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Author Topic: What a feat of engineering  (Read 5522 times)

Brian60

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What a feat of engineering
« on: September 11, 2015, 07:18:30 pm »

This would make a magnificent model. I reckon ballasting might be difficult with all that hanging off the starboard side though.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54Do3n0CM1A

warspite

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2015, 07:42:06 pm »

about a minute in of the video, did you notice how much there appears to a significant wobble at the top of the apparatus off the right hand side, some weird effect
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Tug-Kenny

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2015, 08:07:24 pm »

Well you've got my attention Brian.    {-)

What a beast.  A bit over the top methinks.

ken

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Brian60

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2015, 09:32:33 pm »

Be a gud un to have next to your seabex Ken.

Brian60

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2015, 09:35:14 pm »

about a minute in of the video, did you notice how much there appears to a significant wobble at the top of the apparatus off the right hand side, some weird effect
It happens about 30 seconds in as well mate. I reckon its down to the video compression to make the file smaller for youtube. Somebody has just done a poor job of it.

derekwarner

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2015, 10:19:21 pm »

I wonder if crane No 7 can swivel from midships anticlockwise x 300 degrees or just have a very high luff? .....Derek
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Seacommander

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2015, 12:02:55 am »



Looks magnificent and would make a great model for shore........

Wouldn't like to be on that,  in the middle of the Atlantic in a force 10.........

Mark 
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Tug-Kenny

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2015, 09:56:45 am »

Be a gud un to have next to your seabex Ken.

Well I do have another  Seabex hull, this time the original from the makers, sitting around waiting to twinned up maybe  !!!

ken
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nemesis

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2015, 05:56:15 pm »

What ever is on top has to be balanced by what is underneath, I would love to know what is under to balance that lot on top. Does anybody know the capacity of the crane? Nemesis
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nivapilot

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2015, 06:09:31 pm »

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Brian60

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2015, 08:56:15 pm »

5000t.?....according to this....http://www.subsea7.com/content/dam/subsea7/documents/whatwedo/fleet/rigidpipelay/Seven_Borealis.pdf.... :o

That is quite some statistics om that PDF. 127 cabins and berthing for 399 crew :o

oldflyer2

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2015, 11:02:14 am »

That is an incredible vessel!

Tom
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TailUK

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #12 on: September 15, 2015, 01:20:42 pm »

about a minute in of the video, did you notice how much there appears to a significant wobble at the top of the apparatus off the right hand side, some weird effect

I think that's an effect of the digital video. 
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Mad Scientist

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2015, 10:00:06 pm »

That is quite some statistics om that PDF. 127 cabins and berthing for 399 crew :o

Ooh! Cabins! A level of luxury I can only imagine.

They might have saved some space by doing things the Navy way - stuff them into seven 54-man messdecks.  378 berths, with the remainder (the senior ones, obviously) in 4-man cabins.  <*< After all, it isn't a pleasure cruise. ok2 - Tom
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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #14 on: September 19, 2015, 09:08:30 pm »

Here are photos which might help to answer your questions about what's under water to balance the crane on one of these ships...





If the photos don't show, here's the link to the article: http://gcaptain.com/ship-photos-crane-ship-wei-li-in-damen-drydock-for-maintenance-and-repair/#.Vf2-xpe8p_d

Tom
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derekwarner

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #15 on: September 19, 2015, 10:40:37 pm »

Hullo Tom...I think the answer to your question...'what's under water to balance the crane on one of these ships?'.....is nothing  >>:-(

The image of the vessel in dock show the substantial number of additional supports under the stern supporting the weight of the crane, [in addition to the standard dock block formwork], so water must be supporting that same mass when at sea & therefore the hull structure in turn must also be the consideration

The WEB site link didn't really explain the pair of horizontal structural tubular fenders at the bow at the waterline, however above them on both sides are what appear to be pairs of wire feed spooler sheaves. Again, the WEB site does not mention or explain any specific or unique engineering on board facilities.... Derek
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Brian60

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #16 on: September 20, 2015, 07:55:37 am »

Derek the structures on the bow are for docking a Stevpris / Danforth type anchor- much larger than the normal Hall ship mooring anchor. One would be deployed at each 'corner' of the ship to hold her in position while the crane was working. Nowadays its done with bow and stern thrusters and dynamic positioning via gps satellite. I remember working on a model of the Stena Seawell back in the mid 80's that had the same set up. The ship would be moored on station and the four winches would work together to keep the ship on station.

The way it works is, imagine a X your mooring position is in the centre. You manouvre to top right, drop the stb bow anchor, pay out the cable and manouvre sternwards to lower right, drop the stb stern anchor, pay out cable. Do the same for the other two legs and then manouvre back to centre, paying out or taking up cable on the winches as necessary. Once over your 'spot' all the winches tension the cables to hold you there.
As you will by now have realised, the time taken to achieve this could be the best part of a day. Arrive on station and hold yourself there with thrusters and dynamic positioning is so much faster- time is money!

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #17 on: September 20, 2015, 08:14:26 am »

Once over your 'spot' all the winches tension the cables to hold you there.


Would this be more stable than 'hold yourself there with thrusters and dynamic positioning', for crane use?
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Brian60

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #18 on: September 20, 2015, 10:56:46 am »

I suppose it all depends on what you are lifting. If you are drilling even semi submersible rigs still use cable and anchors to hold exact position, so cable/anchors still have a role to play over azimuthing thrusters and dynamic positioning systems.

warspite

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Re: What a feat of engineering
« Reply #19 on: September 20, 2015, 01:37:08 pm »

keeping on station by thrusters alone is ok for short term work like lifting a module on an oil rig, but if you drilling as this appears to be, then the fuel cost would be too great and a steady delivery difficult so paying out anchors is a more cost effective option for the time 'on station'.
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