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Author Topic: Andy's Man Cave, part one.  (Read 2091 times)

dreadnought72

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Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« on: June 16, 2017, 12:21:19 AM »

I am, if all goes well, just under a year away from having a dedicated workshop of my own.

We've room down the side of the house for an extension about 8m long, though due to constraints it can only be 2.3m wide. Just under half of this length will be a utility room, but the Commander has given her approval for a 4.5m by 2m space (that's plaster-to-plaster) all for me. There'll be a door at each end (one external, one internal) and a single window on the external door end. I'm not worried too much about the window since I'm going to fill the space with lighting. And sockets. Lots of sockets.
[/size]I therefore humbly beseech the learned members of the forum to pitch in with whether this is viable as a good working area. It feels a wee bit 'skinny' and corridor-like, to be honest. Maybe a wheeled work bench is the answer? I anticipate some fixed bench space for vices, jig and bandsaw, but wonder how to most efficiently maximise my building space?Any advice and/or practical tips and photos would be much appreciated!Andy
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derekwarner

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2017, 03:31:07 AM »

...... "4.5m by 2m space (that's plaster-to-plaster)"....well it's certainly not huge Andy, but with some careful planning any Man Cave Space is better than none  :-))

How about you draw the floor plan to scale.......say 450mm long x 220mm wide, then cut 1/100 scale paper templates base plate sizes of your existing machinery and ideas of your bench size and relationship to the door access at either end of the room

You can then jiggle these cutout templates around to see the line of bests fit......

You don't mention the height of the room..........so all of the space above head height is potentially wasted.....you could consider a full length storage shelf for the full 4.5 M long x 600mm depth however attached to the wall commencing above head height or say 2.5M to ceiling........

Again with careful consideration, a similar sized elevated shelf could attached to the opposite wall

Short [600mm] lengths of 100mm diameter plastic water tubing also make great repositories for all sorts of timber planks

As you have noted, plenty of natural light or suspended fluro tube sets above your work [bench] area & P/P's

In a previous life, my workshop was about 4.5M long x 3M wide........and 3.5M high.....so I utilised that higher space for a floor to ceiling continuous 600mm deep shelf structure with the waist high bench level for small pillar drill, grinder & small table saw and this left room in the centre for a substantial wooden table as the main work bench

Good luck............ Derek
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tigertiger

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2017, 04:28:34 AM »

One thing I would definitely do (if access is not an issue) would be to put up a separating wall between the two ends. Utility room access from the house, workshop access from outside), for several good reasons.
Firstly, it would give you another wall for a deeper bench or machinery.
Secondly, if you are creating smells or dust, it would keep it out of the house, away from the laundry and avoid annoying SWMBO.
Additionally, it would keep the noise down, and give the utility end the same extra wall for shelves and storage.
If access is an issue, then putting up a wall with a door in it. A cheap external door, would provide a good seal between the two halves, and still provide a corner wall on both sides.



Workshop ideas have been discussed on Mayhem here http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,56788.msg590303.html#msg590303
My small workshop ideas and pics of my small shop are also on this thread, although I appreciate your workshop is narrower.

Loads of ideas for workbenches on Pintrest, you will need to register (free and no spam).
https://uk.pinterest.com/pin/336573772137967525/


Lots of ideas for folding workbenches.
https://uk.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=folding%20workbenches&rs=guide&term_meta[]=workbenches%7Ctyped&add_refine=folding%7Cguide%7Cword%7C4


With a space like that I would suggest a folding workbench, so that you can have more width when you need it. I would also supplement this with a work trolley, like a table on wheels, with storage underneath. Also the bench does not need to be full width, especially for modelling, 500mm might do it, with the work trolley for bigger jobs and where you need to work around the work piece.


Derek's thought about overhead storage is important. I have a low ceiling and I have shelves at above the deck, I am 1.72.
I have a 1.5 m deep, full width, shelf at one end of the garage for bulky storage of scraps. You could get your builder to put on in, if you lose the integral door.
There are also ides for overhead storage here https://uk.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=garage%20overhead%20storage&rs=guide&term_meta[]=overhead%7Ctyped&term_meta[]=storage%7Ctyped&add_refine=garage%7Cguide%7Cword%7C2

Put all of your electrics above bench height (1.1-1.2m) and have more outlets than you think that you need. You could even put a separate fuse/circuit breaker box in your shop. If you think your shop will be on wheels, put electrics on both walls. Consider an extractor fan, and a stand alone fan to pump air around the space.

