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Author Topic: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro  (Read 2619 times)

Steve Mahoney

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The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« on: March 15, 2020, 05:02:00 am »

Well, the Sea Mule is done and dusted, and the build wasnít very fufilling. Perhaps it was the subject Ė maybe all the straight lines, or the styrene construction, or all of that grey paint. I just never really got into it. However, now my bench is clear, and with this next project Iím back on familiar ground. Iím back to my happy place Ė an NZ tug, made out of wood.

While I was researching my next project, the 1971, 17m, New Plymouth, Voith tug Maui (photo 1), I visited Russell Wardís great site www.tugboats.co.nz. That was a mistake.

Every time I visit the site I find a new tug thatís crying out to be built as a model. Last time I got hooked by a photo of the 1925 Kumea and that immediately jumped to the top of my wishlist. Turned into a model that Iím still quite pleased with.

This time, tucked away at the bottom of a site page was an old newspaper clipping from 1945 with a photo of a tug Iíd never heard of before: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. tug: Maro.

Last century the Colonial Sugar Refinery Co produced sugar in Australia and Fiji and shipped it all over the British Empire. CSR is no more but in its heyday it was a huge monopoly, owning vast areas of Queensland and Fiji, had its own refineries, railways, harbours and a dozen cargo ships, plus tugs.

The Maro was a 50ft, wooden, diesel tug built at the companyís Auckland Chelsea refinery yard in late 1945-6 by the CSRís own, in-house shipwright Ė talk about vertical market integration.

It had a Gardner 8LW engine, single screw and was built to handle the companyís ships and barges that called at the refinery on Auckland harbourís North Shore.

Seems strange that they built a tug at that time as just down the road at Devonport Naval Base the NZ and US Navies were decommissioning and disposing of a lot of surplus wartime equipment. A fleet of mothballed boats was in Auckland harbor until completely disposed of until the late Ď40s. A lot of USN stuff like YTLs, Sea Mules and workboats went up to the smaller Pacific islands, the surplus RNZN tugs were distributed around the countryís smaller ports. Wellington, my home town, ended up with 2 former Royal Navy Envoy Class tugs. Some of the USN workboats went up to Hong Kong as police boats (last photo).

Most NZ tugs prior to WWII were built in Britain however during the war dozens of tugs were built in Auckland for the USN and Iím thinking that any tug built there at the end of the war would surely have been influenced by the navy tugs that had been built just across the harbour. Some of the USN workboats were quite an advanced design for 1945 (photos 5 & 6) compared to the YTL tugs being produced at the same time.

The Maro does look a little like the USN workboat made across the harbour and its silhouette is more similar to a traditional US tug than to any British design of the era Ė low superstructure over the engine-room, square stern, high wheelhouse, short funnel, low gunwales, wrap-around front windows. Itís very different from the usual NZ tugs of that time with its pre-war shaped hull, tall US style wheelhouse, and very 1950s style funnel.

There is virtually no information and only a handful of photos of the Maro left. I did find a profile photo, one from the bow quarter and one of the stern in dry dock. That should be enough to draw up some hull lines and a basic GA Ė with a bit of guesswork.

Maro was sold into private ownership sometime in the 1960s and extensively modified Ė but not in a good way. The latest image I have is from sometime in the Ď70s or Ď80s and it looks like it has been altered a few more times and is unrecognizable from the original layout. Iíll make it as it is in the first photo I found Ė brand new and on its sea trials.

It should make an interesting and unique little model.
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2020, 09:31:29 pm »

So, here goesÖ

Construction will be plank on frame Ė my usual process. Drawing up the lines was pretty straightforward-ish. The hull lines are based on a generic US wooden 45ft tug hull, amended to fit from a plan I found online.

I used the photos, the 50ft LOA, and the 6í6íí height of the wheelhouse ceiling as starting points to figure out the proportions of the superstructure. Russell Ward, who started me down this track, remembers going on board many years ago, and that the wheelhouse was tiny, Ďlike a phone boxí and that it had a Ďvery large wheelí.

The sole photo of the boat out of water shows the very full curve of the hull, rudder footing, shaft and a squared off stern/transom. The stern lines are very fine. Looks pretty close to the lines I found online, only a little adjustment and change to the squared stern deck needed.

