-most have vertical rods that hold and support the bar. I tried soldering these in place, but it wasn't working well and as I was using soft solder (not silver solder) it wasn't very strong. I resorted to filing a flat on the underside of each bar in the appropriate place for the vertical rod to go, drilling a hole of the correct diameter and locating the rod into the hole before soldering it in place. I did use the gas bottle to do this due to the thickness of the bars.


Finally, as always there was more painting to do...





And that's up to date.
Logged
Alister

mark w

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 270
  • "I stick my neck out for nobody"
  • Location: Whittier, CA.
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #17 on: April 12, 2013, 12:35:48 AM »

That's what you get for opening the box  :} . Lookin' great.
 
Mark
Logged
"If she can stand it, I can too, play it"

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #18 on: April 13, 2013, 11:49:56 PM »

Thanks for your comments Mark :)


Less progress this week due to having to go to work. Also my son's football season has started so that's reduced available hours on Saturday's too.


Anyway, I added some more paint to the upper level superstructure and mast:





And I also managed to etch prime and then top-coat the "Tow Rope Support Bars" - such as I believe them to be called:





And finally for the weekend (even though it's not even midday on Sunday here -other things to do this afternoon), I masked up and added some colour to the main deck:





That highlighted a couple of finishing problems that I thought had been attended to around the hawse pipes - these will need revisiting before more painting is done.
Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #19 on: April 17, 2013, 09:13:20 AM »

So back in reply #14, down the bottom I blathered on a bit about a supplier of brushless motors who had supplied the wrong items and I was unable to get hold of them to see what could be done to redress the situation.


Well, it turns out that when you get the right contact information you get a very prompt and professional reply and the end result was that I got the correct motor shipped to me at no cost and was offered the motor I had received by mistake at a substantial discount - or I could send it back at their cost. I chose the former, as I thought it easier all around.


So for those wondering what motor I'm using, it is, very specifically this one:
<url>http://rctimer.com/index.php?gOo=goods_details.dwt&goodsid=123&productname=</url>


from, as the URL suggests, RCTimer.com. Whom I now unhesitatingly recommend.
Logged
Alister

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #20 on: April 21, 2013, 01:08:32 AM »

Work this weekend has been on the deck and working towards completing that.


More paint has been involved and this is the 3rd coat completed and I have removed the masking tape:





This has been done by hand painting with Tamiya acrylics if anyone is interested. I chose hand painting because I wasn't sure of the getting a good result by airbrushing it on - the airbrush option just needs me to sit down, waste some paint and get it sorted out. I just wasn't willing to do that right in the middle of the build. What I have found with the Tamiya paints is that the brushe needs to be kept fairly wet. With Humbrol paints, in particular the enamels they can, and probably should, be fairly well brushed out. But with the Tamiya acrylics that doesn't seem to work very well and can result in pulling the paint already laid down away causing not only unpainted areas, but lumps and bumps as well.


Once the paint had gone touch dry I was able to do a few more things.
Fitting this in with a touch of superglue:





And getting these bollard support brackets in place:





Both items will need a bit a filler applied and so on before painting the railing again.


I also worked on the rungs to get up to the flying bridge. Just the 1mm brass rod bent to shape:





These are awaiting painting before being put in place.
Logged
Alister

derekwarner

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8,195
  • Location: Wollongong Australia
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #21 on: April 21, 2013, 02:10:09 AM »

Alister.........
I do prefer the style or texture of the hull/deck coaming surface finish you have shown here....tug boats are working vessels & steel hulls are steel hulls  %)
Viewing a model of a steel hulled [work boat] that has the surface finish appearance of polished glass  >>:-( can sometimes take away reality...I am sure you understand what I mean
Carry on the good work.........Derek

 
Logged
Derek Warner

Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op
Australia
www.ils.org.au

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #22 on: April 24, 2013, 10:02:51 PM »

Hi Derek,


I understand entirely what you mean - it's just that I have achieved the effect you describe totally by accident!



Logged
Alister

thething84

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 188
  • Model Boat Mayhem is Great!
  • Location: Newmarket, Suffolk
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #23 on: May 01, 2013, 11:38:34 PM »

Hey Alistar.
 
Hows it coming. My banckert is going really really slowly. Kep having to rearrange things. Got my motors mounted to find the battery i intended on using doesn't fit. So having to redesign. Think i not going for two 6v NiMh Sub C's. Also i was thinking about planking the deck. I found a static model on the Net someone had done and it had a planked deck. Looked quite nice.
 
James
Logged
If it ain't broke! Fix it anyway!

AlisterL

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: Billing Banckert Build
« Reply #24 on: May 05, 2013, 09:47:34 AM »

Hi James,


I have a couple of photos of work taken last weekend, but nothing major and nothing done this weekend at all as I've just had the last 4 days in Sydney with the family for a friends 40th birthday. We arrived home about 2 1/2 hours ago - and I'm on Mayhem already :)


I think that there is plenty of scope for personalising this kit - so many things could be changed as you feel the need, so go ahead and plank it! From my initial test it looks like I'm going to need around 2kg's of ballast, so as long as any weight you add is not up too high, you should be fine. And yes, interior access is somewhat limited and does affect battery choice somewhat.


At the moment I'm procrastinating about the copper tubing that is for the fire stations (is that the right term?)  and whether or not I should anneal those before I try and bend them...
Logged
Alister
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up