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Author Topic: Spraying Acrylic Paint  (Read 3079 times)

dougal99

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Spraying Acrylic Paint
« on: May 17, 2006, 05:41:51 PM »

Hi All,

Has anyone any experience in spraying Acrylic paint (humbrol/revell)? I managed to get a good finish on a small funnel in yellow, but have had endless problems with the superstructure (grey) both plastic. I can't seem to get the thinning right and when I do spray the paint seems to collect in small drops rather than cover the surface evenly. I have cleaned the surfaces to be sprayed so it shouldn't be grease causing the drops.

I was told once to thin the paint using thinned car windscreen wash, as this reduced the surface tension in the water, but it didn't seem to make much, if any, difference.

Any advice gratefully received or it's back to enamel.

Cheers

Doug

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DavieTait

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Re: Spraying Acrylic Paint
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2006, 06:19:35 PM »

You should undercoat whatever your spraying when spraying Acrylic paint. A tin of Halfords matt black undercoat does work very well especially on plastic.You should never water down acrylic paint as it doesn't spray properly. I'll Email my mate Tony as he's a pro-model painter that uses an airbrush all the time for his tips on thinning Acrylic paint. You can get a good Grey cover over a matt black undercoat using two thin layers ( i've done tanks the same way ). I'll get back to you as soon as I can get hold of Tony and let you know what to do. The model below took him an hour with an airbrush so he knows what he's doing !!.

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dougal99

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Re: Spraying Acrylic Paint
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2006, 07:14:25 PM »

Davie,

Thanks for your input, I await your further advice.

Blimey, and I thought we had trouble with vermin!!!  ;D ;D ;D

Cheers

Doug
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DavieTait

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Re: Spraying Acrylic Paint
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2006, 07:34:02 PM »

And the model above is 12" long by 8" high and it still only took him just over an hour and it isn't finished yet !!

I've Email'd him so as soon as I have the reply i'll let you know.

Davie
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DavieTait

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Re: Spraying Acrylic Paint
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2006, 12:10:48 PM »

Ok Doug here's what you need to know. My Mate Tony only uses Tamyia Acrylic and uses 10% Tamyia Thinners. Some modellers use the Vallejo paint range ( they have a formula which is supposed to be for airbrushing ) but Tony doesn't rate it at all. All other Acrylic's tend to have poor coverage , run's , blotching and almost always end up blocking the airbrush with dried up paint in the nozzle.

For covering large area's i'd suggest using a matt car spray over an undercoated base of black for most darker colours or white for the lighter colours. Halfords 500ml Tins are pretty good. If you do make a horlics of things and you need to remove Acrylic paint ( if the painted bits are plastic card or metal that is and can be removed and placed into a tub , ice-cream tubs are ideal  ;) ) then soak them for 24-48 hours in cheap brake fluid , remove and gently scrub under warm water using a tooth brush but remember to wear gloves and have the room well ventelated too as the fumes wouldn't be great for your health. For purely metal parts that the paint hasn't taken to properly use the above or use Mr Muscle oven cleaner spray which works especially well on Enamel paint's on any surface.

If you want to re-use the brake fluid buy a cheap metal sieve and line it with 4 sheets of kitchen paper. Use this to filter the brake fluid into another container for reuse. It will be discoloured but will work up to 4 times before it should be discarded properly at the local council dump. Just make sure that no water gets into the brake fluid and it will be ok.

Hope this helps.

Davie
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dougal99

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Re: Spraying Acrylic Paint
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2006, 06:54:55 PM »

Davie,

Many thanks, I'll look out for the Tamiya range and try again.  :)

Cheers

Doug
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DavieTait

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Re: Spraying Acrylic Paint
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2006, 08:23:32 PM »

Doug I think you might even be able to get Tamyia spray cans , they're small but would save on mixing, etc.

Davie
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Re: Spraying Acrylic Paint
« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2006, 11:32:59 PM »

re. the brake fluid:

It is hygroscopic, ie will take up water from the atmosphere so keep it in a closed container with as small an air gap as possible.  Also, I believe that many brake fluids are really inflammable so watch out for naked lights, sparks etc.

Mike
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DavieTait

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Re: Spraying Acrylic Paint
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2006, 11:54:42 AM »

Well remembered Mike. I keep mine in either the original container ( a cheap plastic funnel is ideal for pouring it back in ) or in a large Jam Jar with the lid screwed on tightly. As for the flamability , well if you have a car crash its always the Brake Fluid that ignites. Brake fluid has a very very low ignition point ( something like 150'C or so but I will find out ) so absolutely NO SMOKING or hot soldering Irons , keep away from exposed electric heater bars from portable fires. Always wear gloves and if you don't need glasses wear safety spec's.

I re-use brakefluid 3 times tops then take it to the local council tip for disposal. If you have paint build up on white metal, brass, etc then if your carefull you can use NitroMors. If you are going to use NitroMors then do so outside or at the door of your garage/workshop as the fumes are very noxious and WILL harm your lungs. Only soak the white metal for 5 - 10 minutes tops before scrubbing the cleaner off with an old toothbrush in warm soapy water , ALWAYS wear gloves and eye protection and a face mask for the fumes. Throw away the toothbrush after using it to clean off NitroMors as it will be useless afterwards ( cheap multi-packs from pound stretcher are ideal ). I clean paint off white metal 28mm wargames figures all the time and so long as you stick to the above you will not damage the parts or loose detail from the castings.

Davie
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