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Author Topic: Workshop / Shed Suppliers  (Read 1807 times)

SJG001

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Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« on: December 13, 2019, 07:00:25 am »

After the available space in my new (2017) workshop got reduced / used up  :D  - I am new having to buy a new one. Currently all my tools / projects have been relegated to the loft. (Won't mention new tools / powertools being bought (and hidden in the loft) %) )


As I am not impressed with the local suppliers has anyone had any experience with the following companies.


https://www.buyshedsdirect.co.uk/sheds
https://www.gardenbuildingsdirect.co.uk/garden-sheds
https://www.sheds.co.uk/
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gingyer

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2019, 07:38:32 am »

I got a shed last year what is manufactured by a company called Empire sheds.
Itís sold by lots of different companies under different names.


It was a pile of .....  >>:-( >>:-( >>:-(


Find out who makes the actual shed and then avoid
I got a 50% refund when I complained with out any problem but I wish I just got them to take the
Thing away to the skip
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grendel

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2019, 08:03:01 am »

generally when it comes to sheds, I will buy the timber and build my own, a 2"x2" frame then whatever sheeting (shiplap or marine ply, doesnt matter) and for the roof, ply sheeting topped by sheet steel roof panelling, I can guarantee being able to walk on the roof and feel safe. flooring - I rarely put a wooden floor in, generally I sit it on paving slabs and put down any flooring (lino etc) over the paving slabs, though the last one I built with a floor in it I was using large packing crates as material and used 2 thicknesses at right angles (1 1/2" thick floor) and sat the whole thing on 4" x 4" beams, which sat on paving slabs. Nowadays I might consider a concrete base rimmed with a 2 brick high base to sit the shed frame on.
At least if you build it yourself, you get the finished shed that you want / need.
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SJG001

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2019, 08:31:02 am »

Ideally - I would build my own - but timescales and other commitments means I don't have time.

Empires Shed - not sure if it was them, but a company very similar was at a show at the SEC Glasgow - Not impressed.

Deliver to Scotland ? - No - but we do deliver to the the UK mainland. :-X
Cost to deliver to Inverness ?- Sorry we don't deliver to the Western Isles   :-X

 >>:-( I
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roycv

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2019, 08:38:29 am »

Hi, I made my first shed then moved house and planned to do it again but was not using enough wood to get any discounts.  So I knew roughly how much a square foot it was costing.  I got on to a wood supplies company that built bespoke sheds showed them my plan and we tweaked it and the cost came in at roughly what I would have spent on wood.  It has served me well for nearly 30 years.  2 new roofs a move a new floor (I wanted a more solid one).
I do recommend double glazing it is not expensive.

Might be worth checking woodyards local to you if they do this?
Regards

Roy
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DaveM

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2019, 08:59:17 am »

When we moved in 2018 I had to put up a new workshop. I chose Tiger Sheds of Leeds and bought one of their Zeta log cabins. It was very well made and an excellent price. I can recommend them unreservedly.
https://www.tigersheds.com/
DaveM
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plastic

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2019, 03:00:45 pm »

Why not build a proper workshop with bricks and a tiled roof?    It'll last 100 years with very little maintenance - and if you do it yourself, it's really cheap.

A pallet of bricks is about 70sqft, roof tiles are about 70p each, a big upvc window is £150 - and it's just messy Lego to put it all together - and if your average bricky can do it, I'm sure anyone can.     Getting materials from ebay reduces the cost further - I picked up 1000 vintage bricks for £150 a few months ago.
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dreadnought72

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2019, 03:25:10 pm »


https://www.buyshedsdirect.co.uk/sheds


I had space for a 14' by 5' shed, so I bought two 7' by 5' pents off these guys, and nailed 'em together.


Price was great, materials 'good enough'. I replaced the awful plastic window sheeting with toughened glass, and blocked up the one unneeded doorway with materials salvaged from the two unneeded end walls.


