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Author Topic: Static conversion- Marine modelling International  (Read 1516 times)

EJL

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Static conversion- Marine modelling International
« on: February 14, 2016, 01:03:34 PM »

 This is a static model of 1908 Dixie that I have converted to RC. Keep an eye on Marine modelling International mag as I am writing an article about the conversion work. (Its been a while since I last wrote for the mag)
 The static models keep appearing for sale on ebay.
 The poor quality dummy rudder system/drive shaft have been binned and a working system made and fitted as shown. It makes a nice RC model. I don't want to ruin my article so I wont be giving much away on here, suffice to say its not easy but worth the effort. Fitted with an inrunner brushless motor.
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EJL

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Re: Static conversion- Marine modelling International
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2016, 01:21:48 PM »

Shows it works!
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EJL

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Re: Static conversion- Marine modelling International
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2016, 01:24:05 PM »

This is another ebay static model I have converted. Edsel Fords Typhoon. More work to do with this one but getting there.
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inertia

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Re: Static conversion- Marine modelling International
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2016, 01:49:22 PM »

EJL
Very pretty, and very "different" models. How big are they - my guess is around 30" (800mm) long? Please post the date of the magazine publication when you find out.
DM
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EJL

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Re: Static conversion- Marine modelling International
« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2016, 03:26:16 PM »

Dixie is 36 inches long. Typhoon about the same.
Just a comment about the Typhoon. As a completed static model its around 300 on ebay at the moment. Dumas do an excellent kit of the boat that is far more accurate and is lighter. (I have a library of all the relevant books covering such boats) To convert the static model requires much cutting into the top particularly at the rear end to gain access to fit a the rudder system and the wood is very thick and hard! I am not at all sure that its worth the effort when an excellent kit is available.


Dixie is somewhat different because there are no kits to be had anywhere that I know of and to get a working model of a famous unusual boat is worth the effort and the amount of cutting is much less and easily covered up (engine bay hatch is the only area where cutting is needed)


BTW I think they are being produced in Vietnam and there a number of ebay sellers offering them for sale as an auction item or buy it now option.


Ernie Lazenby
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inertia

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Re: Static conversion- Marine modelling International
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2016, 03:51:40 PM »

Thanks, Ernie, but in my (admittedly limited) experience the words "excellent" and "Dumas kit" don't belong together on the same page.
300 seems a lot of money to pay for a static model, so I'll not be troubling the scorers on this occasion.
Shame.
DM
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canabus

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Re: Static conversion- Marine modelling International
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2016, 03:52:14 AM »

Hi
A 1920 racing runabout looks a bit  similar to these in Model Boats Special 2010 and 2016(the same one) by John Parker.
It is a bit small at 24 inches(610mm), so I rescanned up to 32 and 1/4(820mm).
I like my boats about this size, I can get my hands inside to work on and battery location is easier.
I general change the prop drive angle to a shallow-er angle by increasing the drive shaft length and moving the motor forward and closer to the keel. 
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