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Author Topic: TurboCAD  (Read 742 times)

SJG001

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TurboCAD
« on: September 04, 2018, 10:08:00 PM »

I am planing on using a 3d printer to do some modelling work and design - (Anycubic i3 Mega seems to be the front-runner at the moment)


I used to use AutoCAD regularly at work when I was a designer and trained people to use AutoCAD.


I am now looking at CAD packages and the one that fill the requirement closest is TurboCAD (Not wanting to spend X000/year on a AutoCAD License)


Is there any comments good/bad about TurboCAD ? - any view would be appreciated.
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grendel

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Re: TurboCAD
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2018, 05:11:14 AM »

get an educational version of AutoCAD, you can sign up as an educator (who teaches people how to use autoCAD, it does have the 'educational stamp - but that doesnt transfer across to the stl model.

https://www.autodesk.com/education/free-software/autocad
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SJG001

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Re: TurboCAD
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2018, 12:46:29 PM »

get an educational version of AutoCAD, you can sign up as an educator (who teaches people how to use autoCAD, it does have the 'educational stamp - but that doesnt transfer across to the stl model.

https://www.autodesk.com/education/free-software/autocad


Thanks - Had considered that as an option but rejected it
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grendel

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Re: TurboCAD
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2018, 03:56:11 PM »

I have had an educational copy for about 10 years now, renewing the version every time a new one comes out - but then I do still train people at work in AutoCAD.
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ddmckee54

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Re: TurboCAD
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2018, 09:17:31 PM »

For 3D:
Fusion from Autodesk is currently free for hobbyists and would be my recommendation.  I think you've got to register every year but don't remember.
Designspark 3D is also free software, but not it's not as powerful as Fusion - trust me on this.  I use Designspark for the simple reason that it was the best fit for me at the time.  (It felt like the easiest transition for me from 2D AutoCAD but I hadn't looked at Fusion yet.)  I keep threatening to dedicate some time to learn Fusion and quit using Designspark but haven't gotten a round tuit yet.  Once you've got something that works for you it's hard to justify spending the time to change to something else.

For 2D:
I use Draftsight at home.  It's a freebie AutoCAD sorta clone.  I've heard that some programmers left Autodesk and started this software but can neither confirm nor deny that rumor.  This software you also have to register every year.  Like I said it's an AutoCAD sorta clone.  It's not an exact copy, but if you can find your way around in AutoCAD then you can make this work without too much trouble.

Don
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RST

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Re: TurboCAD
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2018, 10:18:54 PM »

As someone with 30 years experience in Autodesk 2D I'm really struggling to make a transition to 3D modelling.  I've not tried for a few months again but I just gave-up on turbocad.  I found fusuion somewhat more intuative from the outset though -process still a bit painfull but I'll try again.  Biggest thing for me is autocad is always typing the commands with left hand and drawing with the right.  Nothing makes sense in 3D, or drawing me away from text commands.
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bfgstew

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Re: TurboCAD
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2018, 10:39:02 PM »

I found AutoCad to be fairly easy to go from 2D to 3D, I use the term 'fairly', loosely.
With no training or experience though it was all self taught and watching YouTube tutorials. As for typing commands, I can count the fingers on one hand how many commands I type. Once you can navigate 'all' the command bars and menu ribbons it is easyish. All that aside, the power of modern CAD software, once mastered can be astonishing as it can be transfered to printers and plotters, cnc, lasers and 3D printers.
Just wish I had a bigger monitor to work with, 24" screen can't cut it now, may have to link up to the 55" tv screen now my lad has moved out to Uni........ %)
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RST

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Re: TurboCAD
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2018, 11:43:35 PM »

I found AutoCad to be fairly easy to go from 2D to 3D, I use the term 'fairly', loosely.
With no training or experience though it was all self taught and watching YouTube tutorials. As for typing commands, I can count the fingers on one hand how many commands I type. Once you can navigate 'all' the command bars and menu ribbons it is easyish. All that aside, the power of modern CAD software, once mastered can be astonishing as it can be transfered to printers and plotters, cnc, lasers and 3D printers.
Just wish I had a bigger monitor to work with, 24" screen can't cut it now, may have to link up to the 55" tv screen now my lad has moved out to Uni........ %)

...just wished I hadnt learned certain parts of autocad best part of 30 years ago now!!!
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grendel

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Re: TurboCAD
« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2018, 07:45:32 AM »

as a daily autocad user I struggled with 3d in autocad - I think that this is because the 3d in autocad isnt real 3d, you work in 2d and keep rotating the model to get your axis correct for the command you want to carry out.
For 3d work I still prefer Bentley microstation, where you can just input your coordinates.

autocad, as an old school user, I use a combination of typed commands, toolpalettes and the ribbon, whichever is most convenient at the time.
The problem I do have with all of the other cad derivatives and 3d software is the lack of functionality, I know what I want to do, but the tools arent there to do it. so I have been spoilt by 30 years of CAD, I know what can be done in full CAD and expect it from the other software.
but to summarise - if you want to do 3D in autocad - learn how to rotate your ucs to get things in the correct plane to do the work.
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SWEnick

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Re: TurboCAD
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2018, 08:55:46 AM »

Good morning!


I guess I am on the other side of the spectrum. Being born in the early eighties I only got to watch my father use the 2D Auto CAD. I can still remember that giant table top keyboard with all the functions on it. Some of you probably know what I am talking about.


My first experience with CAD software was in University where I was introduced to Autodesk Inventor 2005 and as a mechanical engineer I have had the privilege to try several of the more widely used software. CREO, Wildfire, Inventor and Solidworks.
They all do the same thing basically, but go about it differently.


Unfortunately for a home user these are out if reach for most people. Crazy expensive, however, with the introduction of desktop 3D printers for next to nothing I believe we will be seeing more 3D CAD  and CAM software available with the home user in mind. Autodesk's "Fusion360" is a big step in that direction. So is Google's "Sketchup". And more are on their way.


For my submarine project I will be using my 3D printer for the whole build. Hull, planes, end caps and pump housings. Everything will be 3D printed with different types of materials with weight saving and strength in mind. At the moment I am using Solidworks through a virtual computer from home.


Nick
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markymar93

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Re: TurboCAD
« Reply #10 on: October 24, 2018, 06:07:32 PM »

Hi
I use Turbocad for work, to prepare 2D plans.  I was trained in Autocad, however, i found Turbocad a very straight forward package to use and have ended up sticking with it (been using it now for about 10 years).  I have done a little 3D in Turbocad and i understand it can be very effective, however, i do not have a lot of experience in 3D. 
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SJG001

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Re: TurboCAD
« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2018, 07:06:49 PM »

Many thanks markymar93 - I have tried a few of the packages recommended here and elsewhere - TurboCAD seems closest to what I need/want.



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markymar93

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Re: TurboCAD
« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2018, 09:43:25 PM »

it is a good package. the 3d does seem fairly straightforward with it in part. i have the pro version but will be getting the latest package soon.
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