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Author Topic: waethering on scale boats  (Read 2978 times)

justboatonic

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waethering on scale boats
« on: May 15, 2006, 10:36:42 PM »

I've noticed lots of scale boats look like they've just come off the slipway being all shinny and new. But what about adding some weathering as we all know ships soon get rust streaks and paint scrapes.

Has anyone any ideas how to add realistic rust streaks (orangey coloured paint doesn't quite seem to do it for me) and other 'natural' blemishes to age a model a little?

Cheers
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ron h

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2006, 10:44:15 PM »

I have never liked to much weathering, the thing is , if you dont get it right it looks terrible, its an aquired art , I prefure to paint in mat paint, then do a small amount of rust, with a dryish brush, and then give it a light coat of satin finish.
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ron h

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2006, 10:59:46 PM »

Here,s one done by phil scalles, just a hint of weathering, nothing over the top.
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malcolmfrary

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2006, 05:10:05 PM »

Having had a talk with Phil some several years ago, I modified his method a bit.  I tend to use Humbrol matt enamel for my models, and so have a quantity of mucky turps when I get to the end of a session.  I use this as very thin paint, sloshing it generously about, and watching where it runs.  It tends to collect in places where corrosion/muck will naturally collect.  The only bit to be careful of is the runs down any vertical surfaces, as the surface tension of the turps will make a tear-drop shape.  To sort this I have a dry brush handy to give these tear-drops a swift upward stroke, re-shaping the run and getting rid of the surplus.  This treatment needs repeating several times, as the effect can be very subtle when the turps dries out.  This means that you probably wont over-do it at any one visit.
That, and sailing regularly in salty water.
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Tom@Crewe

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2006, 05:46:56 PM »

I put up a post 'Most have one' in the Your Builds section, shows my weathered and rusty corvette and tells how I do it (wearthering that is)
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Roger in France

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2006, 05:42:41 AM »

I quite agree that a modicum of weathering is necessary. The only boats which should be pristine are lifboats, in my oppinion.

However, it is one of the two issues which usually classify model makers:

1. To weather or not to weather.

2. To add crew or not to add crew.

Roger in France.

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flag-d

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2006, 11:59:32 PM »

I agree with malcolmfrary: less is more.  I used the same techniques on my Fairmile type D and I think it looks good!  Try and think where rust might be seen: scuttle/hatch handles and hinges, corners of things which might get knocked.  By accident, I used the wrong shade of grey in a couple of places, but then thought it looked quite good, so added a few more patches here and there.  I also brush painted everything (mainly because I can't spray paint!) but also the original would have been brush painted too, so a few runs here and there are also visible.  The mucky turps/thinners idea is brilliant for adding 'dirt' streaks and the like.

Mike
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Didge

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2007, 05:16:13 PM »

'Rustall' is what you need. I use it on my model tanks. Brilliant stuff. 8)

http://www.rustall.com/
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hobbyman

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #8 on: June 28, 2007, 07:10:45 AM »

How about mixing some powdered rust with clear laquer? just a thought ,
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Ghost in the shell

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2007, 10:36:18 PM »

to start with, satin laquer seems to look better than plain Gloss or Matt finish, one looks too shiny, the other looks too flat

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malcolmfrary

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2007, 12:15:33 PM »

Weathering is not really a one-shot effort, it does need several liight shots to build up to the required effect, and if it need protection afterwards, fair enough.  I have never yet put protection on mine, and they do collect the odd scab and scar, but a bit of local repainting is all part of the weathering process.
If you use a real rust wash, it is probably better to leave it unsealed, as te iron oxide can be further weathered by mother nature.
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SimonO

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #11 on: December 26, 2007, 05:17:30 PM »

The following are created with ronseal wood stain and artist pastels + superglue.

http://s136.photobucket.com/albums/q196/sifromdevon/?action=view&current=TitanII.jpg

http://s136.photobucket.com/albums/q196/sifromdevon/?action=view&current=10.jpg

Just time and practise will recieve good results

regards

Si
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tigertiger

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #12 on: December 27, 2007, 07:50:47 AM »

Nice job Simon.

How did you do the exhaust. And what did you use for texture on the deck.

BTW I like the spill effect on deck.
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barryfoote

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #13 on: December 27, 2007, 08:29:09 AM »

For general weathering to make something like a coal carrier or similar dirty vessel, try "Black Milk". This is a simple but very effective way of aging and dirtying an model. get some ordinary household Matt black emulsion paint, add ordinary milk to it till it is much thinner. Apply liberally to a surface that has already had at one thin coat of varnish. Leave for a few minutes and then using a damp cloth, near to a supply of fresh water, try to wipe it all off again. You should be left with a dirty residue in corners and around fittings. Perfect for decking. If you wipe too much off. apply some more and rub that off. A little practice and you can get an excellent result. If you are not happy then simply wash it off with plenty of water.

Once happy with the result allow to dry and seal it in with more Matt varnish. See my Talacre below which was finished in this way.
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BarryM

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Re: waethering on scale boats
« Reply #14 on: December 27, 2007, 09:15:12 AM »

This subject has already been covered on this Forum in some detail. A search on past threads should bring up plenty of info.
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