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Author Topic: Near MissStrange  (Read 1183 times)

jaymac

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Near MissStrange
« on: July 28, 2019, 07:13:25 pm »

Unexpected effect with super glue  the laces in all my walking boots are the thick type  which is a kind of cord covered by a sort of elastic/canvas sheath. This  sheath often breaks and  contracts exposing  an inch or so of cord which dont like the metal lace guides.  I thought to maybe feed the sheath back down and super glue to the cord . As I put the first  drop on the cord  I thought  I saw a wisp of smoke  waited then applied some more sure enough it was smoke and boy did the fumes bite.Thought I was doing my  Masks off in a gas training again :o  where you learn holding you breath makes no difference
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raflaunches

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Re: Near MissStrange
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2019, 07:19:31 pm »

Iíve had a similar experience with certain fabrics and I too thought I imagined the smoke, silk can be rather nasty too as can denim! :o
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unbuiltnautilus

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Re: Near MissStrange
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2019, 08:01:26 pm »

The more porous the material is, the more likely this is to happen. Balsa wood, tissue paper and fabric commonly cause cyanos to kick off like this. Yes, avoid the vapours, pretty potent!
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RST

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Re: Near MissStrange
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2019, 09:07:51 pm »

Go into the garden, take a face tissue / cpl. of bits of toilet tissue -better still a cotton bud.  Pour on a dod of thin CA and stand back!


CA reacts with moisture, if you have something really "wooly" the surface area is immense and it wicks the moisture out of the air and generates allot of heat and fumes off.  I've had it on cotton jeans and boilersuits also!

Cotton jeans and thin CA particularly potent in my experience and can even start smouldering!

...my first experience of this was in the 80's with probably my first bottle of superglue and a shellsuit I begged my folks to buy me.  I hurt allot worse after my parents found out the tracsuit was trashed.

...I do like building with balsa and thin CA though.  I would never use balsa cement or PVA with it again!



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Colin Bishop

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Re: Near MissStrange
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2019, 09:18:37 pm »

Aliphatic or Superphatic glues beat cyano hands down for wood joints.
Colin
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RST

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Re: Near MissStrange
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2019, 09:28:43 pm »

Tell that to the guys who fitted my kitchen LoL!




....though I do tend to agree "titebond" or "super phatic" -about the only deluxe material I rate is rather good stuff.
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malcolmfrary

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Re: Near MissStrange
« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2019, 10:35:27 am »

Beware of large surface areas presented by fibres, and stuff like cotton wool. 
More insidious than cyano, but equally tricky because of that, is oil based paint on cleaning cloths.  The paint cures by oxidising slowly.  This is heat generating, usually slow enough to not be a problem.  But give it a little help (e.g. scrunched up cloth in sunlight with not much airflow to cool it) and it can warm up to its flash point, when it will "spontaneously" combust.  Fortunately not likely with the quantities that modellers generally use.


Anybody remember the "Supermodels" series?  The one where they were glueing foam wings using PVA?  And using a "quick dab" of superglue to kick it off fast?  From memory, that looked like a plentiful source of fumes.
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