At 1/50 this comes out to a model of 310mm LOA, 90mm wide, 130mm high. That gives the 50ft Maro a beam of 14.5ft and a draught of 6.8ft. Sounds about right.

So far, so good.

As with my previous builds, this is the same old process: the keel and ribs are laser cut 3.6mm and 1.5mm ply. The deck ply has the planking lines etched into it on the other side. Forgot to get a photo of it at this stage. 

If you've seen one of my builds you'll know the drill. Everything slotted together pretty quickly and were braced to keep everything true and square. This trusty old building board has been used on my last 5 or 6 builds. Itís way to big for this little project but itís there and it works fine Ė one size, many styles. Probably got a few more projects left in it yet.

This is a display only model so no need to worry about interior space, which explains all of the internal bracing.

The deck with the planking lines laser etched into it and has already been stained a Ďteakí colour. Plenty of teak in Fiji and it would have been easy to send some down as deck cargo on one of the sugar boats. The Ďtimberí deck will be masked to prevent any wayward glue or paint spoiling the finish. The masking wonít come off until final painting stage. Iíve done this on a couple of previous builds and it saves a lot of potential headaches.

Once the bow and stern were packed out with balsa blocks, the hull was faired Ė quickly and simply with some 80 and 120 grit paper, before the first planks went on. Iím using 2mm basswood for the planks. Not too many complex curves on this one so steaming won't be necessary.

The downloaded hull lines that I used as a starting point for the hull proved to be a bit inaccurate and had a pronounced Ďhipí in the curve of the hull around the stern mid-sections. I had copied them faithfully but it sometimes happens that the originals arenít exactly correct. Before any glueing happens I always lay a few planks over the frames at various places to make sure that the curves are smooth and natural looking. No extra packing required, just the Ďhipsí to be smoothed out. This was rectified with a bit of aggressive sanding before the first planks could be attached.
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2020, 09:28:01 am »

My planking is not up to the standard of many of the guys on the forum so I wonít embarrass myself by showing too many progress photos. As much as Iíd like to be, Iím not a model shipwright. For me, the planking is merely to form the basic shape of the hull. A few sessions of filler, sanding and painting will turn the rough hull into a much smoother surface that looks like a proper hull.

For the planks Iím using 2mm Basswood/Lime strips. They went on a lot easier and more smoothly than expected. I start with a plank that fits with the most ease and then work away either side of it, same position port and starboard.

I was able to get the whole lot done in one decent session over the course of a morning and an afternoon. I used 10 tubes of CA Gel Ė most of it on my fingers. Luckily they are cheap Ė tubes of glue, not fingers. Had to have a couple of breaks outside as I was starting to enjoy the fumes a bit too much. Ate half a Date Loaf during one of the breaks.

When the planking had reach up to about the waterline I put a coat of polyester resin and some matting on the interior to give the planks some extra adhesion and solidity. It also helps if I sand any areas too finely later on.

This resin strengthening partís not easy with the deck in place but Iíve done it a few times before and have figured out the best/easiest way to do it. When the resin has been poured in through a funnel I slosh it around to make sure all of the interior gets a good covering and then press some coarse matting into it along the inboard side of the planks. Works fine.

More fumes, more Date Loaf.

The rough hull has had a sand to fair it up and now it needs a coat of white primer to really highlight any bumps, dents or areas that need fixing. Then the work really begins.

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SteamboatPhil

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2020, 05:15:43 pm »

That is nice work so far, its a great shape  :-))
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derekwarner

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2020, 02:13:26 am »

Must agree with SteamboatPhil......the above water lines belie the actual beauty :kiss:  of her underwater lines....... Derek
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2020, 12:28:22 am »

Thanks steamboatPhil and Derek.

It is starting to come together now. We are in full virus lockdown for the next 4 weeks so plenty of bench time ahead.

The hull has now had 2 sessions of fill, sand and paint and itís at a stage where I can attach the bulwarks. Plenty of work left to do on the hull but some other parts need to be attached first. The laser cut bulwark knees/supports slot into their pre aligned holes pretty easily. They look a bit wonky but they are all square and perpendicular to the deck. The shear makes some of them look out of alignment.

