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Author Topic: Local accents  (Read 5999 times)

Netleyned

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #25 on: November 16, 2013, 04:57:44 PM »

There you go Brian,
Pilgrims left Immingham (Ming Ming)
so might have had the Hullygully accent
that doesn't travel by road but maybe by Mayflower.

Ned
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essex2visuvesi

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #26 on: November 16, 2013, 06:15:09 PM »

My Stepchlidren in Finland speak 'Essex' English..... much to the annoyance of their English teacher  :D .


Their teacher actually annoys me as he has been teaching them a mixture of English and American English.... either teach one or the other  >>:-(
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derekwarner

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #27 on: November 16, 2013, 07:46:29 PM »

mmmmm have you watched any American video on silver soldering?........they tend to pronounce the material as "so-dar" ..... {-)  .....Derek
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McGherkin

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #28 on: November 16, 2013, 08:04:41 PM »

I really don't know why the USA is so against 'tourism', they even started a war against it.  %)

However I agree with the school's ban, because it's a ban on slang rather than accent. Media hype as per usual then.
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essex2visuvesi

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #29 on: November 16, 2013, 08:38:03 PM »

We were always told off at school for using slang words... for example Gissit (give it to me), aint, me instead of my (as in wheres me pencil) and for dropping ones Hs (Holiday becomes oliday)
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bill jardine

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #30 on: November 16, 2013, 08:50:25 PM »

My wife is from Yorkshire, and I'm from Glasgow. I don't think I've got a particularly strong accent, but she thinks otherwise.
She once hid a tape recorder behind the sofa and taped the conversation for 20 minutes.
Then she took it out, and played it back. All I could distinguish were a series of muffled grunts.
"Right," she said triumphantly at the end of the playback. "What did you say?"
"Ah don't know. "I  replied. "Ah wis talkin' tae you. Wur ye no' listenin'?"

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TheLongBuild

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #31 on: November 16, 2013, 08:57:49 PM »

"I  replied. "Ah wis talkin' tae you. Wur ye no' listenin'?"

 {-) {-) {-) {-)

BrianB6

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #32 on: November 16, 2013, 09:18:45 PM »

Down here I am told I have a beautyfull English accent.   :embarrassed:
In England I am told I have a very Australian accent.  >>:-(
What's a poor Pom to do?  <:(
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Peter Fitness

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #33 on: November 16, 2013, 09:34:56 PM »

Believe it or not, 'gonna' is a perfectly legitimate contraction of 'going to'. It has just fallen out of usage in British English. But is in common use in American English.

As George Bernard Shaw once said, "England and America are two countries separated by a common language".


TT, I'm horrified :o  Saying "gonna" is a perfectly legitimate contraction of "going to" is like saying that "yair" is an acceptable contraction of "yes". Americans may think they speak English, but in reality it's only a form of that language. They can't spell or pronounce what to us are simple words, and the sad part is that, due to the influence of American television, the disease is spreading rapidly. I know that the English language is continually evolving, and changes are inevitable, but to accept such appalling contractions as legitimate is just not on, old chap %)


Peter.
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essex2visuvesi

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #34 on: November 16, 2013, 09:45:02 PM »


TT, I'm horrified :o  Saying "gonna" is a perfectly legitimate contraction of "going to" is like saying that "yair" is an acceptable contraction of "yes". Americans may think they speak English, but in reality it's only a form of that language. They can't spell or pronounce what to us are simple words, and the sad part is that, due to the influence of American television, the disease is spreading rapidly. I know that the English language is continually evolving, and changes are inevitable, but to accept such appalling contractions as legitimate is just not on, old chap %)


Peter.