Put as much as you can (benches, work tables, storage, etc.) on wheels. I have a single garage workshop and everything is on wheels except a paint cupboard.


I have a paint cupboard that I built that is only about 300mm deep. More than enough as anything deeper and you start to loose stuff. You may find a cheap bookcase with doors second hand.


I also have a lot of wall storage racks.
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tigertiger

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2017, 05:06:42 AM »

For the band saw.
Consider a flip top workbench. You could mount the band saw on one side and another machine on the flip side.
https://uk.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=flip%20workbench&rs=typed&term_meta[]=flip%7Ctyped&term_meta[]=workbench%7Ctyped
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dreadnought72

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2017, 12:53:39 PM »

Just to make it clear, there will be an internal wall between 'shop and utility rooms, and it will have to have a door in it - but as suggested this gives me at least a metre of "end wall" opposite the window and external door.


MANY thanks for the links to flip-top worktops: I'm liking those a lot. Pinterest wasn't on my radar when I asked the question last night, but I see it's a great source for ideas.


I think my overwhelming concern with "working in a corridor" is that I'd like to be able to move around the work - not just face it like we do with a computer's monitors, pretty much stuck in one place. I've used height-adjustable work surfaces before (great for comfort), and the idea of a mobile one - and perhaps a tilting top one, too - needs more investigation.


Thanks for the help so far. (At least no-one's said "2m ain't enough").


Andy



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Colin Bishop

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2017, 01:57:13 PM »

My workshop is just 1.9m x 3m. It was originally intended as a garden tool store on the end of the garage. I put in a false floor and insulation and it is now very snug. It has one door and two windows.The pics are a bit distorted due to the wide angle lens but give an indication of what you can pack in. It's a bit of a mess at the moment and needs tidying up.

The office chair on castors makes it easy to move around without getting up and there is room for most general modelling work. I do any spraying or heavier work either in the garage or under the carport using a workmate.

Colin

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ballastanksian

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2017, 09:03:59 PM »

For my model engineer club I drew a scale floor plan with 'blocks' representing machine tools and furniture for when we were working out how much room we would need in our 'work store' extension. It was incredibly informative.

Put in as many drawers as you can. I aspire to do this because then you are not piling things on top of each other resulting in occasional and possibly costly avalanches of stuff falling out when you open a cupboard door or lift something off a shelf . You can also have 'Use specific' drawers, say one for iron mongery and another for machine tool sundries such as sanding discs or blades etc. Keep an area free on the wall to put your master plan on, and perhaps make a section of your work bench so it can be sloped up to create a drawing board/ plans layout to ease any marking up or plans modification.

Make space for a workshop vac or extraction fan to remove dust and fumes. A friend of mine installed foot and work top level openings linked to a workshop vacuum to suck up dust etc from the floor and top without faffing with dustpans and bins. What machine tools have you got? Machine tools can be put on pivoting beds attached to the bench so you can hinge a band saw out to be able to cut long items. Any movable benches/ tool stands should be solid and if possible have castors with excellent brakes so you don't kangaroo down the workshop when boshing something.

I did a quick sketch or two myself and found that if you had 2x two metre benches at one end, you could have a 2x1 metre movable bench in the other end.

Keep us informed of progress in the future as this will be interesting:O)

Perhaps another avenue to consider is what you intend to build? I know we have all deviated from any lists of what we would like to build before we get too decrepit, but if you have one, are any potential projects as long as or longer than 2 metres?
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dreadnought72

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2017, 01:00:27 AM »

Oo! Colin, can I move the entire insides of your workshop to mine?!  ok2

Ballastanksian...drawer units - yes. I'm liking the look of castored tool drawer units. This sort of thing. The ability to move most of the contents of a workshop around appeals in terms of making space, keeping it clean, and not faffing about for access while working, especially when the space is tight. And the idea for above-head storage for wood and long materials is excellent. I will NOT be putting a PC in there: too much distraction. A radio and perhaps a small beer fridge is plenty.  :-))

I'm on an amateur astronomy forum where some of the best threads have been about building home observatories. My light pollution is so bad that that's pointless for me, but there have been some fascinating reads where you see people go from 'cutting turf' to 'first light' while confronting all the issues that crop up.

For the extension, things will start next year: I turn 55 in February and can then dip, tax-free, into my pension. My spreadsheets say this is affordable, and I'd like nothing better to be in a position where I have the time, money and dedicated space to finish off a couple of projects and set-to on new ones towards my eventual retirement. If there's interest I'll document the build and fitting of my cave when it all kicks off.

Size of future projects?

Big.

