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Author Topic: Seaducer 45 SD3 NM Build  (Read 329 times)

Andyn

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Seaducer 45 SD3 NM Build
« on: January 06, 2020, 12:12:28 PM »

At the end of last year I had my new hull delivered - a Seaducer 90-100 SD3. This was custom made for me by Jerry with the Gecko Green metal flake deck, with white undersides. I decided it was so impressive that I had to order the 40 boat too. Both hulls are full carbon fibre layup and vacuum bagged. This one is the newest boat designed by Jerry, measure 45" long by 11" beam. This boat currently holds the mono speed record at 98mph, Seaducer boats have all sorts of records to their name, with various national title wins in the USA over the years.

Power for this thing is going to be the new CMB 91 M-Line, which chucks out 7 horsepower at nearly 30k rpm. Prop will initially be an Octura x465 for running in, hopefully stepping up to a x467. Radio is Jeti, with a Savox SB-2292SG on steering, a Hitec HSG-8315BH on throttle and a Hitec HS-430BH on mixture, all powered by a Hacker 2000mah 7.4v lipo.

Construction has started by assembling the glassfibre fuel tank tray, which just involves screwing and epoxying in some eyelets to secure cable ties to hold the tanks in place. Tanks are both Sullivan Slant types, with a 24ox main and 4oz header tank. Pipe pressure will feed into the main tank, which delivers fuel to the header to maintain a constant and consistant fuel supply to the motor. When this was all done, it was tacked into the hull with two ton epoxy, which will be strengthened further when it has cured.

With this boat I purchased Jerry's own Seaducer hardware set, which is beautifully machined and includes the strut, rudder, drop mounts for the engine and a pipe mount. Currently the mounts are with my mate Steve (along with my second M-line) to accurately drill the engine mounting screw holes. When these are back, I shall continue the build by mounting the motor in the hull. Stay tuned  ;)

















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Andyn

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Re: Seaducer 45 SD3 NM Build
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2020, 02:25:39 PM »

Next job - put it in the sink...


Most commonly done with cat hulls but I decided to do it with this, ‘pouring the tips’ involves standing the boat on end and pouring resin into the nose, in this case 10ml of West Systems laminating resin. This helps to ensure that in the event of a collision the force will be transfer down the hull and be dissipated, rather than just breaking the nose off. Because resin gets warm and cracks when setting in large volumes, it’s best to leave it to cure in the sink or a bucket.


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Andyn

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Re: Seaducer 45 SD3 NM Build
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2020, 11:47:00 AM »

Well it was abiut time the finger was extracted again on the 'ducer, yesterday I finally had a few hours free so it was back to work.

Work started by taking the angle grinder to the back of the mounts to cut down the overhanging thread from the rubber isolation bobbins.






With this done, I could mount the engine on the mounts and get it into the correct position in the boat (17 inches from tip of glowplug to the inside of the transom board, with a 5" legnth of 1/4" brass tube in the motor, with the end of the brass touching the bottom of the boat for the right angle). This was then marked for drilling, having checked that the engine starter belt has got enough room to slip out when the engine has started. The drop mounts allow you to get the flywheel almost touching the bottom of the boat, so it's important to make sure you can get the belt in and out.









With this marked, I could then use a right angle drill to drill out the rails. The whole lot is secured in with M5 bolts, with penny washers outside the rails. It is important to seal the wood so any water ingress won't decay the rails over time, so I just mix and poke in 5 minute epoxy whenever I drill holes through the wood.










With this done, I moved on to the transom hardware. I started by masking taping the whole transom, then drawing reference lines of where everything needs to work from. I started by drilling the 1/2" free flood / drain hole round the shaft exit. From there I lined up the strut and rudder, marked and drilled for each.

My only one complaint about the Seaducer hardware pack is that the screws aren't really the highest quality, but no matter as they'll probably never need to be removed. Jerry's machined hardware is second to none, it's of excellent quality and the material used is very high grade. What interested me about the strut in particular is that it has a 3 degree offset machined into the leg, to couter prop effects on the boat. Clever tricks - and why everyone says that if you don't use the Seaducer hardware the boat will never run right...












Lastly for the transom hardware is the pipe mount. The base is lined up with the inside of the strut so the excess arm if needed can fit in the gap between the strut mounting points. Unfortunately the on part I didn't take in to work (where I'm building the boat) was the pipe, and as it turns out all my pipes are too long to use the kit end mount (in the US they run unsilenced pipes which are a good 6" shorter than the silenced pipes we use here). No bother as Prestwich Models do a 50mm pipe mount that will hold my pipe and fit onto Jerry's mount. Win  :-))




Not pictured, I also marked up where the turn fin will place and notched the deck of the hull to fit it in to. I also marked and drilled the mounting screws, though have not mounted the fin yet as it is incredibly sharp.



