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Author Topic: Name of ship part  (Read 5169 times)

NFMike

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Name of ship part
« on: April 18, 2013, 05:47:22 pm »


Now I'm familiar with most common parts such as hull, deck, deckhead, bow, stern, superstructure and a lot of less common terms too, so I feel I should know this one, but can't find it anywhere.


Dividing walls within a ship's hull are called bulkheads and the outer wall is the hull of course. Within the superstructure it seems the walls could be bulkheads or partitions - the sources I've read don't agree - but I cannot find anything 'official' to call an outside wall of the superstructure. 'Side' seems possible but doesn't sound right for forward or rear facing parts somehow.


Anyone?

Netleyned

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2013, 06:30:42 pm »

Most of us who have spent more than a Dogwatch at sea
would probably stick with bulkhead as a generic term
for a wall in a ship. But in a Yorkie Barge the inside panelling
Of the hull was the ceiling
Amending Yorkie Barge to Humber Keel before Spider T
pushes me into the Bur com Sand


Ned
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Mickeyfinns

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2013, 08:41:53 pm »

Time I spent years ago, in the merchant they were always known as bulk heads, Stern bulkhead, forward bulkhead but still bulkhead. O0 :-)) 8) 8) 8)
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Colin Bishop

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2013, 09:00:02 pm »

Deckhouse?
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ardarossan

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2013, 09:14:20 pm »

Bridge?
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Mickeyfinns

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2013, 09:17:18 pm »

Deckhouse and bridge still made up of bulkheads. 8) 8) 8)
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ardarossan

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2013, 09:26:06 pm »

Deckhouse and bridge still made up of bulkheads. 8) 8) 8)

A sweepimg statement that isn't actually - You couldn't describe as GRP moulding (for example) as being constructed from several 'bulkheads'
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vnkiwi

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2013, 10:15:09 pm »

"Deckhouse and bridge still made up of bulkheads. 8) 8) 8) " Oh yes, on ships they are, irrespective of material used. cheers vnkiwi 
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derekwarner

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #8 on: April 19, 2013, 01:48:35 am »

mmmmmm Mr Google seems to again know just about everything.........Derek  :o
 
"BULKHEAD   - A term applied to any one of the partition walls which subdivide the interior of a ship into compartments or rooms. The various types of bulkheads are distinguished by the addition of a word or words, explaining the location, use, kind of material or method of fabrication"
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Bryan Young

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2013, 05:43:26 pm »

Dear all.
The above answers are, like the Curates egg, good in parts, not so in other bits.
Staying with steel ships….
Bulkheads are indeed dividing “walls”. And these “walls” go upwards from one steel deck to another. This is part of the ships structure.
A “Partition” bulkhead is a non-structural” affair. These are bulkheads that can be easily knocked down to make a compartment either bigger or smaller. Thus enabling the internal layout of a ship to be changed with relative ease.
The same applies to houses.
Obviously the partition bulkhead starts at deck level, but doesn’t always need to go all the way up to the steel deckhead. Many ships have a false deckhead leaving a gap between the “false” and the true steel deckhead. This space will be used to run piping, cables etc. through instead of having (say) a cabin with all sorts of stuff running through it and visible to the eye.
The partition bulkheads can also be a fire hazard ….which is why I never liked them very much. Although I did like an unencumbered deckhead.
The word “ceiling” on a ship is just the opposite of that found in a building. That is, you walk on it. But the term is really only used for the wooden cladding at the bottom of a cargo hold. The term “spar ceiling” refers to the wooden boards that line the sides of a cargo hold, so preventing a vulnerable cargo getting wet or dried out if it was loaded against the steel sides of the vessel.
Another “odd-ball” is the term “Floors”. On a ship a floor is vertical. Mainly found as either a solid, fabricated or perforated mini bulkhead in double bottoms.Confused yet? Ship terminology goes back into times far past, but they are still terms used today. BY.
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NFMike

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2013, 06:32:47 pm »

"BULKHEAD   - A term applied to any one of the partition walls which subdivide the interior of a ship into compartments or rooms. The various types of bulkheads are distinguished by the addition of a word or words, explaining the location, use, kind of material or method of fabrication"
Yes, this is one of a number of similar items I found, all of which refer to interior division, not the outside 'walls', and at least one seemed to be saying that bulkheads were within the hull only.


That's an interesting post Bryan (immediately above). I didn't know about the use of ceiling and floor in nautical terminology. But (sorry) it doesn't answer my question.
I think we can allow bulkhead to cover the interior partitioning throughout the ship, but can it cover the outside skin of the superstructure?
Taking a bridge or wheelhouse - there is an outside wall with windows in the top part ... calling that a bulkhead just doesn't sound right to me.

Netleyned

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2013, 06:35:10 pm »

Bridge Screen is a term that comes to mind.

