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Author Topic: steel rule storage  (Read 1947 times)

tobyker

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steel rule storage
« on: December 09, 2014, 04:41:33 pm »

If you take a CD drive to pieces (purely in a spirit of research, you understand) you will find inside a very strong magnet mounted on a piece of metal with convenient holes in. You can screw this to the side of a cupboard and it will hold about half a dozen steel rules including one of those heavy centre-finding rules. Very handy.
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html

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Re: steel rule storage
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2014, 06:34:29 pm »

Not if your rules are stainless steel, as mine are

Brian
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tigertiger

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Re: steel rule storage
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2014, 11:58:43 pm »

Yep, I didn't know that stainless steel was non magnetic, until earlier this year either.
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derekwarner

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Re: steel rule storage
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2014, 12:23:45 am »

Two of my Rabone 12" stainless steel rulers are magnetic..... so are martensitic...& not from the 300 series austenitic stainless material which is non magnetic

Just to add confusion to shiny metals........Chromium is non magnetic below 38 degrees C....but when subjected to temperatures above 42 degrees C becomes magnetic  >>:-(

This may not seem important to many....but a big  <*< <*< <*< erupted between two NATA accredited mechanical testing laboratories when measuring the chromium deposit thickness on hydraulic cylinder piston rods that had prematurely failed

The first reading was in the UAE @ 45 degrees C where the ship was built and the second test recorded in the North Sea @ 13 degrees C  %) ... Derek

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Derek Warner

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Colin Bishop

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Re: steel rule storage
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2014, 09:38:58 am »

One drawback with using magnets to store tools etc. is that the tool often becomes magnetised itself. You lay it down on the workbench and when you pick it up it has various odds and ends dangling from it. Sometimes these may be important or sharp and you don't notice them as they fall to the floor and you promptly tread on them... Pins are very good at this.
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Brian60

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Re: steel rule storage
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2014, 10:15:18 am »

It's a neodymium magnet, very very strong for their sizes. Which begs the question if magnetic fields can disrupt the storage capacity of a computer hard drive, why are they also inside the hard drive cases?

By the way this can be demonstrated if you try to open an old hard drive. Remove the screws to the cover, its impossible to pull it off against the magentic attraction, you have to lever it off with a sharp instrument.

BarryM

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Re: steel rule storage
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2014, 10:41:42 am »

When locating a (magnetic) steel screw in an awkward place, a magnetised screwdriver can retain the screw long enough on its tip to get the screw started. For non-magnetic screws, a bit of blu-tack or similar can also be useful.
Barry M
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malcolmfrary

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Re: steel rule storage
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2014, 11:13:35 am »

It's a neodymium magnet, very very strong for their sizes. Which begs the question if magnetic fields can disrupt the storage capacity of a computer hard drive, why are they also inside the hard drive cases?

By the way this can be demonstrated if you try to open an old hard drive. Remove the screws to the cover, its impossible to pull it off against the magentic attraction, you have to lever it off with a sharp instrument.
Its changing magnetic fields that change the data stored on a hard disc.  The non moving powerful one is probably one of the factors that makes the thing work in the first place, especially these days with the incredible density of data packed onto the disc.  Very likely it provides a stable magnetic environment inside the box that is powerful enough to be unaffected by any likely outside influences.
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