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Author Topic: Signals - What to hoist?  (Read 2493 times)

tonyH

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Signals - What to hoist?
« on: April 22, 2015, 04:39:13 pm »

Hi All,

I'm finishing the detail bits on a US Navy Flower and would appreciate if someone could advise what hoists would be correct for the following.

1. 'Keep Station' (to ships in a convoy for example) and
2. 'Am dropping depthcharges'

Thanks

Tony
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Skimmer Fan

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Re: Signals - What to hoist?
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2015, 05:11:29 pm »

Is this the sort of thing you require
 
http://www.anbg.gov.au/flags/signal-flags.html
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Bob K

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Re: Signals - What to hoist?
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2015, 05:20:26 pm »

Setting up flag signals between the house and workshop may sound a good idea . . .
However "X" flown by the wife from the kitchen window usually means your building session is about to be terminated.

ie:  " X - stop carrying out your intentions and watch for my signals".

Or flown by British Airways :- "H - I have a pilot on board", but be worried if you see "G - I require a pilot".

After late night at Mayhem event:-  " D - keep clear of me, I am manoevering with difficulty"

Fly when your car indicators are fautly :=" E - I am altering my course to starboard"

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Colin Bishop

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Re: Signals - What to hoist?
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2015, 05:43:53 pm »

Or you could fly two black balls to signify that you are not under control - applicable to many Mayhem members.

Colin
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Netleyned

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Re: Signals - What to hoist?
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2015, 06:34:06 pm »

Code flags for convoys would be a one off in time of war.
Each convoy would be unique.
International code of signals does what it says in the tin.
International. Everyone knows what they mean. >>:-(

Ned
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Jerry C

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Re: Signals - What to hoist?
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2015, 07:06:24 pm »

When a warship hoists an international code flag it is always flown below the code pennant (known as interco) to differentiate from purely naval signals. Eg. Interco, golf:- I require a pilot.
Jerry.

tonyH

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Re: Signals - What to hoist?
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2015, 07:21:07 pm »

Cheers Chaps :-))

That's the sort I'm taking it from Skimmer and I've got the US Navy 'dictionary' that I'm basing it on.

Don't worry Bob, the shed flies a skull 'n bones and I can always loose off a shot over her bows (unless carrying tea of course!). This can also, unfortunately, lead to the two black balls %%

So, Ned and Jerry, is it likely that, each could just be the code pennant followed with a single letter?

Thanks again,

Tony

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Jerry C

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Re: Signals - What to hoist?
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2015, 07:39:38 pm »

A set of naval flags is larger and different to the international code flags. Some are the same visually but have different meanings. The code pennant just indicates that what follows should be read as international code. International code is used in conjunction with the international code of signals book. Although the official languages of the sea are English and French, (only the French use the latter) the code book can be in any language under the sun. Alpha Bravo Charlie in an English code book will have exactly the same meaning in any other language book. So if the other guy doesn't understand your language it's possible to communicate and understand each other's messages. Ie it's truly an international code. Military comms are totally different say between NATO navies and eastern block navies. Signals don't have to be sent only by flags. They can be spoken, morse (visual, sound or radio) or semaphore. In fact any method of transmission can be used but the items sent are letters and numbers taken from the code book.

Jerry.
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