Ned
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Bryan Young

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2013, 06:47:39 pm »

Partition bulkheads are, to my knowledge, only used as "partitions" internally between the steel structural bulkheads. Sorry, I thought I'd made that quite clear. BY.
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YJRR2

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2013, 09:01:14 pm »

Time I spent years ago, in the merchant they were always known as bulk heads, Stern bulkhead, forward bulkhead but still bulkhead. O0 :-)) 8) 8) 8)


Mikeyfinns is right; they're all bulkheads - further defined using terms such as aft, forward, partition, longitudinal,transverse and, in the case of the original question 'External'!


Jimi
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ardarossan

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2013, 03:14:27 am »

Yes, this is one of a number of similar items I found, all of which refer to interior division, not the outside 'walls', and at least one seemed to be saying that bulkheads were within the hull only.

That's an interesting post Bryan (immediately above). I didn't know about the use of ceiling and floor in nautical terminology. But (sorry) it doesn't answer my question.
I think we can allow bulkhead to cover the interior partitioning throughout the ship, but can it cover the outside skin of the superstructure?
Taking a bridge or wheelhouse - there is an outside wall with windows in the top part ... calling that a bulkhead just doesn't sound right to me.

I've got to agree with your feelings about the subject, but to be fair, it is also hard to ignore three independant users who have provided apparently definitive replies to the initial post.
Therefore, if Mickeyfinns, vnkiwi and YJRR2 would be kind enough to supply the source or reference data to support their statements, I'm sure that I won't be the only one who would be extremely appreciative of their efforts.

Andy
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vnkiwi

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2013, 06:05:06 am »

I'm sure if you where genuinely interested, you would 'google' it, and find dozens of definitions for 'bulkhead' and its origin.
Here's one;

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulkhead_'partition'The word bulki meant "cargo" in Old Norse. Sometime in the 15th century sailors and builders in Europe realized that walls within a vessel would prevent cargo from shifting during passage. In shipbuilding, any vertical panel was called a "head". So walls installed abeam (side-to-side) in a vessel's hull were called "bulkheads." Now, the term bulkhead applies to every vertical panel aboard a ship, except for the hull itself.

Worked for me.

There are many other references.
My usage? 4 generations before myself of seafarers(civil & naval) / builders, engineers and designers, me, outside my day job, I just mess about in small boats and design, draw & build model boats & ships.
cheers
vnkiwi  %)
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YJRR2

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2013, 08:19:11 am »

Hey, chill people...this is supposed to be a friendly forum with and exchange of info!!


I've been at sea for 20 years and never referred to it as anything else...it's not been a problem for me!


However if this helps, it's a reference document from a Classification Society.....all ships are registered under these and surveyed regularly from keel laid to run up on some beach and recycled!
http://www.veristar.com/content/static/veristarinfo/images/4930.29.577NI_2012-07.pdf


Scroll down to 1.2.7 for a reference to 'External Bulkheads'. Then go have a cuppa and relax!!


Jimi
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Mickeyfinns

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #17 on: April 20, 2013, 09:25:08 am »

 :-)) :-)) :-))  Tea in hand YJRR2  :-)) :-)) :-)) enough said.  8) 8) 8)
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Jerry C

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #18 on: April 20, 2013, 11:27:36 am »

This is actually quite an intriguing subject and as such not as straight forward as it seems. I see where vnkiwi is coming from. I realised that I didn't really know the answer so looked it up in my own old and trusted reference books, "The Boatswain's Manual" and "Know Your own Ship" by Dalton. These both suggest that "bulkheads" refers to internal vertical surfaces in the ship and not to the ships side. Indeed, personally, I would, if inside a hold, refer to the port and starboard limits of the space as the ships side or the side plating. I would understand the meaning of another person referring to these terms and expect him to understand me. Similarly if outside, say on the dock, I would call it the ship's side. Other well used (not necessarily correct) terms used came to mind, eg. "The bridge front". It's what I'm used to but when I think about it, it doesn't have that nautical ring to it. Then, while searching further I came across the instructions for what to ring on the bell when on lookout duty. The book said, "one stroke for a ship to starboard, two strokes for a ship to port and three strokes for a ship right ahead, or the other way round, according to the ships rules!". Rules do change between ships and shipping companys. I remember joining a Safmarine ship and turning up in charge of the wrong boat at lifeboat drill because that company referred to the forward port boat as number one. Another thing to be aware of is that seamen and naval architects is different animals. As seamen, we take pride in walking on the ceiling an having vertical "floors". I quite often refer to the walls of my house as bulkheads and often Hoover the deck. It's all part of being a silly old fart. Finally I do find it strange that people can get heated up about all this. If the other guy knows what you mean surely it's ok. Try communicating with Russian, Dutch, Indonesian Filipino and Ethiopian all at once!
Jerry.

Bryan Young

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #19 on: April 20, 2013, 05:26:11 pm »

Bridge Screen is a term that comes to mind.

