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Author Topic: Cutting my own planking  (Read 3457 times)

troutrunner

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Cutting my own planking
« on: February 17, 2014, 09:48:05 AM »

Hi All,

I was just wondering if it is practical and worthwhile cutting my own planking strips, I have a Burgess band saw which I have made a fence for, I'm going to give it a try anyway. Any tips would be great.

What type of wood should I use and what widths and thicknesses would I need please
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Peter Fitness

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Re: Cutting my own planking
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2014, 10:04:03 AM »

I cut my own planking from 1.5mm ply or suitable thickness pine using a Proxxon miniature table saw. The width would depend on the scale of the model you're building. As to thickness, I would suggest 1.5mm to 2mm thick, although that too would depend on the size of the boat. Planked decking, if laid on a sub-deck, needs to be no more than 1 to 1.5mm thick, as it's purely cosmetic.


Peter.
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troutrunner

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Re: Cutting my own planking
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2014, 10:27:39 AM »

Thanks for the reply Peter,
   it's the fishing boat Eileen that I have it in mind first, it's approx. length is 28inches and approx. 8inches wide, it doesn't seem to mention the scale on the plan and I'm not sure how to work it out.
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Circlip

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Re: Cutting my own planking
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2014, 12:29:42 PM »

Look for the length of a full sized similar boat and convert its length into inches, then divide this by 28 and the answer gives the scale.
 
  Regards  Ian.
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Netleyned

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Re: Cutting my own planking
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2014, 12:40:32 PM »

I would hazard a guess at 1/24.
That would give a full size of 56 ft
about right for that type of of fisher.

Ned
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troutrunner

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Re: Cutting my own planking
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2014, 05:38:51 PM »

I think I have answered my own question on will the band saw do the job, but would still like to know more about thicknesses and types of wood for different jobs, firstly planking the hull, what's best for this job please.

Some photy's of my efforts  :-))

This is what I started with, a bit of old wardrobe, teak I think.
 

I first sized it up on my table saw, then set the blade distance from the newly made fence at approx. 1.5mm.




The result  :-))


I think a little sanding is in order.


I got 18 lengths of 34inches from the first bit and recon I will get another 16 from the other bit  :-))
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Peter Fitness

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Re: Cutting my own planking
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2014, 11:17:39 PM »

Those planks look pretty good to me Paul. Generally, the wood available to you in the UK is different to that readily available to us here in Australia, but I would suggest that as long as it doesn't crack when bent to the shape of the hull it should be OK. I normally use planks about 2mm thick for hulls, and the models I've built are usually about 80 - 90 cm long. I also use fibreglass matting as reinforcement inside the hull, laid between the frames, to help stiffen it.


Peter.
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morley bill 1

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Re: Cutting my own planking
« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2014, 10:35:52 AM »

Lime is good for planking strait grain and bends well regards   Bill....
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troutrunner

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Re: Cutting my own planking
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2014, 11:14:59 AM »

Where do I get Lime wood from please Bill :-))
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boatmadman

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Re: Cutting my own planking
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2014, 11:45:19 AM »

Cedar is also very good for planking, long straight grain, bends well and finishes really nicely.
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morley bill 1

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Re: Cutting my own planking
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2014, 03:33:34 PM »

there used to be adverts for twigfolly im sure he did lime try model boats magazine ads   bill....
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troutrunner

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Re: Cutting my own planking
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2014, 10:15:40 PM »

Thanks for the links :-))

Had another dabble at cutting some more planks today, this is a different wood, I have no idea what but it is very flexible, I twisted it a turn and a half without it even showing any sign of snapping. It's another bit of salvage from the old Shrieber wardrobe, anyone any ideas what wood it could be................

The twist  :-))


Any ideas ?
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