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Author Topic: Receiver and Arduino link  (Read 674 times)

Nordlys

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Receiver and Arduino link
« on: June 26, 2020, 12:40:14 pm »

Can I control a standard Rx unit using an Arduino board instead of the remote control Tx?
N
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tsenecal

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Re: Receiver and Arduino link
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2020, 03:36:03 pm »

technically, yes, but not without a lot of other bits added to the arduino.  like an RF deck that "speaks the same language" as the receiver.
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Big Ada

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Re: Receiver and Arduino link
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2020, 04:42:35 pm »

Can I control a standard Rx unit using an Arduino board instead of the remote control Tx?
N
Look up Mike Mc Roberts of Medway Makers, Facebook, he is Mr Arduino and he sorted My Tug out with Lights.
Don't ask me how they work.
He lives in Kent.

Len.
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C-3PO

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Re: Receiver and Arduino link
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2020, 04:57:50 pm »

Hi Nordlys,

Whilst the technical answer maybe yes, the practical answer IMHO is no - so many variables - RX/TX Brand, protocol, ability, will to keep sanity etc. You go all the way from an old 40mhz brick like a Robbe RX - to a complex microcomputer controlled RX. You start trying to emulate a frequency hopping, listen before transmit RF solution you will be loosing brain cells quickly.

The RX being the device that communicates with/controls the "end" devices e.g. servos/ESC etc. - the Arduino can control these directly without the need for an RX.

What might be of interest is that the Arduino can read the output of the RC RX channels and then control your servo's/ESC etc in an enhanced way(logic event driven).

If you explain what your trying to achieve, what radio TX/RX and operating frequency you are going to use we may be able to point you in a logical direction - is this part of your autonomous boat project?

Regards
C-3PO
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malcolmfrary

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Re: Receiver and Arduino link
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2020, 05:41:30 pm »

As I understand the conventions, the receiver gets its signals from the transmitter, and offers information to either a bunch of servos, switchers, ESCs direct or to something like an arduino which considers the signals and rearranges them before presenting them to whatever is connected to its outputs.

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Nordlys

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Re: Receiver and Arduino link
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2020, 07:16:46 pm »

Ok, I'm a little off track by the sound of things with this Rx idea.


Just beginning to put together some hardware for this project, I have in fact bought an Action p40 mixer board which might be useful for running two motors, doing away with the need for a rudder for steering.


Interestingly, you say that Arduino can handle Rx commands such as motor speed, good.
Afraid I cannot answer your last question c3po, at the moment, I'm not up to date with the design side as yet. Yes it is part of the project.
Thanks for all the replies, all logged.
N.
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C-3PO

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Re: Receiver and Arduino link
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2020, 07:49:33 pm »

Nordlys,

No problem being a little off track - sometimes it's a great creative place to be.

To clarify , if you connect an Arduino to an RC RX you can read the frequency(PWM) of individual RC channels, the duration/length of each pulse. Typically the standard for the duration is between 1000 and 2000ms  (1000ms  - mid stick 1500ms  - 2000ms ).

Once you have the value of the PWM on any pin as a variable in your executing program you can decide what you want to do in the program logic. For example you might want to trigger one of the Arduino outputs on or off

An example could be:

if the PWM value is less than 1400ms turn Arduino output pin off
if the PWM value is greater than 1600ms turn Arduino ouput pin on

Then by moving the "stick" on the RC TX assigned to the channel you are reading you will change the PWM output of the RC RX, the Arduino will read the PWM frequency and turn the output pin on or off as per your settings (off < 1400ms  / on > 1600ms)

This is a very simple example - the complexity of your project is in the main limited only by your imagination.

Regards
C-3PO
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Nordlys

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Re: Receiver and Arduino link
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2020, 08:38:14 pm »

C3po. Thanks for that post, you lift my hopes of getting familiar with this Arduino kit eventually.


Really I need to get set up with a laptop and Arduino & software IDE so I can play around with commands such as you describe.


Regards
N.
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C-3PO

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Re: Receiver and Arduino link
« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2020, 09:11:55 pm »

Hi Nordlys,

I hope this post might make your journey easier.

Firstly - you will need to come familiar with the Arduino IDE ( a simple piece of software where you write your code), and the concept of uploading your program to your Arduino.

That's quite an easy step however there are still some simple things that will trip you up but you will soon learn how to deal with them - e.g. you can't upload your code because you have the wrong COM port selected.

After that it's down to getting a program to do what you want.

 I hope this will be the eye opener for you.

There is pretty much nothing that you want to code/ a unique solution you have dreamt up that someone else hasn't already done and got working and published their code online!

Rarely do you start with a blank program and code from scratch. You get blocks of code that do the tasks you want put them into one program and then tweak them to your specific needs.

The task you have embarked on will require external help to give you a leg up with the code so you have something you can then work with to understand what it's doing and eventually begin to tweak.

My suggestion would  be to scope out the functionality you want in as much detail as you can rather than think about the coding side whilst you get familiar with step one (IDE/Uploads etc).

From previous correspondence I understand that you have not programmed before - the learning curve is really significant to get the program skeleton in place for your autonomous yacht - but the good news there are people willing to help you achieve the result.

C-3PO

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Nordlys

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Re: Receiver and Arduino link
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2020, 10:03:09 am »

Brilliant, thank you. I've taken that all on board.
Scoping out the details of the craft, hardware and objectives in next few days.
Very glad of your assistance here.


Regards


Nord.
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