Ned
The bridge screen is simply a railing that's been plated over....therefore it's a form of bulwark. BY.
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ardarossan

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #20 on: April 20, 2013, 05:42:27 pm »

I'm sure if you where genuinely interested, you would 'google' it, and find dozens of definitions for 'bulkhead' and its origin.
Here's one;

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulkhead_'partition'The word bulki meant "cargo" in Old Norse. Sometime in the 15th century sailors and builders in Europe realized that walls within a vessel would prevent cargo from shifting during passage. In shipbuilding, any vertical panel was called a "head". So walls installed abeam (side-to-side) in a vessel's hull were called "bulkheads." Now, the term bulkhead applies to every vertical panel aboard a ship, except for the hull itself.

Worked for me.

There are many other references.
My usage? 4 generations before myself of seafarers(civil & naval) / builders, engineers and designers, me, outside my day job, I just mess about in small boats and design, draw & build model boats & ships.
cheers
vnkiwi  %)

Great attitude - Not! I'd already spent HOURS trying to find the appropriate term with little joy. Prior to daring to ask for supporting evidence on here, many of the results I found seemed to say the same thing, that bulkheads (when used in the context of  a ship, aircraft or building), were structural and internal wall, which divide a space into sections.
The specific ship references also seemed to indicate that bulkheads were only to be found inside the hull (although I realise that this must be a generalisation dure to the infinite numbers of vessel variations).

FYI, The example you provided, (which I'd already found) is actually the etymology of the word, not strictly a definition, and not from a reliable or definitive source either.

Hey, chill people...this is supposed to be a friendly forum with and exchange of info!!

I've been at sea for 20 years and never referred to it as anything else...it's not been a problem for me!

However if this helps, it's a reference document from a Classification Society.....all ships are registered under these and surveyed regularly from keel laid to run up on some beach and recycled!
http://www.veristar.com/content/static/veristarinfo/images/4930.29.577NI_2012-07.pdf

Scroll down to 1.2.7 for a reference to 'External Bulkheads'. Then go have a cuppa and relax!!

Jimi


Jimi, thanks very much for taking the time to do that.

The reference (copied below) applies the term to the 'External bulkheads of sleeping and mess rooms' though. Could this not mean the bulkhead's that define the extremeties of a habitable section, and not necessarily from the elements?
"1.2.7 The details of construction shall be as follows:
a) External bulkheads of sleeping rooms and mess rooms should be adequately insulated. All machinery casings and all boundary bulkheads of galleys and other spaces in which heat is produced should be adequately insulated where there is a possibility of resulting heat effects in adjoining accommodation or passageways. Measures should also be taken to provide protection from heat effects of steam or hot-water service pipes or both. In general insulation materials with thermal conductivity factor K value of 0.036 W/m2K for external boundaries or equivalent are to be used."

Thanks once again, Jimi.

Andy
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dodes

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #21 on: April 24, 2013, 01:34:18 pm »

When I was at sea, the covering material to accomodation areas which was attached to ships side or steel bulkheads was always refered to as lining, when you spoke to shipyards etc to get work done.
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Shipmate60

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #22 on: April 24, 2013, 01:51:37 pm »

We used to call them Superstructure with a location.
Ie Port Accommodation Superstructure.

Bob
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gondolier88

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #23 on: April 25, 2013, 09:53:13 pm »

Smaller ships, steam yachts and the like, that have monocoque superstructures that cover the engine space/boiler space etc refer to the superstructures as 'casings'. On SY Gondola we have both engine-room casings and smokebox casings, but both are bolted together at the smokebox casing/engine-room casing bulkhead!


This also applies to timber constructions, and launches/yachts less than 100ft always refer to the superstructures over machinery spaces as 'casings'.


The book 'From tree to sea' explains where many of the terms came from in modern shipbuilding- being simple extensions of the terms used in timber vessels in the last 3-400 years.


A little further on the ceiling of a boat, while the term became known to cover the the (usually timber) inner cladding of the hull in a cargo hold, it's use was far more important in ships of yore, the ceiling was basically a second hull, tieing in the grown frames and futtocks for most, if not all the length of the ship. The bottom plank of which was usually the keelson, which in historic terms is the plank that goes over the frames and floors where they themselves cross the keel. The keel piece where the frames cross is known as the hog, traditionally. However most shipbuilding yards describe the top of the keel bar as the keelson, where in actual fact in modern ships neither a traditional hog or keelson exists!


In modelling terms of course, you can point and say 'that bit there'!


Greg
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dodes

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Re: Name of ship part
« Reply #24 on: May 01, 2013, 12:57:05 pm »

I know bob, but if it is not a partion bulkhead and you needed work on the claddind, when in a shipyard I always refered to the name of the space, then bulkhead/ships structure then lining. But I think this thread can run for a long time, if there is a shipyard shipwright on site can they add there 3 penny worth. I expect I am wrong my wife tells me constantly so???
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