Next up is cutting the rudder down to height. Using a 24" ruler along the bottom of the hull I marked the point where the rudder blade is in line with the hull, then a square line 3 3/4" down the blade from that point to cut the blade to.








Last for today was mocking up the positioning for the servos, I've gone for a total deviation on the instructions here as I despise the use of wood on glassfibre in radio boxes. I've gone for all ally mounts bolted through the bottom of the box. The throttle is top left of the picture, rudder bottom left and mixture bottom right. There is plenty of clearance top right for the 2000mah 7.4v Li-Po and reciever to be placed, with room to the right of the mixture servo for an Ian's Boats waterproof switch. I'll be replacing the macine screws in the picture with button head M3 screws from the outside in, as the washers and lock nuts foul the bottom of the boat if on the outside of the box.








Lastly for this installment was mounting the pipe pressure filter / cooler, this is a unit from Answer RC that will help to reduce the amount of detritus that will find its way from the pipe into the tanks. It came with its own clip mount that is threaded underneath for M3, so I drilled and tapped the rail M3, then epoxied in a length of threaded brass bar.



Next up will be the shaft stuffing tube, shaft bearings in the strut and mixture control mount, then it's pretty much on the home straight from there  :-))
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martno1fan

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Re: Seaducer 45 SD3 NM Build
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2020, 02:49:02 PM »

Nice hull does it have a hatch or not ?.Looking at the pics is it my eyes or is the exit hole offset to the left ? .
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Andyn

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Re: Seaducer 45 SD3 NM Build
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2020, 02:53:31 PM »

Nope no hatch, the hole is offset to the V but central in the width of the hull, as is the strut - all done to the Seaducer instructions :-))
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martno1fan

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Re: Seaducer 45 SD3 NM Build
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2020, 11:39:46 AM »

Never ever seen a strut or stinger offset to the left ,right yes for obvious reasons ie to overcome prop walk etc .Central to the width of the hull means little if its not at the keel , offsetting to the left would surely only make handling and any prop walk worse not better . Interested to know why they recommend offsetting to the left rather than right thats a new one . I know quite a few guys in the States running these hulls and as far as i know they all offset to the right not left , doesnt make any sense to me to be on the left .
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martno1fan

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Re: Seaducer 45 SD3 NM Build
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2020, 12:08:46 PM »

I just read the instructions on their website and it mentions drawing a vertical  line at the v and drilling the hole there just up from the bottom of the v no mention of an offset .Can you show me where it mentions an offset to the left on the instructions you have seen ?.
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martno1fan

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Re: Seaducer 45 SD3 NM Build
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2020, 12:13:59 PM »

This is copied from the instructions ,put a mark up from the v ,not central to the boat .Some hulls might be wider one side of the v to the other .Just trying to save you messing up your build .STEP 6 - Mounting the Strut Assembly1.Place  the  hull  on  a  work-cradle  (1  1.4)  to  view  the  stern;  draw  a  vertical  centerline  on  the  transom as shown on Figure 1. Mark a point 7/16-inch up from the bottom Vee and drill a 1/2-inch  hole  at  this  point  thru  the  transom.  (Note  the  drilled  hole  should  just  clear  the  fiberglass  floor on the inside hull.)2.The  Strut  Assembly  package  (2b)  includes  the  strut  with  adjustment  slot,  two  L-mounting  brackets,  plus  mounting  hardware.  Refer  to  Fig.  1,  Fig.  2  &  Pic.  #4  and  assemble  the  strut  snugly  between  the  two  L-brackets  to  allow  up  &  down  slot  movement;  note  that  the  L-brackets  must  be  evenly  aligned  on  the  bottom.  Position  this  assembly  on  the  transom  1  ¾  inch below the deck as shown on Fig.l. The strut's rear opening should roughly line-up  with  the  1/2-inch transom hole and be 2 inches away from the transom as shown in Fig. 2.). Mark the 4 L-bracket  mounting  holes  and  drill  thru  the  transom  with  a  5/32  bit.  Mount  the  assembly  with  the supplied cap screws & locknuts. (Use silicone sealer in these and all later mounting holes to reduce water entry.)3.Refer to Fig. 2 and move the strut up or down, via the slot, to  line-up with the 1/2-inch transom hole. Secure the strut using the cap screws & locknuts included in the package
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