On closer inspection a few days later, some were out of alignment. These were pulled out very gently with some pliers and re-fitted.
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2020, 12:53:32 am »

Next step is the bulwarks but before they go on I need to attach the rubbing strip. This is quite narrow around the side of the boat but much wider at the stern where it extends out from the transom.

I would normally apply the bulwarks before the rubbing strip but it goes on now to clean and cover up the messy edge between the deck and the top planks. It also gives me a nice clean line to butt the base of the bulwark ply up to.

The rubbing strip made up of sections of 3mm basswood. 2 stern, 2 bow and 2 side sections. The long segments along the sides are slightly bent upwards at the bow end to follow the shear of the deck. This was done with brute force and many clamps while glueing. Basswood is a nice material to work with.

The top edge is the most critical, any gaps are easily filled. The hull at the stern needs a little extra work under the transom but nothing too drastic.

The stempost has been re-instated and rudder box has been added.

Now it all needs tidying up. Back the the fill, sand, prime, repeat cycle. It's raining all day and we can't go out for our allocated exercise so this will be a nice diversion.
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Martin [Admin]

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2020, 03:18:27 am »


This is a beautiful build Steve!   :-))

... could you put a cup, can of coke, etc. in one of the next photos please as I'm not fully appreciating the scale  :embarrassed:
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dougal99

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2020, 01:47:56 pm »

Martin, I think you'll find the squares on the cutting mat are 5 cm.
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2020, 09:22:53 pm »

Thanks Martin, I'm able to put in a reasonable stretch at the bench each day at the moment so things are progressing well.

Dougal Ė you are correct. I'd never thought about it but the grid is 2" squares. Can hardly see the lines these days.

Anyway the bulwarks went on without any problems Ė too easy in fact, which always gets me worried. The worst time for Apaches is when there's no sign of Apaches!

I started with the section around the stern corners and transom:  2 layers of 0.4mm ply. The straight side sections are a single layer of 0.8mm ply laid so the bias of the ply runs horizontally Ė along the line of the deck. That's so that 2 of the 3 ply layers are running the way I want. The gentler curves at the bow are 0.8mm laid the other way to make the curve.

I make sure the ply is a good fit at the base, along the deck line and leave some excess at the top. A series of thin card patterns helps. The attached ply is easily sanded down to the top of the supports. But you guys all know how to do this. Turned out OK and is a lot stronger than it looks.

Once the rub rail and bulwarks were on I could add the last little bits to the hull and start finishing it off

Now a few more sessions of fill, sand, paint. Rinse and repeat...

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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2020, 11:38:28 pm »

That wasnít too bad, only needed 5 sessions of fill, sand & prime in total. Some hulls have had up to 7 or 8. For some reason hard chine hulls often give me more trouble. The SDM I built a few years ago got up to double figures. It had semi-circular bow and stern sections with very regular curves that showed any tiny bump or flat spot.

The scuppers/freeing ports and hawser holes have been cut out and the capping rail has been added. The bulwarks are very low and there will be a steel railing added later.

The scuppers are quite small and she sits pretty low in the water with not much freeboard Ė adequate for inner harbour work but not really sufficient for the open sea. This little tug used to tow loads across the Colville Channel out to Great Barrier Island Ė 80km. 99 times out of 100 that stretch is flat calm and a great trip. Iíve done a 1% trip and it can get very hairy. Our 45ft launch was reduced to very low speed heading straight into a huge breaking swell and was being thrown around Ė a lot. Our scuppers were working overtime. Everything in the cabin, galley, cupboards, fridge, drawers, lockers, etc was thrown all over the cabin, like a bomb had gone off in the place. The 1 tonne anchor chain in the chain locker was being thrown around so much we thought it might punch a hole in the side. When we eventually docked it had knotted itself into a solid ball. Took hours with a sledgehammer and 2 crowbars to even get it out of the locker to begin to untangle it. That was the least of our problems. It had been so rough that our chiller bin full of beer (50 kilos/20 doz cans) for our fishing weekend had bounced over the transom and was lost. One of the guys, with 30 years skippering experience, had been violenty seasick Ė for the first time ever Ė he blames it on the sight of the beer abandoning ship. Heís now known as ĎColville Chowderí. Ask him for something to eat and thatís what heíll bring up.