Andy
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RMH

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2019, 05:29:39 pm »

That log cabin looks nice but I'd be worried about it being broken into if I used it as a workshop.
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DaveM

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2019, 07:02:09 pm »

That log cabin looks nice but I'd be worried about it being broken into if I used it as a workshop.
That perhaps says more about your neighbourhood than the design of the cabin - which is much more substantial than any conventional garden shed I've ever had. It has double-glazing and the timber is 44mm thick AND interlocked. Bear in mind that anyone who is really determined to break into a garden building will find a way of doing so. It's more a question of deterring the beggars and encouraging them to move on. Locked metal cabinets are a good idea. Works for me - so far....
DaveM


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david48

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #10 on: December 13, 2019, 08:48:49 pm »


 I am with DM , I see you are in Inverness ,before the weather stops you coming over the Lecth , have a trip over to Deeside Log Cabin at Kincardine O Neil . I bought my 5m x 6m shed from them , with no windows and a side door, same construction as Mr DM . Thy have a very good choice and style  to DIY build or thy will build it or you .
That's my 2 penny worth .
David
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Corposant

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #11 on: December 13, 2019, 09:03:24 pm »

I too have used Tigersheds (c. 18 months ago). Very pleased with build quality, materials and service.
Mike M
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RMH

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #12 on: December 13, 2019, 09:32:18 pm »

So are the tigersheds log cabins a diy build as in slotting the individual logs together.  I do actually live in a fairly safe area and the only access I have to my back garden is by coming through the garage or climbing over neighbours fences so any shed would have to come through my garage and fit through the side door which is the same size as a normal house door so large prefab panels probably wouldn't fit through.
Richie
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SJG001

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #13 on: December 13, 2019, 09:58:11 pm »

Why not build a proper workshop with bricks and a tiled roof?    It'll last 100 years with very little maintenance - and if you do it yourself, it's really cheap.

A pallet of bricks is about 70sqft, roof tiles are about 70p each, a big upvc window is £150 - and it's just messy Lego to put it all together - and if your average bricky can do it, I'm sure anyone can.     Getting materials from ebay reduces the cost further - I picked up 1000 vintage bricks for £150 a few months ago.


Unfortunately the local planning department would have a significant say...and there is some bad history in the area from before I moved in.
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plastic

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2019, 07:39:15 am »


Unfortunately the local planning department would have a significant say...and there is some bad history in the area from before I moved in.
You can usually build any outbuilding you like - there are rules that change slightly depending on where you live but they don't require planning permission.      The basics are less the 20sqm floor area and less than 4m high for apex roof or 3m for pent roof - other than that, you're free to do whatever as long as you don't build over 50% of your back garden area.       I built a huge garage in my back garden -  it's a little 'overbuilt' so it looks like a very pretty bungalow (I used Wickes upvc French doors on the side because they were cheaper than any shed door and they let in loads of light)     Planning and building regs depts were not interested.     Look on your local council planning website - it's all there.
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alan cantwell

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #15 on: December 14, 2019, 08:12:46 am »

Don't look for shed, look for garden workshop, heavier timber,
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DaveM

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2019, 08:14:11 am »

So are the tigersheds log cabins a diy build as in slotting the individual logs together.  I do actually live in a fairly safe area and the only access I have to my back garden is by coming through the garage or climbing over neighbours fences so any shed would have to come through my garage and fit through the side door which is the same size as a normal house door so large prefab panels probably wouldn't fit through.
Richie
The log cabins are delivered as a large bundle of individual CNC-cut "logs" which do indeed slot together. It's not a huge DIY job but as I don't have any big strong lads to help me do it I used Tiger's contractors. They took a day and a half and did a thoroughly good job. I did the painting job myself. There's a picture sequence here https://www.modelboats.co.uk/albums/member_album.asp?a=48655
As regards the thickness you can chose between 28mm and 44mm - I went fo the thicker stuff.
DaveM
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SJG001

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #17 on: December 14, 2019, 08:36:54 am »

You can usually build any outbuilding you like - there are rules that change slightly depending on where you live but they don't require planning permission.      The basics are less the 20sqm floor area and less than 4m high for apex roof or 3m for pent roof - other than that, you're free to do whatever as long as you don't build over 50% of your back garden area.       I built a huge garage in my back garden -  it's a little 'overbuilt' so it looks like a very pretty bungalow (I used Wickes upvc French doors on the side because they were cheaper than any shed door and they let in loads of light)     Planning and building regs depts were not interested.     Look on your local council planning website - it's all there.


