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Author Topic: Monsoon 900  (Read 5381 times)

tugboattam

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Monsoon 900
« on: March 30, 2015, 05:51:34 PM »

Hi all, After sailing motorised boats I have just now bought a yacht, my question is the mast just sits in a kind of depression in the deck, it does not sit deep enough to support itself until the rigging is fitted and tensioned. Is this correct ?  Thanks for any replies.
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JayDee

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2015, 08:08:16 PM »

Hello,

Yes, this way of mounting a mast is correct, deck stepped.
Both of my large yachts have their masts mounted this way.

The other way is to have the mast slide down into the hull.
But, if anything goes wrong with the rigging, all of the sail forces can cause the mast to badly damage the hull.
With the mast deck stepped, if the rigging is badly damaged, the mast can just fall into the water - - no hull damage!.
There will be rigging still attached to the mast, so nothing will be lost.

There are photos of my boats on my website, any problems - - just ask !!.

John.
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hmsantrim

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2015, 08:13:58 PM »

Hi Tam.
 there was a build one here you can have a look over if you have other questions. The deck stepped mast is the way most of the modern RC yachts are set up with the mast being supported by the wire shrouds.   
 frank
http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=14796.25
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mrpenguin

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2015, 11:18:56 PM »

Yes, that is correct. It is a deck stepped mast, not a keel stepped mast.


Monsoon is quite a good boat. Make sure you have the hatch sealed properly, it is low in the boat and water can get in when the boat heels. 


Many people replace the original shrouds with some fishing braid that does not stretch like the supplied  shrouds. 
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tigertiger

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2015, 01:24:51 AM »

**** Topics now merged ***
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mrpenguin

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2015, 01:55:51 AM »

meant to mention before, there is a forum at www.shipshaperc.com that specialises in this class of boat, may also provide you some useful information.

Much of the Monsoon stuff is gathered at http://www.shipshaperc.com/index.php/forum/monsoon

You don't need to be a forum member to see most of the stuff. Membership add access to the photos and some private discussion areas. The eBook is excellent.

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tugboattam

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2015, 01:06:59 PM »

Hello,

Yes, this way of mounting a mast is correct, deck stepped.
Both of my large yachts have their masts mounted this way.

The other way is to have the mast slide down into the hull.
But, if anything goes wrong with the rigging, all of the sail forces can cause the mast to badly damage the hull.
With the mast deck stepped, if the rigging is badly damaged, the mast can just fall into the water - - no hull damage!.
There will be rigging still attached to the mast, so nothing will be lost.

There are photos of my boats on my website, any problems - - just ask !!.

John.


Wow !!! what a lot I have to learn but at least that build link was very helpful ( I now know what a bowsie is )
I got my boat very cheap from Ebay but it does not have a battery box or receiver, can you tell me doe it require 2 or 4 AA batteries ? Also which is better for a yacht  27 MHz with the ariel running up the mast or 2.4 ghz with the shortl ariel  that will be inside the hull ?
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tigertiger

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2015, 03:21:32 PM »

2.4G if more versatile, as you will never have channel clashes with other users, as it looks for available channels in its range when you switch on. Also it is easy to buy another receiver for a different boat, you then can easily switch boats using the same transmitter.


With 27MHz you have fixed crystals. If someone else is on the same channel, you either can't both operate, or one of you must change crystals.



Antenna really isn't an issue. I have a boat with 27MHz and antenna running around inside the hull, no problems.



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Netleyned

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2015, 04:22:29 PM »

Two point four is the way to go for convenience.
Throw the Yacht in the lake having switched on first 8)
No bother with frequency clashes.
I run 4 yachts from a Marblehead down to a n RG65 all on 2.4.
The receivers are either velcroed to the underside of the deck
or stood upright with th aerial uppermost
No probs with range over a 300 meter lake.
Enjoy the leaning curve  :-))

Ned
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tugboattam

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2015, 05:19:00 PM »

Thanks for the reply.  in all my motorised boats I use a BEC receiver with this one running from a battery box is it 2 or 4 batteries ?  Sorry to be such a numpty.


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Netleyned

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #10 on: March 31, 2015, 05:26:56 PM »

Four nimh at 4.8 Will do.1.2 v each rechargeable battery

Or four AA cells will give a bit more power.

Ned
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tugboattam

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #11 on: March 31, 2015, 06:58:52 PM »

That's great Nettleyned.