Andy
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ballastanksian

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2017, 06:52:52 PM »

I am thinking of movability of hulls in your workshop without having to walk them outside, turn them around and then walk back in with them!

Any hull over two metres long might dig holes in your walls or catch on shelves  :((

The beer fridge sounds like a splendid idea:O)
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tigertiger

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2017, 10:51:51 AM »

If your work bench is on wheels, you can just shove it over to the other side of the shop to work on the models other side; without the need to turn it around. A small additional work table/trolley, for glue, tools, and other pieces you are working on, makes 'flipping' the workshop easy. I have a very heavy bench on 4 inch swiveling/locking wheels. I have never had to lock more than 2 wheels to stop it wandering.


BTW, industrial wheels are sometimes color coded for hardness (white/red/black), hard wheels slip more easily, and are more likely to damage a soft floor covering or wooden floor. I have 4 inch red ones, I think they are rated at 75kg each, and they do not mark my soft vinyl non slip floor cover. I have used the 1 inch white ones and almost ripped the floor as they were digging in.
Other furniture casters also vary in hardness and weight ratings. Worth doing a little checking, as you can get better casters fit for purpose and still save money. Cheap furniture casters will let you down, industrial casters cost more, but are still cheaper than good furniture casters. You can also get extra wide wheels for really heavy stuff. I have got 3 inch dia, 1.5 inch wide wheels for some heavy racking on bamboo laminate flooring.
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dreadnought72

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2018, 09:12:34 PM »

Man Cave, part two.

As I hurtle towards getting the groundwork started, discussion, re-drawing and general fiddling about of plans suggest the internal dimensions of my future boatcave is now stabilising at 4.1m by 1.7m. (That's about 13'6" by 5'6") The length is great, but it's a bit tighter than I originally thought - I'll be able to touch the opposite walls at the same time - but it's ok, I guess, compared to the kitchen table. Current thoughts:
  • A foldable 2' wide main work surface of 8' in length against one long wall. I like working standing up - I do it all the time in the kitchen - but the height of this surface MUST be better suited to my height rather than a general kitchen worktop height. (Blame Christine Frederick*, an early pioneer of 'efficient kitchens' in the late 20s. She decided on ~36" for the height of all kitchen worktops simply 'cos the people she measured at the time were all around 5'5". Soon after, appliance manufacturers followed suit in a rush to standardisation in order to fit her findings. Now I'm 5'11", and I find current kitchen worktops too low for protracted use: I'll aim for around 39" height for this main workbench. ...42" is standard 'bar' height! :)
  • Stored under this will be the movable workbench, perhaps 5' long, 2' wide and 29" high. It'll be castored/lockable so I can move it around and set it in place, and this will be something I can whizz around in a wheeled chair.
  • One (short) end wall will accommodate a lathe, for use standing up.
  • The free space alongside the main work surface wall at the opposite end to the lathe will have room to accommodate a bench grinder, pillar drill, drum sander, fretsaw, as required. Door in this short wall.
  • Multiple shelves above everything.
  • Wheeled drawer cabinet for other tools.
  • Enormous amount of lighting and sockets.
  • Ability to access the floor (lino?) throughout for cleaning.

Andy

* Incidentally, she's also part-responsible for "planned obsolescence". The desire to have household goods keel over after a few years in order that we might buy new ones. Her thinking was this would promote consumerism and support the manufacturing economy. :( I prefer good engineering in the first place. :)
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tigertiger

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2018, 03:54:16 PM »

PM sent
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Mark T

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2018, 07:04:07 PM »

Hi Andy it all sounds good. I did away with all of my shelves as when I was sanding etc they just collected so much mess. I put all of my bits and peices away now but Iím probably on my own on that one  {-)
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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2018, 12:47:38 PM »

You could use a cheapo roller blind to drop down in front of the shelves, plus it can double up as a plan/drawing holder......saves takingup a lot of wall space.
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tigertiger

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Re: Andy's Man Cave, part one.
« Reply #14 on: March 16, 2018, 01:07:42 PM »

To anyone with a dust problem, a shop vac is cheap enough and a down-draught table is fairly easy to make. I do a lot of sanding on a down-draught table and have no problem with dust. It is also fairly easy to make your own cyclone dust extractor to run your shop vac through. All the larger particles of dust just falls in the bucket then. I have seen a lot of home woodworking shops with DIY cyclones. There is a lot of stuff on Youtube about dust extraction for home workshops.


Also, if there is that much dust in the air, think about your lungs. I am not being a snowflake here, several of our members are suffering from the effects of past exposure to dust.
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