I have already been down this line with planning - this is why I am looking at timber as opposed to brickwork/blockwork. My background is civil engineering design/construction and I got a chartered planner involved early on.
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plastic

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #18 on: December 14, 2019, 09:58:32 am »


I have already been down this line with planning - this is why I am looking at timber as opposed to brickwork/blockwork. My background is civil engineering design/construction and I got a chartered planner involved early on.
You got a chartered planner involved with building a garden shed????     May I ask what the restrictions are where you live - it all sounds a bit strange.
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alan cantwell

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #19 on: December 14, 2019, 11:23:03 am »

If itís a timber building, itís classed as portable, if itís brck, your immediately into building regs for a permanent structure, foundations, building inspectors, a whole new set of rules, tis roundhere, anyway

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SJG001

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #20 on: December 14, 2019, 11:35:47 am »

If itís a timber building, itís classed as portable, if itís brck, your immediately into building regs for a permanent structure, foundations, building inspectors, a whole new set of rules, tis roundhere, anyway


Plastic  - Alan's right - Timber is classed as a portable structure as opposed to a concrete / blockwork structure which is classed as permanent.


I tried to put up a  blockwork garage when I moved in and it got to the stage I involved a colleague who is a chartered planner.
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plastic

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2019, 12:43:47 pm »


Plastic  - Alan's right - Timber is classed as a portable structure as opposed to a concrete / blockwork structure which is classed as permanent.


I tried to put up a  blockwork garage when I moved in and it got to the stage I involved a colleague who is a chartered planner.
That's odd - how close to your house will your shed be?      If it's over 5m away, then it's usually classed as an outbuilding and no regs apply (around here).        If it's adjacent, they assume it will be incorporated into the house at some time as an extension so they will want it built to the same standards.   Planning only get involved if you want to exceed the published size limits for outbuildings over 5m from the house.
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modboat

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #22 on: December 14, 2019, 01:13:17 pm »

Having sold Garden sheds for a living a short while ago this might help.
All comments on brick are true and although longer lasting, you may move or change plans in the future.
You can move a timber structure, even to another site.
I would suggest if buying a timber structure (don't buy plastic or metal as prone to condensation even if insulated)
Please remember that timber is a natural product and on a new shed will not fit correctly 100% so it is normal to whittle and hit for a better fit, this is normal, its the amount of whittle/hit you will have to do that makes the difference.


Log style construction only buy over 50mm minimum (70)mm plus is best as the smaller logs warp and twist the larger ones may not require further insulation. However unless you go for a Shire Garden Buildings cheap shed you won't get a panel shed through the doors, Shire make these in smaller panels for this reason but two panels at 4ft is not as strong as one 8ft panel
Only buy quality on these as skimping will cost in the long run.


On standard sheds I have found cheap and cheerful is not the way to go.
However paying silly money is also not cost effective I would say that 8x6 £350, 10x8 £500, 14x8 £1000 is a fair guide.
Spend a reasonable amount on the shed and do not skimp on getting the base right. 4" x 4" 8ft fence post's are good as beams.


Spend good money on insulation and a nice interior, I have previously used breathable membrane with plasterboard, also Celotex insulation is very expensive but as foil covered does not need a waterproof membrane in a good shed anyway.
One thing people always forget is the floor, again Celotex type here with a waterproof chipboard flooring, Wickes very cheap for this, hopefully you will spend a lot of time standing on this.
You must fit a small consumer unit for the electrics, not sure on new regs for this.


Hope the above helps, but remember most shed company's sell good sheds, but are also having to sell budget models to keep turnover going, don't buy budget.


 








 
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DaveM

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #23 on: December 14, 2019, 01:56:46 pm »

You must fit a small consumer unit for the electrics, not sure on new regs for this.

I had a professional sparks fit mine and he told me that the current regs (in 2018) insisted on one with a metal box. I got a very neat little one from Toolstation with two circuit breakers for around £30.
https://www.toolstation.com/axiom-metal-17th-edition-amendment-3-garage-consumer-unit/p24537
While you're there don't forget to buy a fire extinguisher!
The lighting is two x 5ft LED striplights with a 6A breaker and the power is a single ring on 20A.
DaveM
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SJG001

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Re: Workshop / Shed Suppliers
« Reply #24 on: December 14, 2019, 02:05:23 pm »

That's odd - how close to your house will your shed be?      If it's over 5m away, then it's usually classed as an outbuilding and no regs apply (around here).        If it's adjacent, they assume it will be incorporated into the house at some time as an extension so they will want it built to the same standards.   Planning only get involved if you want to exceed the published size limits for outbuildings over 5m from the house.


The regs in Scotland are slightly different. Most structures classed as permanent need planning over a certain cubic meter volume  - which is why I am going for a timber structure. Ironically I could put up a conservatory and not need planning but a garage sited where it needed to be to cover constructibility, operability and maintenance - No.
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