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Author Topic: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls  (Read 3793 times)

sparkey

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 %) Today I was thinking about when I was a teenager, I used to go to Model Making at evening classes and this old boy was making a model of a sail boat using the bread and butter method for the construction of the hull,at the time it did seem a lot of hard work but I must admit it made a really handsome hull and strong as steel, I would bet it is still around today,Ray. %) %)   
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essex2visuvesi

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Re: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2013, 05:02:55 PM »

I recently sold an Igra Golden hind kit that was that type of construction.... Looked like a lot of work to get the hull shape
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eddiesolo

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Re: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2013, 05:06:13 PM »

I have enough problems with my boats without the ducks going after my soggy bread and butter... {-)
 
But seriously, I know what you mean, they do make lovely hulls and as you say Ray, very strong.
 
Si:)
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Neil

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Re: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2013, 05:07:17 PM »

yes, but only for making plugs to mould grp moulds and hulls........
 
problem is that the usual timbers traditionally used for B & B hulls (yellow pine was the standard timber of use years ago.........and you now need a mortgage on your house to buy this.) is...it is now vastly more expensive than it was years ago......they are heavy unless you are a very good carver to hollow out the interiors, and they usually lack the space inside for motorised models because the planks usually specified on b & B plans are grosly too thick for r/c models, as they normally draw them at at least 25mm thick. There is much waste of timber when cutting the sections from a plank as well thus wasting money . Also you have to be a decent modeller to get the hulls spot on on both sides to effect a mirror image, or they can stand out a mile .....you also need very good sectional templates to work to when carving the outsides to get them straight, especially when using harder timbers than balsa.
 
On the good side they are usually totally watertight, don't twist like plank on fvram sometimes can and take some very hard knocks from other wayward boats on the lake.
 
you take your chance and make your choice.
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Netleyned

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Re: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2013, 05:09:54 PM »

Balsa bread and butter was easily sanded to shape.
Softwood a bit more work but with today's power tools
a tad easier.

Ned
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sparkey

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Re: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2013, 05:10:11 PM »

I have had more than my share of duck attacks mate,one ate my red ensign years ago,Ray.
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Colin Bishop

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Re: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2013, 05:22:00 PM »

Looking at the article by Ron Rees in the July 2013 issue of Model Boats it looks like it would be possible to use blue craft foam sheet instead of wood for bread and butter construction. Ron covered his model with an old stocking and epoxy finishing coat although I imagine the Deluxe materials water based Eze Cote resin would work equally well. You can buy Styrofoam sheet in 10mm thicknesses which is not far off the old half inch planking used for bread and butter model designs although you would need to replot the planks from the body plan.
I'm sure somebody must have tried it.
Colin
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raflaunches

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Re: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2013, 05:50:16 PM »

We used bread and butter method for the bows of our insect class gunboat, very easy to build up and sand to shape. The bows sides are solid and is plated with 1/32" plywood, testament to its construction she was hit by Klunks yacht at the mayhem weekend and no hull damage occurred, not even scratched paint!  :-))
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Shipmate60

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Re: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2013, 07:19:16 PM »

So that is why he is called "Klunk"


Bob
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Klunk

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Re: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2013, 08:04:46 PM »

nope thats not why im called klunk!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dastardly_and_Muttley_in_Their_Flying_Machines#Characters


look in section 2 klunk. my boss nicknamed me after fixing machines at work to get them through till the engineers could get in the next day.

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Klunk

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Re: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls
« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2013, 08:07:08 PM »

Thats not why im called Klunk.


section 2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dastardly_and_Muttley_in_Their_Flying_Machines#Characters


my boss named me afetr this chararcter as I fix all the machines at work till the engineers can get the correct parts!

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Shipmate60

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Re: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls
« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2013, 08:44:15 PM »

Of course Pete the accent gives it away!!   {-) {-) {-) {-) {-)


Bob
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Sandy

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Re: does anyone still use the bread and butter method for hulls
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2013, 01:06:32 PM »

I used bread and butter technique for both the bow and stern of my contre-torpilleur.
 

 
Knocked it into shape using one of those Permagrit things. In fact, I knocked it almost completely into shape with that and just a light sanding afterwards before the sanding sealer.
 

 
It all came up fairly well:-
 

 
I used Jelutong.
 
ATB
Sandy
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