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Author Topic: Freelance Trawler style yacht build  (Read 5375 times)

CyberBOB

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Re: Freelance Trawler style yacht build
« Reply #25 on: July 05, 2014, 10:38:42 pm »

Next I covered the roller with heat shrink tubing, and heated it.  Unfortunately, this didn't quite look right.  As the heat shrink decreases in diameter, the tube thickness increases.  This made the diameter too large, and obscured the detail too much.  Although this didn't work in this instance, I think it would work beautifully on a larger roller.
 
So, back to the drawing board - I recreated the tube wrapped in copper wire.  I then trimmed the edges flush with the copper wire.  I placed the roller on some wire.  I painted the roller with a fine artists brush and some black acrylic paint.
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CyberBOB

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Re: Freelance Trawler style yacht build
« Reply #26 on: July 05, 2014, 10:42:32 pm »

Using a pin vise, I drilled a hole through the side of the anchor platform, put the roller in place, and inserted a pin to hold the roller in place.  A drop on super glue was used to hold the pin in place.
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CyberBOB

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Re: Freelance Trawler style yacht build
« Reply #27 on: July 05, 2014, 10:52:01 pm »

The windlass was built up by using 4 pieces of Plasticard.  The two middle pieces are cut out of .060" plasticard.  They were rough cut, glued together, and filed to achieve the right shape.  The two outer pieces are cut out of .040" plasticard, filed to shape and glued on.
 
The drum and gypsy were turned on a drill, as the diameter is too small to fit in the chuck of my dad's lathe.  I could have turned a larger rod down, but my dad lives across town, and it seemed like a lot of effort for two such small pieces.
 
A hole was drilled through the windlass, and then I painted it.  The drum and gypsy were glued into the hole, and the whole works received multiple coats of clear coat.
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CyberBOB

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Re: Freelance Trawler style yacht build
« Reply #28 on: July 07, 2014, 03:59:02 am »

I glued the chain locker in place.  I filed 2 limber holes on the bottom, so any water making its way down the naval pipe can run out.  The deck and outer side of the bulwarks was masked, and the inside/chain locker painted white.
 
The cap rails are made of mahogany.  There is a groove running the length of them on the bottom to fit over the bulwarks.  The curve at the step up was achieved by steam bending.  Some assistance was used in the form of Mrs. CyberBOB's curling iron (with her permission of course O0 ).  This worked great, as I took the steamed plank, and put it in the curling iron.  The spring loaded bit that normally holds hair kept the plank in place, and applied gentle pressure to the plank to achieve the tight curve.  The curling iron has some type of nonstick coating on it, so was easily wiped clean when I was done.
 
The curved caps around the bows were sawn.  Everything was glued on, and filed/sanded smooth.
 
The anchor platform is just resting in place, and won't get glued into position until I have finished laying the polyurethane on the mahogany.
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CyberBOB

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Re: Freelance Trawler style yacht build
« Reply #29 on: July 07, 2014, 04:03:58 am »

After filing/sanding was complete, I tacked the dust off with a tack cloth.  I then proceeded to mask it.  I just used cheap painters masking tape, but cut new edges with a ruler and exacto knife, and burnished the edges down.  Only the first coat of poly has been applied here.
 
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CyberBOB

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Re: Freelance Trawler style yacht build
« Reply #30 on: July 13, 2014, 05:20:41 am »

Once the cap rails were done, I started on the handrails.  I've always liked the rails on the Island Gypsy trawler.  They are a little different, and I thought they would be a nice change.  They use bronze stanchions with teak caps around the aft half of the boat, with a bit of a reverse angle and curlicue.  Forward of that is polished stainless steel.
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CyberBOB

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Re: Freelance Trawler style yacht build
« Reply #31 on: July 13, 2014, 05:23:59 am »

I started by cutting a small piece of mahogany in a Z shape.  I then glued thin strip on top.  The Z shape was carved, scraped and sanded into the reverse angle and curlicue.  It still needs a little work.
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CyberBOB

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Re: Freelance Trawler style yacht build
« Reply #32 on: July 13, 2014, 05:26:19 am »

To get the length, I used a little double sided tape under the curlicue, taped it into position, and using a square and pencil, marked the length at the transom.
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CyberBOB

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Re: Freelance Trawler style yacht build
« Reply #33 on: July 13, 2014, 05:36:07 am »

The half-lap joints I used on the window frames made such a solid joint, and not having any bracing under the handrails (apart from the stanchions), I decided to use them in the aft corners.  Of course hindsight is 20/20, and I should have used them at the aft end of the caprails as well, just for uniformity.
I cut these ones, as opposed to building them up like the window frames.  I thought about this for a long time before I did it, but decided this was the best way.  Turns out they were surprisingly easy.  I used a miter box and razor saw to make the shoulder cut, then used the razor saw freehand to make the cheek cut.  The cheek cut was the part I was worried about, but was surprisingly easy.  I then cleaned it up with a nail file.
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CyberBOB

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Re: Freelance Trawler style yacht build
« Reply #34 on: July 13, 2014, 05:37:52 am »

The joints were glued up.  Once the glue dried, it was just a matter of cleaning things up with a file and some sandpaper.
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