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Author Topic: Motor Mounting Part 1  (Read 264 times)

GG

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Motor Mounting Part 1
« on: November 30, 2019, 03:14:25 PM »

Mulling over the installation of motors in a new model and it suddenly occurred to me that my methods of securing the motor into a hull have developed in various ways over the years.


At first the common method of using a motor which was fitted with a mounting bracket was always employed, Fig 1.  Some degree of packing under the motor mount was usually needed to get both motor and propeller shafts properly aligned, after which the mount could be firmly screwed down.


Sometimes a motor had to be used which was not supplied with a mounting bracket.  This entailed either fabricating my own bracket (usually from aluminium sheet) or buying (if available that is) a commercial bracket. 


Glynn Guest
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GG

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Re: Motor Mounting Part 2
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2019, 03:31:44 PM »

Partly because a commercial motor bracket either could not be obtained or was not suitable for the installation, another method was used.  This was to fit the motor between two blocks of wood glued to the hull bottom and secure it in place with a strap (usually aluminium again) shaped to fit over the top of the motor, Fig 2.  Again, packing might be needed under the motor to get it to the correct position to align with the propeller shaft.


An even simpler way was then used with the blocks either side being extended upwards to be level with the top of the motor.  This time a flat plate could be used to hold the motor in place, Fig 3.


One problem with both methods was that could be hard to stop the motor rotating due to Torque reaction.  This can be a serious problem for modellers who use violent applications of motor power via the throttle sticks.  A motors rotation can be stopped by placing some high friction material (thin rubber sheet works well) between the motor case and the strap/plate.


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GG

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Re: Motor Mounting Part 3
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2019, 03:42:27 PM »

A variant on the previous methods was to secure the motor between the two blocks by using elastic bands looped over the motor and fitted between pegs in the blocks, Fig 4.


This may be one of the easiest way to hold a motor in a model and yet still allow quick and easy removal.  It is however not really suitable for high power motors but seems to be more than adequate for the RE 385 and lower power 500 types like the "rock crawlers".


The elastic bands can perish in time so a regular pre-sailing check is advisable.  Using suitable "O rings" might be better...?


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GG

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Re: Motor Mounting Part 4
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2019, 03:59:17 PM »

A method that some might think is a shade too permanent is to simply "stick" the motor into the hull, Fig 5.  Again some packing is usually needed to get the motor and propeller shafts aligned.


As for the "glue", I agree that an adhesive like epoxy is a rather risky since in event of the motor needing to be replaced, then serious damage to the model is likely.  However, using something like Silicone sealant on clean surfaces can produce a firm bond to hold the motor in place yet still allow its removal with careful cutting and modest force.  A latex based adhesive has also been used successfully.


A recent model used one of those "sticks everything" tubes of adhesive (actually called "STIXALL" too!) to great effect.  The bond was more than strong enough but I could still remove the motors without ruining the model.  This method was also used in a small destroyer model with twin motors where there was no room for any other way of securing the motors side by side, Fig 6.


Yes, all these methods of mount the motor have been illustrated with figures based on a hull with a flat bottom.  But, with a little thought they could be used on other types.


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mike_victoriabc

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Re: Motor Mounting Part 1
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2019, 02:54:14 AM »

Don't go out a purchase a sheet of aluminum - have a look for your wife's cooking sheets - convince her she's misplaced them.
Got a few mounting brackets made up before she realized what I was using!
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Tug Fanatic

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Re: Motor Mounting Part 1
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2019, 08:53:49 AM »

Don't go out a purchase a sheet of aluminum - have a look for your wife's cooking sheets - convince her she's misplaced them.
Got a few mounting brackets made up before she realized what I was using!
That sounds very very very expensive - and not just money!!!  <:( <:( <*< >>:-( >>:-(
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warspite

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Re: Motor Mounting Part 1
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2019, 10:51:26 AM »

The Uk's are usually steel anyway, though the turkey trays are thicker than the bacofoil, could they work or are they still to thin  {-)
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Colin Bishop

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Re: Motor Mounting Part 1
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2019, 01:41:42 PM »

For smaller motors aluminium angle can work very well. Just three holes needed to mount the motor.

Colin

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coch y bonddu

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Re: Motor Mounting Part 1
« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2019, 03:26:03 PM »

I've used that method myself as well as most of the other ways mentioned by GG I know of one modeler who fixes his motors in using blue tack and that seems to work well.


I must admit my own method is to use a solid coupling to get the correct angle and bend some ali or Steel and make my own mounting but recently I have had great success by making my own mounting using resin to hold the lower half or the motor and then bolting a physical strap to prevent it turning...Each method that has been mentioned by GG and others have their own merits,horses for courses so to speak....what works for yourself is the way to go as long as the motor and shaft are in perfect alignment.....and boy oh boy have i seen and do see also on new builds motors and shafts at horrendous angles.


What everyone has to realise is simple really a Huco coupling or whatever one you choose is not a fix for poor alignment and in any case a poorly aligned motor will draw far far more current than one which is in perfect harmony with the shaft ...FACT


Dave
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