The Shipyard ( Dry Dock ): Builds & Questions > Working Vessels

Mark's "Le Rochefort" Build 1/24 Scale

(1/64) > >>

Mark T:
Time to start another build  %%


This time I'm going to try my hand at a fully framed build as I like a bit of carpentry.  I've chosen Ancre's "Le Rochefort" monograph for this build for a few reasons.


It would be easy to make my first POF build a 3 level; first class ship of the line bristling with cannon but I know my limits. 
So this vessel is a 16th century working yacht that supplied the war ships with powder.  Her build is very detailed for its work such as as fully fitted deck, water tight hatches and a floor above the keelson to keep the powder dry.  I'll try and elaborate on this sort of thing as the build moves forward.


The monograph comes with 13 fully detailed drawings so there's no drawing or lofting for me to do.  I would find this very tedious and its not my thing so its great to have it already done.  You also get a book that contains the history of the vessel and a building guide.





The drawings are quite Franky astounding in quality and so detailed they include things like the bevelling of the frames











So what does Le Rochefort look like?  She's a single masted vessel which weighed in at about 90 tons.  She was designed by Hubert Penevert and built in France at Rochefort in 1787.  She is the third known vessel built around this time bearing this name.





And fortunately for me the kit turned up OK .  I have had to guess the amount of wood required to complete her but I estimate 8 planks of wood  {-)


This Costello boxwood is just beautiful and the cost of the monograph and the wood is about that of a decent model kit





Its going to be a long build as I'm making everything this time but I'll update it as and when I can


Cheers Mark  :-)

david48:
Hi Mark
Now I see why the saw had to go back ,I hope the turn round is quick ,what band saw have you. If you make a job of this as you did the last  it will be all ok.  Happy building ,have some sort of Christmas its all a bit strange more so for you down there ,where we live finding six people is a challenge.
Merry Christmas to you both .


David

SteamboatPhil:
I will once again be watching with great interest, and again being jealous of your great woodworking skills  :-))

Mark T:

--- Quote from: david48 on December 12, 2020, 04:21:50 pm ---Hi Mark
Now I see why the saw had to go back ,I hope the turn round is quick ,what band saw have you. If you make a job of this as you did the last  it will be all ok.  Happy building ,have some sort of Christmas its all a bit strange more so for you down there ,where we live finding six people is a challenge.
Merry Christmas to you both .


David

--- End quote ---


Hi David great to hear from you mate - I have a proxxon band saw which I reckon is more than adequate for this job.  But your are right I hope I get my table saw back quickly as I feel like my best mate is missing in action.  BTW how's your Ham exams going???  Have a great Xmas Bud :)



--- Quote from: SteamboatPhil on December 12, 2020, 07:14:41 pm ---I will once again be watching with great interest, and again being jealous of your great woodworking skills  :-))

--- End quote ---


Hi Phil and thanks :). I'm very unsure how far I'm going to get with this one but I'm going to give it a go.  Its something that I've always wanted to do.....so lets try.  If it doesn't work out I'm going to build the most powerful Riva that has ever graced this planet  {-)

Mark T:
Right its time to get started  O0


I've never looked at proper ships plans before and I must admit they are confusing and very daunting.  There is so much detail its difficult to know where to start so I'm going to do what I've always done.  I'm going to break this build down into manageable chunks and start with something that I think I can do.


There are 32 frames that need to be made not including the hawse or stern timbers  :o   Some look easier than others so I have chosen the forward frames numbered 15 through to frame 4.  They are I guess what we would call standard frames that don't have riser blocks or pillows as I think they are called.


Here's a picture of frame 8 - Its made up of 10 pieces and two halves.  One half sits on the floor of the rising wood and the other sits on the half floor.  I'll try and explain this as I go along as I'm learning too





So I took 2 photocopies of each frame and coloured them in so that I can tell which frame belongs to which half





Next was the wood for the frames.  I took a plank and cut it into 3 equal lengths to make it more manageable.  The width of the wood is listed in the plans under a thing called "the scantlings".  Old world speak for list of ships timber sizes  {-)   The original frames were 189mm wide so divided by 24 for my scale, the wood needs to be 7.875mm wide.  From the supplier the wood was 8.36mm wide





So I ran each piece through a thickness sander to bring it down.  I left a bit on for final sanding





I next cut out all of the frame parts and used a Pritt stick to glue them onto the wood.  I'm making 11 frames here so there are 110 parts  :o





Yellow is for the floor and red for the half floor sides.  I've now got to get these cut out on the band saw and then sand down to the outside edge.  Its going to take a while so I'll update as and when I can


Cheers Mark  :-)

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version