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Author Topic: Light switch  (Read 2096 times)

TheLongBuild

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Light switch
« on: October 27, 2016, 03:28:07 PM »


I am after one of the attached switches to operate some LEDS in a cupboard so when the door opens the lights come on..The sales people at wicks where I took this picture could not help !! . Not sure if it works on light or PIR type , any leads will be helpful.


Thanks
Larry

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Re: Light switch
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2016, 03:41:04 PM »

Looks like an infra red beam device.
A small mirror on the door would allow the beam
to return to the receiver until the door
is opened.


Ned

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Netleyned

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Re: Light switch
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2016, 03:44:45 PM »

Good old fashioned push to break
Switches when the door is closed
would be simpler
Aka fridge light switch.


Ned
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inertia

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Re: Light switch
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2016, 03:54:20 PM »

Larry
A simple microswitch would do the job, wired in series with the LEDs and power supply, with the COM and NC contacts used (so the circuit is broken when the door is closed). It works a treat on the magnetic alarm sensor of my workshop door, and small microswitches are as cheap as chips. http://www.componentshop.co.uk/v4-miniature-micro-switch.html
Dave M

I just Googled "Cupboard light switches" and found some really exotic devices - all costing silly amounts just for switching on cupboard lighting.
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TheLongBuild

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Re: Light switch
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2016, 07:05:44 PM »


Looks like an infra red beam device.
A small mirror on the door would allow the beam
to return to the receiver until the door
is opened.
Ned
No mirror, just the wood from the door.

malcolmfrary

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Re: Light switch
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2016, 07:10:00 PM »

Typing this while waiting for the picture to decide to load, but its file name "PIR2" suggests a passive infra red device. 
For switching on a cupboard light I can't think of a valid reason for using anything other than a simple switch.  Any electronic device monitoring the door position will be permanently drawing current, a simple switch only lets the current flow when the door opens.  The idea has worked on fridges since electric ones were invented.
Now that it has appeared, yes it has two lenses.  One transmits IR, the other receives the reflection off the door surface if its there.  Probably looking for a change in the received reflection.  As good a way of flattening batteries as any.  Switches are good for the same reason that wheels are round - they work.
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TheLongBuild

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Re: Light switch
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2016, 07:12:23 PM »



Larry
A simple microswitch would do the job, wired in series with the LEDs and power supply, with the COM and NC contacts used (so the circuit is broken when the door is closed). It works a treat on the magnetic alarm sensor of my workshop door, and small microswitches are as cheap as chips. http://www.componentshop.co.uk/v4-miniature-micro-switch.html
Dave M

I just Googled "Cupboard light switches" and found some really exotic devices - all costing silly amounts just for switching on cupboard lighting.


Probably will go for this option, but the doors are soft closing so not sure if they would activate the micro switch.


did have a laugh when we first looked at the walk in corner larder unit at wickes as at the time I asked how much they charged for 2  x 1 metre of waterproof leds would cost , the guy went away and came back and said 500., Did tell him tat I was not sure that was correct as I could get 5 metres of the stuff for 30

TheLongBuild

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Re: Light switch
« Reply #7 on: October 27, 2016, 07:14:39 PM »


Typing this while waiting for the picture to decide to load, but its file name "PIR2" suggests a passive infra red device. 
For switching on a cupboard light I can't think of a valid reason for using anything other than a simple switch.  Any electronic device monitoring the door position will be permanently drawing current, a simple switch only lets the current flow when the door opens.  The idea has worked on fridges since electric ones were invented.


pir2 was just my file name, possibly not the most accurate , just looked sleeker than other switches

malcolmfrary

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Re: Light switch
« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2016, 07:37:09 PM »

I am fairly sure than no matter how soft closing any door is, it will work any micro switch.  Some answering/recording machines had, as an end of loop sensor, a micro switch that was worked by the tape having a double thickness at that point. And that was with 1970's technology.  OK, as soon as possible, the move was made to a light bulb and a photocell, but the switches were sensitive enough to usually work at limits like that.  They are sensitive little thingys, but in cases like these will need provision for adjustment.


For battery powering low current intermittent things (hijack warning) I was just looking at a card of watch batteries and wondering what to do with the unwanted size ones like the AG12 and 13 ones.  There must be something that us modelers can do to usefully extract the energy from them before sending them to landfill.
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NFMike

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Re: Light switch
« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2016, 09:47:31 PM »

... before sending them to landfill.
You naughty boy  <*<

RAAArtyGunner

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Re: Light switch
« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2016, 10:41:34 PM »

My son recently installed leds on every shelf in the pantry.

Switching is by a simple "door" switch as used in motor cars.

Door shut lights off.
Door open lights on.

No need for infra red, sensors and the like, KISS is the way to go.
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