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Author Topic: Building a Workshop  (Read 3543 times)

derekwarner

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #25 on: September 25, 2018, 10:32:45 pm »

The general lighting looks good Andy.....you may need a small incandescent light directly on a lathe or mill if you have them.....Derek
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Derek Warner

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Perkasaman2

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #26 on: September 25, 2018, 11:56:03 pm »

 :-))
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dreadnought72

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #27 on: September 26, 2018, 12:04:04 am »

I will get a couple of anglepoise-types for close work. There are some cracking LED-bulb ones that can be wall (vertically) mounted and are super-flexible. Very tempting.

Workbenches in first, though  ... I need to see what's required, and whether they can be wall-fixed or surface-movable.

Andy

Sorry - a re-read might mean you'd suggest incandescent bulbs to avoid flicker effects? 
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dreadnought72

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #28 on: September 27, 2018, 09:20:18 pm »

My glass order ("6mm toughened, four this size, and one that size") was put in a week ago to a local firm. They said "seven days" so I popped in on the off-chance earlier this morning.


I was immediately asked for Friday's lottery numbers! - my glass had arrived literally a minute earlier, and they'd just been about to phone me.  :-))


Later I table-sawed up some quality oak as battening (9mm by 15mm) and got through the best part of 30 metres for the five windows. Used about 200 nails to fit them in.


All done. The glass cutting was impeccable - the sizes just right.


Tomorrow? I start framing up the workbench supports out of pine stock and leftover timber from the end walls I haven't needed, and - now I'm completely weatherproof - may get a chance to start on the floor. Photos, of course, to follow.


The bill so far? This might be useful info...

2 tonnes concrete 120
2 Sheds            550
Guttering           50
Insulation          40
Ply Lining        190
Electrics          180
Fixings & Fillers   60
Glass              140
Oak                 20
Pine Stock          15
Paints              40

Total so far      1405 - and maybe 80 hours work over two weeks.
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nemesis

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #29 on: September 27, 2018, 09:57:14 pm »

Just a little tip I learned years ago. Do not have windows in your shed. One reason is obvious and the other is you lose a wall for shelving. nemesis
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dreadnought72

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #30 on: September 27, 2018, 10:34:22 pm »

I get that, Nemesis, but at 5' across, I want the additional light, and added shelving would cut into my workspace just too much.  :-))


Andy
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tigertiger

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #31 on: September 28, 2018, 03:46:10 am »

A couple of things spring to mind.
There is space above the window for a small shelf, even allowing for the slope of the roof. It does not have to be deep, as even a 6" shelf will safely support a 9" box, and you can tip it as it comes out to avoid the ceiling.


Benches you could consider. There are lots of plans for fold down benches attached to the wall that would only steal 2" from your floor area. Perhaps not for the main bench, but for auxiliary benches it is an option. There are loads of free plans online. A variation would be a bench that folds up flat against the glass to stop nosey people casually looking into the shop.
I assume you will be making your own benches. I always recommend in a small shop that everything is on wheels. I have a very heavy bench on 3" locking wheels that is great for cabinet making. It is only 2 foot deep, but if I need extra depth I can pull it out from the wall and lock the wheels.
You could also consider making benches on wheels under the window that are short enough to be rotated and place against the end wall. This would give you flexibility, and making cleaning up a doddle. The only thing to consider is if you were going to have a wall cabinet, on the end, it needs to be above bench height.
Depending on your headroom, you could also raise the floor to give you underfloor storage for infrequently used items.
The ceiling is also an ideal storage space for pipes and long timbers, but you have probably already thought of that.


For the windows, you can buy the opaque window films that will stop people looking in, but do not reduce light. The stuff I got is plastic, you spay a little water on to the glass and just roll on films and smooth it wish a squeegee, you can also re-position it if not straight. Mine has been on for maybe 5 years now, and is just peeling away a tiny bit at the corners.
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Brian60

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #32 on: September 28, 2018, 08:50:04 am »

Problem with wooden structures is that they are too easy to break into. Many years ago I came home from work to find they had carefully cut around (with a padsaw type blade?) both the padlock hasps and removed them from the wall then prised open the mortice lock and stolen all my power tools.
I got it all repaired and the insurance paid out for the power tools. Six months later they came back and removed the shiplap from the rear of the shed and my tools had gone again - this time bypassing the door alarm I had installed! The police said this is a normal modus operandi, they know you will get stuff replaced, so they give 6 months or so and then target you again. The insurance would only pay out if I replaced the timber structure with either brick or concrete cast.
Just a point to bear in mind. Otherwise your shed is looking like its going to be a real mancave.

dreadnought72

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #33 on: September 30, 2018, 06:40:51 pm »

Benches and filler applied, along with laminate flooring. Tomorrow? Painting.





...and then tidying up. :(


Andy
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Perkasaman2

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #34 on: October 01, 2018, 01:00:50 am »

Well done. You are making fast progress and your shed is superb.
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dreadnought72

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #35 on: October 01, 2018, 01:49:26 am »

Thank you! (Busting a gut here - and pulling left-shoulder nerves, too - to get this done asap!)


Andy
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tigertiger

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #36 on: October 01, 2018, 02:45:58 am »

Looking good. Those interlocking gym floor mats are excellent in a workshop. I have two together in front of my bench and I can move them around the shop as needed, Clumsy as I am, I never trip over them, unlike some of the other mats I have used. If I didn't have heavy stuff to cart around, I would use them for the whole shop floor.
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Brian60

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #37 on: October 04, 2018, 02:59:38 pm »

Well after a bit of a tidy up this is all the space I need nowadays - gone are the days when I had a full shed to myself, now I get a corner of the room my wife uses for 'arty' stuff. Although big tools like the bandsaw, drill press etc are still in an outside store room, but I don't really work in there.
Table top needs a new cutting mat here but thats all, the room has been tidied around so that new central heating rads can be installed.

dreadnought72

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #38 on: October 24, 2018, 10:42:04 pm »

Nearly there!


The building end:


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dreadnought72

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #39 on: October 24, 2018, 10:44:19 pm »

The messy end!  :embarrassed:


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Capt Podge

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Re: Building a Workshop
« Reply #40 on: October 24, 2018, 11:27:32 pm »

Looking really good Andy - and practical to boot  O0 .
Also well planned and executed  :-))
... Good on yer.


Regards
Ray

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