Model Boat Mayhem

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Author Topic: S.S. Nomad  (Read 1412 times)

GG

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S.S. Nomad
« on: December 06, 2016, 08:04:32 pm »

After a couple of models that needed to look smart for realism, something grubby seemed appropriate.  A freelance model based on a Tramp Steamer from the 1920/30's looked promising.  A well worn appearance as it eked out life serving small out of the way ports would be appropriate.  A scale of about 1/40-1/50 would produce a model some 34 inches (850mm) long which conveniently allowed the use of "O gauge" railway figures to crew it.
Using a "Unit" steam plant that had been lying idle under the workbench for far too long, seemed a good idea. A simple hull using pine planks for the main structure and plywood for the sides was quickly built.
To keep the performance up, the models beam was only just wide enough (4 inches - 100mm) to accommodate the steam plant.  This proved to be a serious mistake as the hull proved to be unstable even with external ballast.  Nothing for it but to scrap this model and build another with a wider beam.  Five inches (125mm) proved to be enough for the model to know which way up to float!
By now we were heading into winter and I really did not want to spend time messing with a steam plant at the cold (and probably wet too) lakeside.  Also, with small simple steam plants you are watching the time continuously to avoid running out of fuel or water.  The risk of the single cylinder engine stalling in the often debris covered I often have to sail in finally convinced me to use an electric motor.
The motor installed was a RE 540LN obtained from MFA (item no 719) which impressed me. Connected directly to a 45 mm diameter 3 bladed propeller, it drew less than 1 Amp yet propelled the model along at 2.5 Feet/sec (0.75 m/s).  This was a shade over a realistic top speed but handy when sailing with unobservant modellers!
With an operating weight of 9.5 pounds (4.3 kg) it's a steady sailing model and not readily pushed off course by wind or waves.  It's actually very comfortable to sail, you know where it is going to go and what it is going to do next.
The plans are now with the Editor of the Model Boats magazine, leaving me to enjoy this model making its grubby way across the water whilst puzzling out what to build next?
Glynn Guest+-
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dougal99

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Re: S.S. Nomad
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2016, 09:38:56 pm »

That I really like  :-))
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Sven

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Re: S.S. Nomad
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2016, 05:34:46 pm »

love it, even the shabby  look

Sven
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roycv

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Re: S.S. Nomad
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2017, 04:58:50 pm »

Hi all I see we are to have this model in the next (June 2017) Model Boats magazine, I am loooking forward to it.
Almost finished the North American ferry also to 'O' gauge scale.
I am still building this sort of model from the spare wood and bits and pieces in the shed.
regards Roy
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ballastanksian

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Re: S.S. Nomad
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2017, 10:35:08 pm »

Good oh, I will enjoy reading about this ship. I have fancied building a Tramp or Puffer.

Lovely grubby little model full of character Glynn  :-))
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