Back to the build Ė a little more tweaking and the hull will be ready for some paint.
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2020, 09:26:19 pm »

I may have mentioned before that I am super fussy with my hull finishes. Probably too fussy but I find this part quite relaxing, working my way up through the sandpaper grades until itís the 1200 Wet & Dry. Canít hide anything there. Beside, there's not much else to do in virus lockdown. Luckily the weather has been lovely, a last effort of summer, so sanding outdoors and painting has been pleasant.

Well, the final touches to the hull took a bit longer than planed. The more I buffed it up with the 1200 W&D the more I kept finding tiny areas that needed a little more attention. A couple of the planks I had used for the hull were quite a bit softer than the rest and these seemed to get a lot of pressure dents and scuffs from the slightest bump. All fixed now with a bit more filler and some resin.

The hull now no bumps, dents or spots, nothing. It is as smooth as a babyís bum Ė which, as you know, is the internationally recognised technicnal term denoting the maximum smoothness possible. Feels like a plastic hull. Really worth the effort. Iím happy now.

Eagle-eyed viewers may have noticed that Iíve broken the rudder footing. But thank you for not mentioning it.

Yes, Iíve done this before Ė several times. This time I was a bit rough while drilling the hole for the rudder post. Itís easily fixed and actually makes attaching the rudder much easier. Thatís my story and Iím sticking to it.

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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2020, 09:28:15 pm »

The photo that initially got me interested in the Maro is a black & white image taken during her sea trials. They show the hull and superstructure in a mid tone colour. Pretty hard to tell what it was. In late 1945 there would have been plenty of surplus grey paint in Auckland. After nearly 6 years of war everyone was pretty sick of grey paint but there werenít a lot of other choices. Paint was still rationed and this was the time when every railway wagon/carriage, farm building, fence, shed, and corrugated iron house roof in the country was painted Red Oxide. In those days if it wasnít painted Red Oxide it was primer grey, waiting to be painted Red Oxide.

The funnel band and interior appear to be white (option 1).

The black & white profile shot from a few years later is probably very dark navy blue hull with a white superstructure Ė as were all of the CSR cargo ships. The funnels were the same hull blue with a red band and a black top strip (option 2). Iíve already got 5 tug models with dark blue hulls so that colour scheme is not doing it for me at the moment.

The next image shows the CSR funnel and company pennant designs. The lettering on the funnels was only used on the cargo ships, not the tugs.

The only colour photo I have of the Maro is from the 1960s or Ď70s when she was in private ownership with Subritzky Shipping and show her with a black and bright pale green hull, white bulwarks/superstructure with mid green trim/roofs. Black capping rail and deck equipment. The funnel is black with a green band and white stripes above and below it. The wheelhouse/bridge has a green band running around it. The superstructure over the engineroom had been completely altered when this photo was taken and totally changes the looks. They also raised the bulwarks at the bow and added some boxt structures around the funnel. It all looks rubbish but the colours are quite nice (option 3).

Subritzkys used her for general towing, a lot of their work was taking supplies out to the islands in the Hauraki Gulf. They are still going today as SeaLink and operate ferries and freight to Waiheke, Rakino, Great Barrier and several other islands out from Auckland. They donít use the green livery these days.

I had planned on making mine as it is in the first photo I found: brand new and one colour over-all: Red Oxide above the waterline and superstructure, black below the waterline, (there would have been a ton of black anti-fouling paint available, ex-navy), teak deck. Primer grey or white roof and trim. White band on the funnel and white interior.

TimB made a Thames tosher tug on RCGroups in all Red Oxide and it looks great. Red Oxideís colour and tone varies greatly depending on the age of the paintjob, wear & tear, application, manufacturer and the amount of sun it gets so it could be at one end, or other, of the Red Oxide spectrum. Iíve always liked the Moran Tugs maroon colour, which is almost in the range.

However, the more I looked at the 1970ís photo in the green and white, the more I liked that colour scheme. The green is a very 60ís colour. So Iíve decided to go for that. Itís first repaint under new ownership Ė before they altered and ruined the superstructure lines.
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #13 on: April 14, 2020, 09:27:54 pm »

So, hereís the painted hull. Took a bit longer to get here than the usual route.

I painted the white bulwarks first Ė all OK.

