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Author Topic: Lighting  (Read 329 times)

warspite

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Lighting
« on: February 11, 2020, 12:52:28 PM »

I am considering replacing the fluorescent tubes in my fittings with LED types, but for what its worth based on the mentioning of the ballasts contained within the existing units, would it be better to replace the whole unit(s), I don't like throwing away serviceable units when it could just be a bulb change - discuss  :embarrassed:
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Stan

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Re: Lighting
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2020, 01:10:22 PM »

Simple answer It would be wise to check with local electrical wholesalers after all its only simple call or visit could save lot hassle.


Stan. :((
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Colin Bishop

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Re: Lighting
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2020, 01:44:36 PM »

I had this issue with the lighting in my garage and workshop. Messing around with the ballast is not always straightforward depending on the fitting you have plus you will get a better result by simply replacing the whole fitting and there is a big choice of lengths and colour temperatures at good prices these days. Just google LED batten fittings. I now have much more light with a better colour rendering (daylight) and they cost a lot less to run. No flickering either.
Some batten fittings have two tubes for more light - check the lumen count.

Just one thing to bear in mind is that the LED batten fittings are usually end feed whilst traditional fluorescents tend to have the cable entry at the centre. This can entail extending your wiring although with some batten fittings you can modify them to run a cable back inside the casing if you know what you are doing.

Colin
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Stan

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Re: Lighting
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2020, 03:12:27 PM »

To be honest these types of light fittings in the not to distance future be obsolete so bite the bullet and replace with a L E D fitting,


Stan.
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Umi_Ryuzuki

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Re: Lighting
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2020, 09:11:21 PM »

I installed new 1200mm led lamps into the existing fixtures.
Some people said that this doesn't work, but the bulbs I purchased were advertised as 
able to work in existing fixtures with ballasts. Others I talked to said that the ballasts are only 
in place to get the old flourescent bulbs started, and they would switch off after illuminating the bulbs. 
 
So I have replaced four of the flourescent bulbs in two fixtures with no issues.

 :-)

Colin Bishop

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Re: Lighting
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2020, 09:22:36 PM »

The LED battens tend to be neater though.

Also, not sure if US fittings are the same as European ones. Your mains voltage is 110 as opposed to 230 over here.

It is certainly possible to substitute LED for fluorescent tubes, whether it is worth it is another issue!

Colin
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tigertiger

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Re: Lighting
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2020, 03:04:05 AM »

I can only see one possible downside to switching to LED strips. That is if you have a narrow workshop, and wall mounted lights.
As the LED strip is slimmer than the fluorescent tube strip, if you have any wall mounted shelves below the light fitting, these will cast a longer shadow.
Fixes for this problem include: mounting the LED strip on a wooden batten to create distance from the wall, or moving the LED strips to an overhead position (about 500 mm from the wall is about right for normal height ceilings).
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warspite

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Re: Lighting
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2020, 08:04:04 AM »

In answer to Tigertiger, there are two types of fittings, the one the thread is about where the batten is similar to those seen in a kitchen or a premises where the tube is mounted in a batten, when it starts to flicker you either replace the tube or the little capacitor starter, there is the other type - a rubber flexible strip with multiple led's interconnected, both are good for saving electricity and yes the multiple strips are better for localised lighting because they illuminate close to the surface, the batten type are sometimes used to illuminate worktops by placing them under the wall cupboards and are usually about 200-300 mm long, we use the rubber flexible strip type for under ours attached to the pelmet.


I have two old batten types in the loft / workshop, a 4 ft (1200 mm) and a 5 ft (1500 mm), both are the old tube type the 4 ft one is a 36w T8, no idea what the other is, it's that old, so the general concensus at the moment is I could convert the tubes only or replace the whole units, I would prefer to just change the tubes and upcycle the fittings (the more ethical choice rather than throwing the fittings into the recycling stream). Discussion to continue?.
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tigertiger

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Re: Lighting
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2020, 04:06:51 PM »

I did understand  :-)) . I was pointing out the only possible problem I could invisage.
I was talking about LED light bars, which are similar to flouro battens. They are used a lot here, both as ceiling lights in offices and mounted on walls. Perhaps they are not readily available in the UK yet. I was simply pointing out a problem someone might have IF they have a wall mounted batten flouro and replace it with a light bar, to utilize existing wiring. It might sound odd to put a light on the wall, but I have seen it a couple of times where headroom is a problem. Once in a DIY loft conversion, and also in a low basement. And yes it does make sense to have lights under cupboards, but not everyone gets around to that.
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warspite

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Re: Lighting
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2020, 04:33:23 PM »

Sorry, didn't mean to infer you not understanding the batten type, the written word can be misinterpreted as much as the spoken word, and I know what you mean about the fitting under cupboards, our original ones were the fluorescent gas type and were hardly if ever used, and even now it seems I am the only who uses the current ones - go figure, when its swimbo who insists we have them
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Operational - 1/72 LCMIII, 1/180 Royal Sovereign
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