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Author Topic: Dented plating  (Read 2028 times)

Nordsee

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Dented plating
« on: February 03, 2014, 05:34:04 PM »

Just finished a interesting book, Great Britains Maritime Heritage, very interesting, a few errors I noticed ( HMS Belfast had 9,x 6 Inch guns, sure it was 12 !!) But there was a photo of HMS Ark Royal just after she was finished, before being put into Reserve.(The book was written in 1982) What I noticed is that although a new ship all of her hull and Super Structure all the metal plates were dented, dificult to do on a model, I have seen this before on photos of actuel ships in model mags. Not the old WW2 ships, just the modern ones.Must be the plating today is just to keep the water out, not for protection where much thicker steel was needed.
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Colin Bishop

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Re: Dented plating
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2014, 06:23:57 PM »

The 'denting' is a result of the welding process instead of riveting. Quite hard to model but it has been done. Plate thickness is probably the same though.

Colin
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html

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Re: Dented plating
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2014, 08:20:09 PM »

Yep as Colin has said all to do with welded ships instead of riveted, I would think the plates might be thinner given the advancement of steel making technology. Trouble is to stress relief welding you really need to heat up the surrounding area before you weld, not so easy on a ship.

Brian
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dodes

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Re: Dented plating
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2014, 08:39:57 PM »

Modern warships are referred to in maritime parlance as thin skinned vessels compared to similar size merchant vessels, that's why they are treated with kid gloves by tugs and pilots, because they are very easily damaged, but their strength I would believe lies in strong framing design. 
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boat captain

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Re: Dented plating
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2014, 09:28:57 AM »

Yep as Colin has said all to do with welded ships instead of riveted, I would think the plates might be thinner given the advancement of steel making technology. Trouble is to stress relief welding you really need to heat up the surrounding area before you weld, not so easy on a ship.

Brian
All welding of the rings bow and stern all hull penetrations and major structures on the hull of submarines are stress relieved with heat treatment. 

Joe  :-)) :-)) :-))
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Colin Bishop

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Re: Dented plating
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2014, 10:24:23 AM »

Quote
All welding of the rings bow and stern all hull penetrations and major structures on the hull of submarines are stress relieved with heat treatment. 

Applies to us elderly model boaters too - a hot bath does it for me!  ok2

Colin
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Neil

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Re: Dented plating
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2014, 05:17:32 PM »

remember seeing a model in Model Boats some many years ago where the modeller won gold and the ultimate prize( forget what it's called now) at the Model engineering exhibition for his ( I think ) HMS Dido..........it was just sublime modelling, and all plates on his model featured this "weathering".. 

maybe Colin could enlighten you of the year and model, but the modeller explained in detail how he worked the plating.

neil.
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Liverbudgie

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Re: Dented plating
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2014, 05:49:08 PM »

Are you thing of David Browns fine example of HMS Cornwall? Eric Dyke did something similar using very thin batons and tissue paper many years ago.

LB
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Neil

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Re: Dented plating
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2014, 05:56:36 PM »

Hi Jon......in the back of my mind it was a WW2 class destroyer, similar to Daring, but the name DIDO came to mind.......wasn't a "modern" warship.
and it must have been in the early 80's that I saw it.

neil.
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Colin Bishop

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Re: Dented plating
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2014, 05:59:17 PM »

Yes, David Brown's HMS Cornwall in the 2008 Model Engineer Exhibition showed what could be done, can't remember just how he did it though!

Colin
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steve pickstock

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Re: Dented plating
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2014, 08:17:22 AM »

I saw it done once and the modeller explained he had glued cotton threads across the hull in a grid pattern and then applied cigarette paper over the top to get that effect.
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dodes

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Re: Dented plating
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2014, 08:48:45 PM »

Hi Collin, first model of a fairly modern vessel that shows the hull as in reality, very nice to see. The chat earlier about heat treatment on subs, reminded me when I joined H.M.Dyd Chatham as an apprentice, we were all given a guided tour round the yard. Remember outside the blacksmith shop seeing the ovens dated 1865 and the peg board where each individual sub frame was made, with an allowance of + or - 1/16th of an inch. They heated the metal to red heat moved it out onto the pegboard then beat it around the forming pegs with 14lb hammers, they also had another frame for beating hull plates into shape before fitting to the build. The yard was given a cold roller machine 3 years after building stopped in the yard. But every thing then was designed and built to go in the hull in pieces, as the yard never cut a section through the hull to replace gear as they believed it would adversely affect the subs diving depth. In fact the first sub to go out of the yard to private contract, the contractors cut a long section out to change an engine quickly, but the public was never told that the subs safe diving depth was severely reduced after the refit because of it , only the private yard was quicker and cheaper.
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