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Author Topic: The Art of Models Irene  (Read 30925 times)

hammer

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #175 on: July 07, 2017, 05:28:33 PM »

The boss slept most of the day so I went in shop. I will know when she is better, will get a lot of orders.
Started on the shrouds using builders line, some I had over from work 20 years ago, nice and supple.  Blackened with marker pen. Cut a slot in the felt pad, stretch the line rub up & down till black. As it weathers it turns the 51st shade of grey, looks effective. In the past I have twisted the line applied super glue, to represent a splice. Hit on a far better idea heat shrink, its a better representation as the splice would be wormed & served. (look it up Derek ). Both method seen in photo shrouds top. Thanks Kenny your idea good one. Fixing the dead eyes to the shrouds. Cut short lengths of tube brass or aluminium needs to be a tight fit on double shroud. So tight that it has to be pulled through. Thread tubes on wire, loop shroud & pull, photos start & pull.  I use a bent piano wire to give a constant distance for the lanyard, Crimp the tubes gently. Move piano wire to next. Only did the fore most on the mizzen trouble seen in wrong 1. Will have to remove sail shorten boom & replace fittings. Wrong 2 is not so bad in fact its good, Top sail gaff clue pulley on the wrong side of gaff. I have added another in correct place, will use the original for the ensign.
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derekwarner

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #176 on: July 07, 2017, 10:55:11 PM »

That's a pretty good looking set of threads there RGY O0....ever considered getting a job as a ships Rigger? <*<.....Derek

PS...

Assumed the worming had nothing to do with worms in oatmeal so have just found the following......I found this short documentary one of the better & is self explanatory...... thankyou  :P

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGP-ek3CLU8
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Derek Warner

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hammer

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #177 on: July 10, 2017, 02:45:09 PM »

Yes good video Derek, no rigging retired 20years. No workshop to speak of ether, boss getting better, no sneaking off duty now.   
Just a few things done earlier.   Top mast stay, spreader fitting.  Top mast purchase & vang deadeye with lashings painted (brass tube). Starboard vang 1 deadeye, Vang 2 portside deadeye. In the back ground is the ships boat gripes, brown sheering elastic. Holding the hatch cover in place. I had to fix the vang deadeyes as the forestays were sagging with weight of sails. Although the mast is fixed to keel & deck still a little movement.   
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ballastanksian

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #178 on: July 10, 2017, 08:56:01 PM »

She looks lovely. Your idea to use heat shrink is canny. I might get some for when I have to do some rigging on warships.

Keep up the good works (Nursing and building).
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hammer

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #179 on: July 11, 2017, 04:32:03 PM »

Thanks for the encouragement Crewkerne, gardening, cooking & cleaning.
Had a problem for some time, but cracked it now. I like to build as detailed as possible, still keeping a practical sail boat. My previous models have been larger than Irene. I was able to belay all the ropes properly coiled & looped. A lot of the ropes have a purchase at the bottom as well as multiple pulleys at the top. The answer a dummy block, rope comes down in top, out the side back in the same side, down to belay, back fix into side. Now it can be lengthened to reef the sail with out undoing. The dummy pin is a loop of wire pushed up through the rail, then doubled over so it can't come out.  A short end of rope is coiled & hooked over the top of the wire, disguising the wire. The top sails are no trouble all there lines belay on the mast. I can get at them removing the lot, sail & all. The jibs will fold down on to the bowsprit. When the lines are fixed I can complete the shrouds. Then test sail. Details will be added afterwards. Not that anchors, cat head & rat lines are details. 
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hammer

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #180 on: July 12, 2017, 03:20:06 PM »

Baggie rankles on the toping lift. Pipe cleaners, Half inch from the end burn off the fluff, untwist the wire & thread into the end of the cord, apply super glue. Paint a dirty brown. repeat on other end. 
Switches installed in the hatch, wires hooked out of the way of controls. 
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hammer

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #181 on: July 13, 2017, 05:07:07 PM »

How the rope is coiled just around a finger, loop over as shown. Leave a loop to go over pin, I then soak in watered down PVA, mould to shape let dry. If this is not done the rope will spring out & not look natural as it has no weight.The ropes belayed on the mast are just wound around the pins. The weight of the false coil will stop it unwinding. The mizzen mast is complete just the ensign to add after the launch. The smudge of brown on the mast is a spare hoop, for emergences. 
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Brian60

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #182 on: July 15, 2017, 09:50:13 AM »

I like the baggie's  on the topping lifts, I'll have to remember that tip for my next sailing vessel. Your way of making rope coils is the same as mine, make a loop pass and end through to form a second loop to locate on the pins, then soak in diluted pva.