But then again you Aussies have a few of your own.... like fair dinkum and cobber :D
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derekwarner

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #35 on: November 16, 2013, 11:07:08 PM »

Goodness....where did ...saying "gonna" come from? .......sounds like the start of a word one's Doctor may suggest is related to describe a sexually transmitted condition.... <:( .
Now from my extensive readings of Grammar for Lawyers  :o ....we substitute the letter o for the letter u  ;D  & we end up with a word "Gunna" ....... which whilst is not is in the Oxford Concise Australian dictionary is clearly a mutation or abbreviation for the word gunner...which as we all know as being used to describe ..." Warrant Officer in charge of a battery"
Now this further translates to  an Official type of person who assists motorists who have the misfortune of suffering a flat battery in their motor vehicle %)
I rest my case  :kiss: ......ain't our English language grand ..........Derek
PS...that's another 10 cents commission please Professor Tulloch  O0
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Peter Fitness

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #36 on: November 17, 2013, 01:05:37 AM »


But then again you Aussies have a few of your own.... like fair dinkum and cobber :D


Very true, although "cobber" isn't often used nowadays O0 . "Fair dinkum" on the other hand, is used regularly.


When I first travelled to England, back in 1993, something that struck me was how noticeable the Aussie accent is when in a crowd. It can sometimes sound quite jarring, in fact, occasionally it sounded like scratching fingernails down a blackboard :o , it can depend on the individual.


I am constantly amazed at how such a small country as Britain can have so many regional accents, and it can be interesting trying to pick where a person comes from by his/her accent.


Peter.
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tigertiger

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #37 on: November 17, 2013, 01:09:59 AM »


TT, I'm horrified :o  Saying "gonna" is a perfectly legitimate contraction of "going to" is like saying that "yair" is an acceptable contraction of "yes".
Again, believe it or not.
Gonna is a standardised contraction. It isn't slang or poor English, depsite what people with a Br English tradition may have been brought up to believe. I actually raised the question in an English teaching class, my American teachers used it a lot, and taught it.
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tigertiger

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #38 on: November 17, 2013, 01:14:04 AM »

In fairness, Grammar for Lawyers, has little to do with vernacular English. Rules of legal English are there for precision with a particular purpose in mind, and are not the same as rules for what would be termed as common English grammar and use for any of the main 'standard Englishes'.
I don't know if it is the same today, but the case used to be that the only punctuation allowed in legal English/contracts (in the UK) was a full stop/period.
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Rottweiler

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #39 on: November 17, 2013, 01:19:51 AM »

best accent of all speaking of the best product here......


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjPhopki9sQ


Cornish and proud of it
Mick F
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vnkiwi

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #40 on: November 17, 2013, 01:31:02 AM »

I can't seem to win either, as when in Australia, I'm told I have a kiwi accent, but when at home in NZ, told I have an aussie accent.
When working in the UK, always assumed by others I was an Aussie.
Why can't we all speak (and spell) the Queen's English, as interpreted by aunty BBC.
Only ever meet one American, who spoke proper English, and he was from Boston.
Love listening to all the various dialects and accents from where ever I went in the UK.
Only twice did I not understand, some one when I stopped and aske for directions.
First day in London, asked a very dapper fellow in a suit, bowler and complete with brolly, very financual district, London, but he turned out to be from the middle east somewhere and only had a few words of English, the other when I stopped in the middle of Union Street, Aberdeen, and asked directions. After 3 attempts, thanked the kilt wearing gent, drove around the corner and asked some one else.
But that was before I actually lived and worked in Abredeen.
cheers
vnkiwi   :-))   
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tigertiger

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #41 on: November 17, 2013, 02:07:14 AM »

Here is a useless statistic, relating to received pronunciation (RP) a.k.a. 'Queens English', that was contained is in my MA applied linguistics materials (c.2000).
Only 2% of the UK population use RP, and only 4% of the English population use RP. That was over a decade ago.


Even Aunty's presenters and news readers uses regional accents now, and have done for many years, posh regional accents usually.
Why can't we all speak and spell like our good Lord did in the King James Bible?