Then the green of the hull. Because we are in a total virus lock-down no shops are open and no mail order is available, I had to use whatever paints I had on hand. I always use Humrol enamels and luckily I had a selection of greens and blues in my box of tricks. Not quite the right greens and blues to mix the correct colour though. I got close in a pea green sort of way but after painting the hull and the inboard bulwarks I couldnít live with it. Wrong green, and on closer inspection of the sole colour photo reference, the inner bulwarks were white. They were easily but time consumingly re-sprayed.

Getting the correct green was a problem. I couldnít get even close to it with the Humbrol paints. I use Humbrol out of habit from when they were the only thing available back in the Ď70s. I guess I use enamels because they are used on real boats. And Iím used to them.

This time I couldnít get what I wanted and so in the very back of the cupboard I found some old Valiejo acrylics that had been used for a Christmas gift a few years ago. Desperate times, desperate measures Ė Iíll give them a go!

I was able to mix exactly the right colour and it went through the airbrush no problem at all. Nice and opaque, even colour, and the perfect satin sheen, dries in no time and cleans up in water.

After years of blissful ignorance Iím now an acrylic convert. Why didnít you guys tell me sooner?

The hull colour is just what I was after. The black anti-fouling took several/3 coats to match the sheen of the acrylic. The black is a real dust magnet. Same with my cars Ė after 3 black cars in a row that constantly collected dust and pollen I now have a white one.

The deck had been pretty well protected with masking tape during the hull forming stage and came through it all without too much damage. Nothing a little spot sanding and re-stain wonít fix.

OK. Iím happy with the hull so far. Only needs a couple of minor additions: bilge pump and waste water outlets. The propellor is one that Iíve had in the spares box for years. The size is just right. Bingo!

The hull can take a back-seat for a bit while I get on with the superstructure.
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RST

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #14 on: April 14, 2020, 10:02:06 pm »

Thats a great result!  I'm still persevering with Humbrol / Revell oil based tinlets, quality is pretty shocking these days but they are still brushable over a decent area.  Tried putting through the airbrush last week and just created clouds of airborn particles, and runs on the model.  Acrylics are definately the way forward for airbrushing!  I use Tamiya -not ventured yet to Vallejo yet except for varnish.  That said, I really struggle with white, yellow and red on acrylics.  I'm impressed wih your white work!

Rich
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #15 on: April 14, 2020, 10:26:16 pm »

Rich: Thanks. Still using enamel undercoat, the white always looks a lot better on top of that.

Are the Tamiya acrylics water clean up or do they need a special thinners?
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RST

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #16 on: April 14, 2020, 10:59:35 pm »

Tamiya bottle'lets (if that's a word) is water clean up.  The tub of thinners they do is not expensive and lasts a very long time, I've bought 2 in 10 years but granted it's been a while since I dusted off the fume cabinet and went spraying properly again.  Tamiya are well known for having a solvent content and their thinners work best though folk say to use window cleaner etc.  I use a drop of detergent for spraying through then finish with a few drops of tamiya thinner for cleaning.  For brush painting water clean-up with rubbing on soap, then a wad of spit on the brush (sounds horid but works perfect with any acrylic, spit seems to clean awesome) but I love them for airbrushing, they dry in seconds -but never to sure about longevity in a model that will get wet.  They are a like or lothe paint I think -but what isn't!  They're not great at brushing though -they dry very fast.  And white, yellow and red are just rubbish.

Taranis gets on well with their aerosol primer on metal.  I haven't, I thought it was terrible.  Each to their own!

Rich
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tassie48

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #17 on: April 15, 2020, 01:02:11 am »

Looks good mate well done tassie48
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2020, 09:21:59 pm »

Thanks Gregg. Good to see you are still kicking.

The laser cut parts for the superstructure fitted together pretty easily and quickly, with a little internal bracing to keep everything square. Looks a bit rough in the first photos but nothing to worry about.

Next stage, after a bit of filler, and the window frames and engine room companionway added. The 1mm wide window frames overlap the window hole by 0.5mm (to allow for the glazing) so there is only 0.5mm around the edge to glue. They seemed to give me more problems than they should have. Maybe I was just tired. Very fiddly and frustrating.

Now to tidy it up for undercoating.
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2020, 10:26:26 pm »

None of my reference photos show the access to the bridge/wheelhouse in any clarity so Iím having to guess here.

