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Author Topic: Success, failure rates  (Read 1309 times)

kpnuts

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Success, failure rates
« on: July 10, 2016, 09:34:57 pm »

Hi all I've been going through my builds over the last 2 yrs and I've discovered I have about a 50 % success rate (this is based on what I consider a good build or a rubbish or shelved build) I then tried to analyse what went wrong on the kits I ruined and that is 100% painting problems.
Now what that tells me is my painting techniques are rubbish and I need to pay a lot more attention to that.
I'm interested to know what other people think their success failure rate is and what they think they need to work on.
I'm hoping this will be a useful thread and will help people to see their weaknesses. Obviously this will only work if we're honest. I would like people to give hints and tips on my painting and we could do the same for others who identify their weaknesses.
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Bob K

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Re: Success, failure rates
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2016, 09:53:23 pm »

My 'weakness' is submarines, the only two projects I have never been able to complete. 

A working model of the K9 steam powered sub that I could never get enough info on how all the watertight linkages went together, plus inability to source a critical sized LiPo that could not be shipped from the States.   :embarrassed:

The second is an Engle 212A.  Insufficient info supplied as to how to epoxy the bayonet ring into the hull so as to make an accurate rotational fit for the finished model.   :embarrassed:

I did spend nearly 5 years on my HMS Polyphemus semi-submersible project, but due to sheer pig headed determination was eventually able to solve all the buoyancy and plumbing problems.   :}

Suggestion:  If painting is a problem I suggest you invest in a really good spray paint system and take the time to get plenty of practice using it before committing to parts of a real model.  :-))
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HMS Skirmisher (1905), HMS Amazon (1906), HMS K9 (1915), Type 212A (2002), HMS Polyphemus (1881), Descartes (1897), Iggle Piggle boat (CBBC), HMS Royal Marine (1943), HMS Marshall Soult, HMS Agincourt (1912)

essex2visuvesi

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Re: Success, failure rates
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2016, 11:35:33 pm »

When it comes to model boats I have a 100% failure rate  :embarrassed:
I have yet to finish one


When it comes to plastic Model kits again 100% in the last few years, as I have failed to complete one
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chas

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Re: Success, failure rates
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2016, 12:09:45 am »

I'm in the same situation, and that's after 50 years of modeling. I have some fair paint jobs, but no excellent ones.
 Varnished wood is another matter, I've made several I'm proud off, yet the basic techniques are the same. This tells me that I can't apply myself with the same dedication to paint as to polished wood. We all have our weaknesses, so we just do the best we can and keep trying.
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Capt Podge

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Re: Success, failure rates
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2016, 12:31:58 am »

Logical sequencing is my main weakness. I tend to jump from one (unfinished) area to another and have to go back again, only to find that some work has to be dismantled through jumping ahead and missing something vital.

Just lately though, I've found that writing a 5 point memo for myself does help - provided I've written then in logical order. :embarrassed:

Regards,

Ray.
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BrianB6

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Re: Success, failure rates
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2016, 08:47:40 am »

I have one model of a Thornycroft ASR which I am sure has a death wish.
During building parts refused to stay glued, paint would not dry in one spot, parts fell off when I was not looking and even when it was sailable a perfectly good motor blew up followed by an ESC with what I consider normal use and paint peeled off the deck but nowhere else. >>:-(
I have heard of other modellers with the same problem, just one of their models just does not want to exist. <:(
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TomHugill

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Re: Success, failure rates
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2016, 11:02:30 am »

I've a tendency to start stuff and not finish it but I've never had a project I've given up on, might be setting my ambitions too low!
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Tugtower

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Re: Success, failure rates
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2016, 04:30:49 pm »

I don't measure a model as a failure when things don't go right with glues, paint work or other issues, i treat those as learning mistakes to which i plant more effort into resolving before doing my next.


I wouldn't down grade your efforts with some models regarding them as failures, look at them as the best of your ability's, not everyone is a highly skilled craftsman able to produce museum quality work. So by saying the model is a failure your only belittling your own efforts, in turn making your next project all that more daunting and the final result will be just as 'bad'.


They say ''you are your own worst critic'' and that's true but its all part of the learning curve, when i first started modeling i made all sorts of mistakes some of which looking back now i would blatantly lie i never built it!  :embarrassed:


That said if not for those mistakes i wouldn't have learnt anything to improve for the next, there is always a transition as you improve each model will always be better then your last and that's where you should be proud of yourself rather then being negative towards an imperfect model.


I'm a big one for not finishing projects in reasonable time ( i was up to 11 outstanding last year now i'm down to 9, with my oldest project being some 7 years in the process from a model that's already 60 years old !) ,some through lack of effort some from lack of enthusiasm is mostly the case on particular projects (those tend to be the ones that have fought to be built) , but they all get done slowly, i'm catching up now! to which i can only say life happens.


So in simple terms don't look at your models as failures be proud of your achievements to date and don't worry what everyone else thinks, I couldn't give a flying monkeys what anyone thinks of my builds, i had fun building them and thats ALL that matters!

ballastanksian

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Re: Success, failure rates
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2016, 08:08:29 pm »

My biggest failure is stopping and starting projects as things frustrate me or I get a bottle neck due to lack of materials. The M class destroyer languishes while I dabble with a restoration project, and HMS Rupert languishes while I spend money on another project. Ironically this is tecnically the replacement for one that I scrapped in 2009 when I moved and it had been allowed to deteriorate.

I am still learning many skills in model boating or have yet to try them, such as plank on frame or fibreglassing, so I am sure I will have a few mistakes to cringe over.

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