She's coming on a treat mate, looking forward to it on the water.

hammer

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #183 on: July 15, 2017, 02:26:04 PM »

Thanks Brian great minds think alike so they say. 
Should be on the water soon, hopefully. After that a lot to complete the model. marking on the hull name, port, depth, and plimsoll line. Anchors ,chains, chain leads, Armstrong patent windlass and cat head. Mooring cleats and fair leads. Chimneys and exhaust pipes.  Life belts made once but lost somewhere in the shop. then there is general detritus like ladder, bucket, planks and rope laying about the deck, which will make the art of a model. See my trawler not documented online, but written up in Model Shipwright No 134.     
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hammer

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #184 on: July 19, 2017, 04:30:46 PM »

Every thing is conspiring against me getting ready to launch at the present. Very little time in the shop. Wife in hospital for tests she is radio-active at present, HELP. Never mind will get there soon.
I have completed all the sail lines, just the main shrouds to do. Using another method for the dummy blocks, simpler to make & can make them smaller. With a strip of wood the size for the blocks. Drill down the centre 1/4 inch, then drill across to connect to the bottom of the hole, & out other side. Cut off the block & round off the corners. Push the rope down the centre hole, with a wire that fills the cross hole push rope out the side. Take rope to belay & back up into the hole where the wire went, & glue, careful not the get glue on rope on other side of hole. Before starting a very small amount of super glue on the rope stops fraying but not to much or it won't bend into the cross hole.   
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Brian60

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #185 on: July 21, 2017, 10:23:04 AM »

I applaud your stamina for making the blocks, more than I ever bothered to do. I bought ready made ones, either with working brass sheaves or just plain wood. I like to build to scale but for me that was going to far and if they were a little over size or even under size, only I would know! These in the photo were sourced from modellingtimbers.

Hope your wife improves soon mate, but tell her if she wants irradiating, put her head in the microwave instead of the gas oven :D

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #186 on: July 21, 2017, 04:59:16 PM »

Thanks Brian, only radio-active for 24 hours, I suspect you know all about bone scans. 
As I have said before I enjoy the research, planning & building more than sailing. So making all I can that's why I avoid buying any thing that I can make myself.
Even making everything except glue, paint & motor ( did make gear box but not gears, could have but had stock) it has only taken me 7 months.  Out of which take 3 weeks holiday, a stay in hospital, nursing wife, bowls Wednesday & no weekend work. Sorry play.  {-) OK still some detail to add.
Rain & gales here & done me favour, had to stay in workshop. Irene is ready for the water just charge the batteries, night before. But with the weather forecast that will be Monday at best. 
The photo shows up the lettering but it is not that bad as the letters are only 2mm high.
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hammer

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #187 on: July 28, 2017, 04:13:16 PM »

The weather has not been good here, well not good enough for a maiden sail.  I removed the speed controller from another model, connected it up to Irene. Switching on nothing, tried the battery, flat, tried another that went flat as well. Found I had a short in the switch, Fitted a new one now have to charge the battery & hope the controller is not damaged.
To cheer my self I made the anchors.  The materials, strip of brass plate, brass rod, brass square & stay off a broken umbrella. Most of the shaping done with a file, plus 4 holes, 2 for the shank 1 for the stock 1 for chain. First I braze the shank to the crown, building up the brazing to thicken the arms & the bottom of the shank. Then silver solder on the top ( less heat ). Finally soft solder in the stock adding a ball of solder on the end. Fix on the chain & spray black, before it dries spray with red oxide from a distance. I will add brown later to create the appearance of rust. 
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hammer

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #188 on: July 28, 2017, 04:34:30 PM »

Parts of an anchor, as in my book. Save you looking it up Derek.
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derekwarner

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #189 on: July 28, 2017, 10:39:51 PM »

Thanks but that's OK...as I knew these  %).......

[although not wood worm, and not fluke worm....but certainly with an e]

So would the original have been iron or steel? [and created by a smithie <*<] or a combination of both?

Now if this is true, which part was steel?

Derek
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Derek Warner

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #190 on: July 29, 2017, 02:07:12 PM »

Derek I know you know, the font of all knowledge. I just had to put your name to get a response, as I know you are still watching. I have said before when I was at school they never had dislecsae or something like that. It was called stupidity & you where put at the back of the class, & forgotten. So thanks to spell checker. I can tell you most old anchors made of wrought iron, in the Black country area of England.  Some recovered are on display in Teignmouth, I will take a photo soon.
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derekwarner

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #191 on: July 29, 2017, 10:21:16 PM »

You must have very smart spell checkers in your neck of the woods if they have eyes to find a glitch .....stupidity ....well my Pa [Grandfather] taught me that stupidity is in the eye of the beholder.....& school.....no we were so poor we couldn't afford to go to school apart from the training in our voyage in the First Fleet from the Thames to Sydney Harbour

That training consisted not of mathematical or scientific lessons, but memorizing every word in the Oxford book of words 1878 version

Obviously the sketcher of your representation of the anchor should have spent more time reading the Oxford than lazing about and drawing 

No need for a photo for my benefit...we have plenty of old wrought iron relics here .....:kiss:.....