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derekwarner

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #42 on: November 17, 2013, 02:25:36 AM »

 :}  ...& TT suggests.... "In fairness, Grammar for Lawyers, has little to do with vernacular English"  :((
This is not quite the case TT...as the whole premise of the book is ensure Lawyers simplify language so as to be able to be understood by both lay and professional
The text also notes........"whilst it is true there is no such thing as legal grammar, concise, correct & unambiguous writing is probably more important in the legal profession than any other"
 
......& so to ensure some smart ass#ed opposing Lawyer  >>:-( didn't bounce back with some semi legal conundrum   {-)  .....Derek
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Derek Warner

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derekwarner

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #43 on: November 17, 2013, 02:31:30 AM »

 O0  brilliant Mick.......only problem from my perspective is that they do not mention tomato sauce on the pasty............Derek  :P :P :P

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjPhopki9sQ
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vnkiwi

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #44 on: November 17, 2013, 03:16:01 AM »

Very well put TT.
My reference was based on my experience in the UK way back at the end of the 70's, and found upon my last visit to London some 8 years ago that BBC English had all but vanished from the airwaves, and moving picture tubes.
More's the pity as it was a common denominator which everyone understood, no matter where you lived or the dialect you spoke.
As regards different dialects in NZ, (and in Au) rather than becoming one, I now find it easier to tell where in NZ people came from, as the accents have become stronger, but find it increasingly difficult to understand the 'Americanisms' which have crept into the local language of the young, during my long absence 'overseas'.
Maybe, just maybe, I am starting to show the symptoms of starting to lose some of my youth.
Surely not
cheers
vnkiwi   {:-{
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Peter Fitness

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #45 on: November 17, 2013, 04:45:58 AM »

One of my favourite songs from screen musicals comes from the film, "My Fair Lady", in itself an adaptation of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion". In this song, Professor Henry Higgins bemoans the fact the even the English can't speak "properly". The latter part of the song is this


An Englishman's way of speaking absolutely classifies him.
The moment he talks he makes some other Englishman despise him.
One common language I'm afraid we'll never get,
Oh, why can't the English learn to set a good example to people whose English is painful to your ears?
The Scots and the Irish leave you close to tears.
There even are places where English completely disappears.
In America, they haven't used it for years!
Why can't the English teach their children how to speak?
Norwegians learn Norwegian, the Greeks are taught their Greek.
In France every Frenchman knows his language from "A" to "Zed"
The French never care what they do, actually, as long as they pronounce it properly.
Arabians learn Arabian with the speed of summer lightning,
The Hebrews learn it backwards, which is absolutely frightening.
But use proper English and you're regarded as a freak.
Why can't the English,
Why can't the English,
Learn To Speak?

http://www.allmusicals.com/lyrics/myfairlady/whycanttheenglish.htm

Peter.
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GAZOU

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #46 on: November 17, 2013, 05:16:25 AM »

 
Quote


The French never care what they do, actually, as long
as they pronounce it properly.

French,
for
the French province has become difficult to understand.
unassimilated people who live in the suburbs of large cities are becoming more numerous.
Their language and SMS destroy all French culture.
And it is inevitable .............................
Even the Bretons of Brittany schools, yet this language is spoken but not written. They invent a spelling and they are happy
Damage, France was "culture" and it becomes a mess 
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Peter Fitness

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #47 on: November 17, 2013, 05:53:39 AM »

The film was made in 1964, Gazou, a lot of things have changed since then <:(


Peter.
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GAZOU

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #48 on: November 17, 2013, 06:04:58 AM »

yes! I was 21 and all my teeth {-) {-) {-)
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Rottweiler

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Re: Local accents
« Reply #49 on: November 17, 2013, 08:28:24 AM »

O0  brilliant Mick.......only problem from my perspective is that they do not mention tomato sauce on the pasty............Derek  :P :P :P

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjPhopki9sQ


SACRILEGE iF ANY AT ALL MUST BE BROWN SAUCE >:-o >:-o <*< <*<
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