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Author Topic: Deck planking  (Read 3119 times)

Glyn Roberts

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Deck planking
« on: October 20, 2015, 09:19:58 PM »

I am looking to improve the look of my deck planking and wondered how to get the dark lines between planks.   I experimented with pencil, biro pen and marker pen with dismal results.  So I am hoping that some mayhemer knows of a better way.  I do not like the marked decking printed on ply as its so artificial looking

Regards to all Glyn 
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david48

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Re: Deck planking
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2015, 12:16:43 AM »

Hi Glyn
Have you started planking or is ir already done and you are refurbishing an existing deck .
David
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Footski

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Re: Deck planking
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2015, 07:34:42 AM »

I use two different methods. For period ships, I use black rigging cord, by lying it next to a glued down plank and pushing the next one up to it. For more modern planking, I use black card, cut into thin strips, laid as above. Once finished a gentle sanding removes the raised bits, giving a flat finish.
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dougal99

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Re: Deck planking
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2015, 11:32:20 AM »

I use black cartridge paper at larger scales 1/16 and up. I glue the planks edge on to the paper and then cut them free leaving one edge covered in paper.
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Glyn Roberts

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Re: Deck planking
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2015, 01:35:20 PM »

Hi David,
Its a scratch build and I am ready to start laying down the decking, but have not as yet started.

Thanks footski and dougal99 for your input, will have to try them out.

Regards Glyn
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John W E

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Re: Deck planking
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2015, 03:37:34 PM »

Hi Glyn you may like to try this way of doing the deck planking


http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,33734.msg361489.html#msg361489

john
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Vintage

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Re: Deck planking
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2015, 04:30:03 PM »

Hi Glyn,

As mentioned above, black card works well and I've used it successfully on an MHB Topaz that I'm building.

Using a scraper to remove excess card, once the deck is laid, helps to avoid creating a black dust that can stain the timber...

Mark
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Unsinkable 2

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Re: Deck planking
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2016, 06:15:01 AM »

Vintage, that looks excellent I think I'll give it a try. :-))    U2
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Geoff

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Re: Deck planking
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2016, 01:47:03 PM »

Maybe a bit late but have you tried black electricians tape. This works extremely well. Put a number of planks on their edge and stick the tape to the planks. Turn then over then cut between each with a very sharp knife (use a pizza cutter if you have one as the round blade doesn't drag).


The just glue on to the decks. When finished uses Stanley knife blade on its edge as a scraper. The plastic tape scrapes off easily and leaves no residue at all.


I used this method on Iron Duke and the pictures show the effect. The black lines are very thin and very regular.


Cheers


Geoff
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Unsinkable 2

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Re: Deck planking
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2016, 01:11:10 PM »

This last week I have been busy doing what vintage suggested, I am pleased with my first attempt.


Top tip from hindsight....... When cutting the strips from the card leave a plank width on one end. This allows you to fold this piece into the gap between plank ends. You only need to do one end as the pieces fit top to tail and will always have a filler between. I didn't realise until it was to late so I only have black between the sides.


See Alantis in yachts and sail.    U2
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Laker

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Re: Deck planking
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2016, 07:47:10 PM »

Like Dougal99 I have used black card to simulate the caulking.  I stack up 5 or so planks, glue the edges of them down onto the card and when dry, slide a razor blade or scalpel along between the planks to leave each plank with a strip of card along the side.  You still need to stick a small piece of card onto the end of each plank as well, which is trickier.  My technique was to put superglue on the end of the plank and hold this down onto the black card until the glue holds.  Then use the scalpel again to trim around the end of the plank.  The attached photo shows the deck of my pilot cutter planked this way.  I used limewood which is almost white when unfinished.  The colour was applied with about 15 coats of strong black coffee.  The nice things about staining gradually with coffee are (1) you can keep adding coats until it is as dark as you need, (2) different planks take up the stain differently which makes the overall deck look more interesting and less uniform and (3) your model smells nice.  You need to finish off with a few coats of a good varnish.
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