            Now the big question how do you tack into the wind ?
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hmsantrim

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2015, 10:20:52 PM »

Hi Tam.
 Ok lets start with the clock face, say you heading is from  5 Oclock to 11 Oclock the wind direction is from 1 Oclock. There is a good breeze blowing you have let the sails out a bit and you are cruising along.  Now you have sailed along that course as far as you can and its time to "come about" = Turn round  push the stick right over for a left hand turn as you come out of the turn the sails will flap so haul them in a bit and head down towards 7 Oclock.  You can go so far on that heading then you have to tack gain crossing the direction of the wind to get back to start.   
photo imagesCAMJG2MG_zps6rahhqlw.jpg
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tigertiger

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2015, 02:15:07 AM »

To add to what HMSAntrim said.


The figure implies that you can sail 45 degrees into the wind. Actually you can sail closer to the wind. If you do this you can maintain a different heading, but you will lose speed. However, sometimes you may need to sail closer to the wind to avoid obstacles.
To sail closest to the wind, you need to pull the sails all the way in. The boat will also heel over, and she looks like she is going very fast (in fact she is not going at her fastest), and is impressive. As you steer into the wind, she will reach a point where she just loses power. The first clue is that the boat will sit more upright and then the jib/foresail will start to ripple/flap along the trailing edge. With practice you will learn where this point it, and turn away or tack just before it loses power.


You also need to make sure your sails are aligned correctly.
Jib 5 degrees off centre when fully hauled in.
Mainsail 10 degrees off centre when full hauled in.
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tugboattam

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #14 on: April 03, 2015, 03:43:21 PM »

Hi, Sorry its taken me so long to reply. I now have the boat fully rigged and I've fitted a 2.4ghz transmitter and receiver, the rudder is very responsive and works just as I want it to but Im not sure about the sails, when the stick is in the central position the sails are extended ( about 60 degrees from centre line of the boat ) when I move the stick to the top position the sails come in to the 5 degree jib and 10 degrees mainsail that you recommend. Is this correct ? as I had expected it to be the other way round. ( stick central and sails central ) Thanks for any reply.
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Netleyned

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #15 on: April 03, 2015, 03:58:56 PM »

The Main should come in to the centreline with the job 10-15 degrees off
centre. This gives a slot for the air to travel over the front side of the mainsail
just as an aircraft wing.
If you Google Ivor Bittle you will find a host of setup tips.

I think TT has transposed the settings.
You should set up the transmitter so that the sails are right
out at full up stick and right in at full down stick
Centre stick should be sails half way out or half way in.
You can reverse the movement to give the stick positions
you prefer ie Full up stick sails full in.

Ned
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tigertiger

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #16 on: April 03, 2015, 04:26:36 PM »

I think TT has transposed the settings.
You should set up the transmitter so that the sails are right
out at full up stick and right in at full down stick


Yes, brain fart on my part.
Jib 10 Degrees out
Main 5 degrees out
This will give you the slot you need.


And yes, Tx stick full forward would normally be sails out. Full back sails in.
It is possible that the sheets/line has been wound on the drum the wrong way round.
I think my Monsoon 900 was the same, initially.
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Netleyned

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #17 on: April 03, 2015, 04:30:29 PM »

Hi TT
I meant the last paragraph  about sail angles when sheeted in.
You may have transposed the angles of main and foresail.

Ned
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Netleyned

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #18 on: April 03, 2015, 04:32:14 PM »

I love these Mods :-))

Much too quick for me 8) 8)

Ned
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mrpenguin

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #19 on: April 03, 2015, 11:19:40 PM »

@tugboattam:
From your post I get the impression the sail control stick may be spring loaded?


The usual setup is that the sail control does not centre but has a friction ratchet so it stays where you put it. If this is the case you may be able to open the radio and remove the spring.


Usual standard in my area is that moving the stick towards you hauls the sails in (sailing close to the wind) and moving the stick away from you lets the sails out for downwind run. If you have a reversing switch on the radio you should be able to set this however you want.
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tugboattam

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Re: Monsoon 900
« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2015, 11:09:33 AM »

Hi Mr Penguin, Yes you are correct, I put the spring in as I preferred it for my motorised boats. I will try the mods you suggest and see if I can remember where I saw the ratchets. Many thanks.
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