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Author Topic: Le Tonkinois Varnish  (Read 4013 times)

Bob_V

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Le Tonkinois Varnish
« on: August 13, 2013, 08:59:42 PM »

Does anyone have any experience of spraying 'Le Tonkinois' varnish with an airbrush?

I am trying to get a 'wow' finish on a Cris Craft mahogany runabout but am failing miserably.

I am thinning with white spirit as suggested by the supplier but subsequent coats do not flow and cover the previous coat.
It's as if there is a greasy film on the previous coat. The suppliers say that there is no need to sand between coats so I have
tried with and without sanding (both wet or dry) but makes little if any difference

I've tried different thinning ratios and various pressures but cannot get it to build up the layers to a good finish.

Just about to bin the stuff but thought I would ask here first.

Bob.
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Bob Vaughan

derekwarner

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Re: Le Tonkinois Varnish
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2013, 10:53:50 PM »

Bob....there is a painting professional member here...."Dave  %) Stavors  "........ there is also thread topics on all sorts of painting & spraying as below.......I am sure he will offer a comment....Derek
 
http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/board,107.0.html
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Brian Roberts

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Re: Le Tonkinois Varnish
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2013, 12:12:37 AM »

Bob
I've used this varnish quite a lot and have had excellent results. Use a decent quality brush, don't thin the varnish but use it neat, and it is essential to lightly rub down between each coat - usually after at least 24hrs. In my experience if you don't rub down and apply a coat the varnish forms little globules which are unsightly and undesirable.Hope this helps.
Brian
 
 
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Bob_V

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Re: Le Tonkinois Varnish
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2013, 09:43:06 PM »

Derek,

Thanks for your link to Dave's (Stavros) posting on getting the best finish. Very useful. I must have missed that for some reason.


Brian,

Thanks for your input. I know I should be able to get a good result with this varnish but I have been trying to use my airbrush to get the best possible finish. The effect you describe of the forming of little globules of varnish is exactly the experience I have with the airbrush.

It seems likely though that the thinning with white spirit may be my downfall. I will now try using a brush and sand between coats. This of course leads me to ask some further questions which I hope you will be kind enough to answer for me.

1. What type of brush do you use?
2. What is the minimum time to wait between coats? (I have been waiting about 24 hours)
3. Do you wet or dry sand?
4. What grade of sandpaper do you use?
5. How do you degrease and tack rag after sanding?
6. How many coats do you normally apply to get the best finish?

The reason I tried this varnish was as a result of a series of postings by 'ukmike' on his build of the Riva Aquarama. He used 'Le Tonkinois' varnish on his superb effort and I was looking for a similar finish.

http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,31896.300.html


Bob. 
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Brian Roberts

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Re: Le Tonkinois Varnish
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2013, 10:16:10 PM »

Hi Bob
In answer to your questions:
1) A reasonably good 1" brush, I use a Harris one from B&Q. That one shouldn't deposit any hairs.
2) At least 24 hrs, if it's cold and damp, longer.
3) Sand wet.
4) Grade 400 or finer wet & dry paper.
5) Halfords Paint Preparation Wipes. You'll need 2 packs of 5 wipes per pack - use once only.
6) About 10 coats, the first 5 do the job but the second 5 give extra depth and a beautiful finish.
A tip; pour sufficient varnish for the job in hand into a clean container, this way you don't have to keep dipping the brush into the varnish tin and possibly contaminate the contents with tiny bits of debris. OK, it's possible to contaminate the varnish you've poured into the container, but the chances are very much reduced.
This is the way I do it, other folk may have different ideas but it works alright for me.
Brian
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Bob_V

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Re: Le Tonkinois Varnish
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2013, 03:02:41 PM »

Brian,

I think I am finally getting there with this varnish. The answer seems to be that due to the high shine you MUST thoroughly de-glaze the previous coat before adding the next coat. This is contrary to the makers instructions which state that subsequent coats can be applied directly on top of previous coats. As you say, if you don't de-glaze you will get globules of varnish in the finish. 

I also find that cleanliness is paramount. You must use panel wipe and also tack cloth between coats.

I have tried brushing but tend to get very small bubbles in the finish. This is probably down to my technique.

I have also tried spraying with a Badger 250 with excellent results. I filter the varnish first and then thin with white spirit to a ratio of two parts varnish to one part thinner. I spray with a pressure of about 25psi. The results I am getting now are excellent. Just need to build up the coats until I am satisfied.

Thanks for your help and guidance.

Bob.
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Bob Vaughan

flashtwo

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Re: Le Tonkinois Varnish
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2014, 07:38:41 PM »

Hi,

Sorry, but I've just noticed this thread.

I used a warm diluted (as per instructions) sugar soap solution to remove the oily coating from the previous coat and never experienced any globules.. I'm sure the English instructions, that came with Le Tonkinois, suggested doing that and it didn't need de-glazing either.

Ian
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Bob_V

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Re: Le Tonkinois Varnish
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2014, 07:44:04 PM »

Ian,

An interesting suggestion. I will try it next summer when I will probably be ready for another bout of varnishing.

Thanks for the tip.

Bob.
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Bob Vaughan

boatmadman

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Re: Le Tonkinois Varnish
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2014, 08:06:47 PM »

I also have used this varnish on a Riva with good results.
My comments and pics here:
http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,9714.0.html


Ian
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Bob_V

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Re: Le Tonkinois Varnish
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2014, 08:19:58 PM »

Ian,

Excellent finish!  Did you brush or spray? Also, did you rub down between coats?

Bob.
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Bob Vaughan

boatmadman

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Re: Le Tonkinois Varnish
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2014, 08:54:53 PM »

I brushed, 10 coats in total, left about 4 or 5 days between coats and rubbed down with 240 grit wet/dry between each coat.


I always put a couple of drops of washing up solution in the water I use, after rub down I then wash with clean warm soapy water, allow to dry, leave for a day or so to ensure it is completely dry, then wipe over with a soft cloth soaked in white spirit. Allow that to dry naturally, tack cloth it then varnish.


It worked for me!


In order to reduce the tine dust b#####s, leave your lights on as the varnish dries (they create static which attracts dust, and have a bucket full of clean water near where you are working, this also attracts dust.


If you have a dust free cabinet - use it!


Its a slow process, but the results are worth it.


Ian
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derekwarner

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Re: Le Tonkinois Varnish
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2014, 10:36:35 PM »

 <:(..mmmmm no importer for Le Toninkis in OZ....but I certainly agree with just a few drops of kitchen washing liquid in the water for W&D

It reduces the viscosity of the water and also provides lubricity O0... continual dunking of the paper in the water flushes and minimises any varnish build up :-)).... Derek
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Derek Warner

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Bob_V

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Re: Le Tonkinois Varnish
« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2014, 11:00:42 PM »

Ian,

Thanks for the feedback.

At that rate it must have taken at least ten weeks to varnish your Riva. As you say 'a slow process'.

Well worth the wait to get a finish like you have.

Bob.
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