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Author Topic: The trials of modelling abroad  (Read 1136 times)

Brian60

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The trials of modelling abroad
« on: August 19, 2016, 01:58:26 PM »

Some of you will have followed my builds and complaints of building, in my case in Spain,  models abroad, from not having build materials on the 'doorstep' down to having parcels go mysteriously missing between the sender and arrival at the local post office.

The latest can be seen in the photo's. After locating a paint shop in travelling distance that does stock grp products (another story altogether) I purchased a couple weeks back some silicone free wax polish - it even said that on the can - Sin Silicona in the local lingo. With the weather being far too hot to actually lay up any grp I made do with polishing the mould several times.

This week the temperatures are cooling (back into the low 30's :embarrassed: ) I decided if I got up at 6am it gave me enough time to do a gel coat, leave it and then next morning do the actual lay up in the coolness of the morning, after 9am it definitely a no go. So this morning out with the spray gun and compressor and spray a mist coat of pva release agent onto the mould, go back 30 minutes later and spray a heavy coat, then leave alone to dry.

Anyway the photo's speak for themselves, can you say silicone in the wax polish? >:-o >>:-( You can see in one of the photo's where I have been washing off the release agent before getting going to remove the polish and silicone. I knew this was going to be a long build but I cannot catch a break whatsover.

nemesis

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Re: The trials of modelling abroad
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2016, 04:34:31 PM »

You can always use beeswax as a release, mix with REAL turpentine to the consistency you require. Very good standbye, used it for years. nemesis
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Brian60

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Re: The trials of modelling abroad
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2016, 04:47:27 PM »

That is what I have always used in the past Nemesis, as I said its so much easier to get stuff in the UK! I asked which wax they used in the paint shop, I was advised they used the stuff they gave me, so much for advice {-) Anyway its coming off and I do have a small amount of beeswax That I'll go over it with, Once i have wiped over with several rags and acetone, its just going to remove 20 euro's worth of surfacer with it, but at least I know why it was such a pain to get the plug out of the mould now.

nemesis

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Re: The trials of modelling abroad
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2016, 05:50:15 PM »

Sorry, I did not mean the beeswax that you buy in the shops,I get mine from the local beekeeper after he has got the honey. I clean and filter the grot and pour it into cake cases. After we changed the flooring at work I was left with a gallon of wax mansion polish, this I said was going to save me a fortune in release agent, I did learn a valuable lesson that day, what a mess.At least you found out before you laminated so really it was your lucky day. Good luck, nemesis
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John W E

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Re: The trials of modelling abroad
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2016, 06:17:28 PM »

Hi ya there Bill and Co :-)

As you have already learned Bill you do have to be extra careful when using any 'old' waxes for mould release - even bees wax, straight from the hive. 

Commercial mould release wax has an additive to it so that it doesn't melt under the temperatures of laminating and moulding.   I have seen one or two rather large moulds having to be destroyed  due to the fact that the wax and release agent was contaminated and didn't work properly.  We aren't talking about 10 here for a mould - we are talking somewhere in the region of say a couple of thousand pounds worth of moulds going down The Suwannee River.

Some laminating can build up quite a lot of heat - I have actually worked where we used to have to have a cooling system built into the mould - where water was pumped round to keep it cooled whilst it was curing. 

John
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Brian60

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Re: The trials of modelling abroad
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2016, 07:07:37 PM »

Yeah I reckoned you didn't get the commercial beeswax nemisis ;) mine was bought as solid blocks from a reputable tradesman who does antique furniture restoration in the UK. I've reclaimed half a block from a neighbour who wanted to wax a table he'd just bought, never thought I'd need it again after buying this tin of stuff!

I've seen some of that commercial stuff John, Discovery channel did a program not too long ago on a new minesweeper being built at I think Chatham. Massive mould that was chilled and the grp was sprayed on for speed.

Mine is small in comparison and for a one off that will be destroyed afterwards, this mould has about 120 in it. I could have gone for a  cheaper method of building :embarrassed: :embarrassed:
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