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Derek Warner

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #192 on: July 31, 2017, 04:41:26 PM »

You needn't look if you don't want. But I thought you would know why the metal looks like wood, after being in the sea for about a hundred years. Even I know its corrosion but why the irregular pattern. Ignore the things hanging on the anchor, supposed to be art.  {-)  So as I started at the beginning of this post, why is not model making an art.  :o 
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derekwarner

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #193 on: August 01, 2017, 02:51:11 AM »

I hope not too far off line from Irene........however we have a beautiful pair of Black Smithed [as in forged] 102 year old iron anchors in a small marine park for the Port of Kembla ....

Approximate sizing is Shank  = 12 ft, with the Crown = 6ft

They show the same [however much younger] appearance to that shown by RGY.......

We were taught that these wood like longitudinal corrosion marking is a direct result of the steam powered forged in   <*< fold marks in the iron....all relative to the manual rotation of the iron blank by the Smithies Mate

Today with our technology, forging is a far more scientific process over the older .....just heat & bash approach
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Derek Warner

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JimG

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #194 on: August 01, 2017, 12:16:53 PM »

From Wikipedia

Quote
Wrought iron is an iron alloy with a very low carbon (less than 0.08%) content in contrast to cast iron (2.1% to 4%). It is a semi-fused mass of iron with fibrous "xxxxx" inclusions (up to 2% by weight) which gives it a "grain" resembling wood, that is visible when it is etched or bent to the point of failure. Wrought iron is tough, malleable, ductile, corrosion-resistant and easily welded. Before the development of effective methods of steelmaking and the availability of large quantities of steel, wrought iron was the most common form of malleable iron. A wrought product is one that has been mechanically worked by forging, extruding, rolling, hammering, et cetera, to change its form and properties.

This gives it the wood look when rusted as the iron rusts away leaving the "xxxxx" inclusions.It is also why early iron ships such the Great Britain have survived so long through the use of wrought iron plates.

Jim
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hammer

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #195 on: August 02, 2017, 04:15:53 PM »

Thanks Jim, I have heard of XXX, my XXXXX must be strong stuff.
The weather is getting worse, so still unable to get Irene's bottom wet. I may even finish her before is happens. Not all bad as I can spend more time in the workshop. 
Working on the cat heads. Started with 1/4 + 1/8 mild steel. Cut to length & drilled holes, then shaped them with a file. One ready for paint.
Finally some shots of the deck as is.  The chimneys & exhaust ported tomorrow. 
 
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Brian60

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #196 on: August 02, 2017, 05:44:29 PM »

As she's nearly finished what do you have in mind for the next build? Personally as my current one is dragging on and on and on, I've started work on a simple pond yacht named 'June' (downloaded the plan from someplace) something a kid would be happy to shove around a lake, no r/c just set the sail and let it go.

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #197 on: August 02, 2017, 07:41:08 PM »

Thanks Jim, I have heard of XXX, my XXXXX must be strong stuff.


The forum filter doesn't like the word s l a g as produced by the smelting of iron ore.
To keep within the topic , good work here and looking better all the time.

Jim
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hammer

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #198 on: August 04, 2017, 10:37:48 AM »

Brian it is doubtful that I will be permitted to build another large model. The list, a footie, steam collier Crowpill 24", Irene 40", Glen Usk Paddler 60", Albatross sailing trawler 68", Hilda pilot cutter 68", and Duke of Devonshire paddler 72". I do have a Minnie traction engine to go no with. Also in photo is a old R.A.F. fire boat I was given, this would be good on the clubs present pond. Not big enough to be a lake.
  However still a lot of things to sort on Irene, past experience has shown better performance can be obtained without all the jibs set. Then there is all the bits lying about the deck, Shown in this interesting picture.  Including the ugly engine exhaust. The method used to make the tin on the top will be the way I make buckets. 
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hammer

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Re: The Art of Models Irene
« Reply #199 on: August 05, 2017, 09:49:36 AM »

Seeing battens on the stays instead of ratlines, I thought good. But I found the battens much more trouble than the rope.  I tried tying with cotton, drove me up the wall, kept moving. In the end I held them to the outer stays with modified clothes pegs. Putting a dab of super glue on the centre stays. Finally twisting fuse wire around all & painting black.   
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