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Author Topic: Spade connectors  (Read 4619 times)

Telstar

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Re: Spade connectors
« Reply #25 on: September 07, 2007, 01:16:17 PM »

Hi
One thing I would like to mention regarding crimp connections.
It is as important to use the correct size crimp for the wire/s used as it is to correctly crimp them.
The small crimps I used at work, were colour coded as was the crimp tool. To try to use a yellow (largest wire capacity) crimp on small (0.5 )cable wouldn't work. Also it is not good practice (although sometimes done) to cut strands off the wire to make it fit into smaller crimps.

Cheers Tom
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wombat

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Re: Spade connectors
« Reply #26 on: September 07, 2007, 01:19:54 PM »

Crimps properly made are as good if not better than soldered joints - hence their use in critical applications. To get a good crimped joint though, you need to make sure you have the right crimp tool for the job.

For spades and things, stick to the Red, BLue and Yellow tpye crimps with a suitable tool - ratchet is best, but I get good results with a plier type crimper  - the trick is to crimp until the handles are in the fully closed position. Other sorts of crimps - forget it without the right tool, which can cost a significant wedge (Last one I bought was 150.00)

However, if the wires are pulling out ofthe crimps - couple of reasons:

1/. The crimp was not made properly  - use the right tool and the right pressure
2/. You were trying to remove the connector by pulling on the cable - don't do it, whether the joint is crimped or soldered. It is actually better that you use a crimp if you are going to pull on the cable, because the failure mode is when you pull it. With a soldered joint you can get a degradation of the joint through stres that will bite you on the bum at the worst possible time.

A spade is designed as an anti-vibration connection - the hole in the spade itself mates with a pip onthe crimp part - this is designed to stop the male and female parts walking apart. You have to overcome the significant holding force to separate the connection. If you need to do it use pliers on the shoulder of the spade.

Remember though that spades are not designed to be separated repeatedly. I would be surprised if the rated life was much more than 5 or 10 disconnections. If you need a charging connection, it is best to provide a suitable connector so the spades can remain undisturbed. I use a 1/4" mono jack for charging the SLAs, which are mounted in the boat permanantly.. IAt the moment, they are set up so the jack socket  is wired striaght across the battery (tip positive) so you have to turn off the power to the rest of the boat before charging. Considering using a DPDT switch for the next one so it is pit into charge mode when the power is off

Wom
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malcolmfrary

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Re: Spade connectors
« Reply #27 on: September 07, 2007, 01:28:55 PM »

We do tend to use spade connectors out of spec as regards the number of connect/disconnect cycles.  When I remember, I usually secure the cable/connector join with heatshrink.  This forms a strain relief such that there is a gradual transition between rigid on the connector, and flexible in the rest of the world.
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madrob

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Re: Spade connectors
« Reply #28 on: September 12, 2007, 11:29:12 PM »

Has anybody got a pic of the ratchet type crimpers
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Telstar

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Re: Spade connectors
« Reply #29 on: September 12, 2007, 11:39:34 PM »

Hi This tool supplier shows typical ratchet type crimp tool



http://www.cromwell.co.uk/static/publication/374/pages/900.pdf

Cheers Tom
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