The wheelhouse deck is about 1200mm above the main deck Ė thatís 4 steps. But was it steps or a ladder.

The sea trials photo shows a very faint image of a top step/landing but itís pretty hard to decipher exactly whatís there. There are no grab-rails.

I ended up making 3 options to see which version looked about right: a standard ladder which continues up to form the grab-rail (top left in the second photo), a step ladder with tread plates (top right), and a set of steps with separate hand rails (bottom). Steps running along the deck up to the wheelhouse wonít work as the gap between the bulwark and wheelhouse is too narrow to fit them in real life.

The basic ladder would have been the easiest option but boat builders usually donít take the easy option Ė thatís what I normally do.

The basic ladder looks much too wide and it would have been difficult to open the door when balanced in the ladder.
The ladder with tread plates is a better solution and the Refinery would have had a metal working shop with skilled workers so this option could have easily been made on site.
The wooden step ladder fits in with the Ďfeelí of the boat and would have been much easier to get into the wheelhouse, especially standing on the 2nd or 3rd step and trying to open the door. Plus, if the boat builder took so much effort to make the wooden grab-rail supports that run along the funnel deck, making a couple of step-ladders would have been no problem at all.

I finished all 3 options and tried them on the boat Ė the wooden step ladders just seemed right. Looks right, feels right.

]The top step is around 1200mm off the main deck and only 1m away from the side of the boat, and the bulwarks opposite the door are only 500mm high, so any misstep by the crew leaving the wheelhouse and they would do a header straight into the drink. The boat in the sea trials photo probably isnít totally completed and later photos show an extended railing opposite the cabin door to catch any flying deckhands.

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derekwarner

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2020, 10:54:26 pm »

Interesting having fwd facing-opening bridge doors  :D


Great for catching a breeze on a subtropical river amongst the sugarcane, not so great for catching green wave spray  {-) down toward the Ditch


Not so sure the designer/builders understood this


Derek
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Derek Warner

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Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2020, 09:00:21 pm »

Well spotted Derek. That door is on the wrong side. Luckily the doors aren't glued in yet, only taped in for the photo. Won't be attached until everything has been painted and glazed.
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derekwarner

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2020, 11:50:21 pm »

Wasn't questioning your build as the original appears as fwd opening  :o  ..........


My only experience of wooden bridge doors in wooden planked bridges on similar sized vessels were sliding bridge doors ...sliding fwd to open.....then sliding astern to close & keep the spray out


Derek
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Derek Warner

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Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #23 on: April 26, 2020, 10:06:24 pm »

The lock-down restrictions are starting to kick in Ė Iím running very low on some materials and the mail order places donít re-open until next week. The lock-down came into effect so quickly that I didnít get a chance to stock up beforehand and now Iím getting low on pretty much everything: brass rod, styrene, filler, glue, paint, thinners and undercoat. For the next part of the build Iíll try and make a few items that I can paint in batches.

The funnel was pretty straightforward. Made with my usual laser cut spine, packed out with balsa, then skinned in 2 layers of 0.2mm styrene. Added a 1mm half round styrene strip for the rolled lip at the top and some styrene to form the flange mounting at the base. These photos are a bit blurry but you get the picture Ė nothing new here.


The fresh water tank was formed the same way Ė 2 layers of thin styrene wrapped around a balsa base. The details are styrene. The PE valve handle also came from the spares box.

Whenever I get some PE done I always make 2 or 3 spares of everything so I now have a spares box which is full of surplus companionways, stanchions, valve wheels, port-holes, grilles and louvres of all shapes and sizes. A lot of it is specific to a particular build but sometimes one of the bits is just right for a current project. I've gotten used to working with the little PE pieces and don't destroy as many as I had imagined so any future PE won't include so many extras. I'm trying to work my way through the spares box where ever possible. I won't need 7mm portholes for years.
The engine-room louvres were made from some surplus PE brass louvres from a project from 3 or 4 years back, either the SDM or the ATBs I think. They were the right width and just needed to be trimmed to the correct length. Much better than trying to make some out of styrene at that size: 12 x 12mm.

Letís see how they all look with some paint on.
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RST

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Re: The Colonial Sugar Refinery Co. Tug: Maro
« Reply #24 on: April 26, 2020, 10:33:57 pm »

Hi Steve, I presume you have your own laser cutter?


rich
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