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Author Topic: only for ENGINEERS  (Read 7475 times)

supersonic

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #25 on: October 29, 2007, 05:37:46 PM »

THANKS FIREBOAT  O0,
NOW ISNT THAT WHAT I SAID 24 POSTS AGO ;D

REGARDS DAVE
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Supersonics Son

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #26 on: October 29, 2007, 06:26:29 PM »

 ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::) ::)

Here we go... some rumpy old git with a shed is going to take this back to the pub now....

Its still not sorted tho. There are a few posts out there which I personaly think are true...

I think somewhere down this Thread we lost a bolt...... Its still open for discussion.... Cant spell..... Never could... What you say pops....lol   O0
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polaris

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #27 on: October 29, 2007, 06:54:53 PM »


Fireboat, coachbolts don't have nuts!!! :D
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omra85

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #28 on: October 29, 2007, 07:15:31 PM »

I definitely bought a BOLT for my back gate which I fixed on with screws and nerry a nut in sight - which given that this is a family forum - is a good job!

Bolt - A bolt is the term used for a threaded fastener, with a head, designed to be used in conjunction with a nut.

Screw - A headed threaded fastener that is designed to be used in conjunction with a pre formed internal thread or alternatively forming its own thread. Historically, it was a threaded fastener with the thread running up to the head of the fastener that has no plain shank. However this definition has largely been superseded to avoid confusion over the difference between a bolt and a screw.

Straight from
http://www.boltscience.com/pages/glossary.htm#s

Until I looked it up, I'd have sworn that a screw was threaded all the way up!  Where's my Luddite membership card  :o {-)

Danny



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Circlip

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #29 on: October 29, 2007, 07:40:43 PM »


   An when i called SWMBO a rude word I defiantly made a bolt for the door!
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chingdevil

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #30 on: October 29, 2007, 08:20:53 PM »

Fireboat a nut will fit on a Engineering Set Screw, but it is not a bolt


Brian
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supersonic

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #31 on: October 29, 2007, 08:50:06 PM »

Chingdevil, when you put a nut on an engineering set screw, an amazing thing happens !

Its SEX changes and turns instantly into a BOLT

Dave.   :D
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chingdevil

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #32 on: October 29, 2007, 08:52:52 PM »

Afraid not it is still a set screw with a nut on it ::) ::)

Brian
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supersonic

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #33 on: October 29, 2007, 09:05:18 PM »

NO, NO ,NO -- It only thinks its a screw, but by having sex with the nut,
it really is a ----    Bolt,
screwey isnt it ?

Dave.
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chingdevil

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #34 on: October 29, 2007, 09:08:20 PM »

I am afraid to ask this but what does a bolt become when you put a nut on it, other than tight ??? ??? ???

Brian
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supersonic

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #35 on: October 29, 2007, 09:16:47 PM »

Brian , exactly, You have to put a nut on it to make it become tight, which is what started this off

GOOD EH ? {-) {-)

Dave.
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meridian

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #36 on: October 29, 2007, 09:23:58 PM »

For goodness sake! Please take a look at the attached picture, it shows a small sample of Allen (Socket Head Cap) Screws that my organisation currently uses on its products. Note that in each case the thread does not go up to the head. So much for one of the definitions previously used.
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supersonic

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #37 on: October 29, 2007, 09:42:51 PM »

Hi
 Meridian, Thanks for your pic, the shank is designed to stop any lateral movement between the two parts
that you are fastening together. If the shank was threaded to the top of the screw it would allow more tolerance
for the two parts to move. By having a push fit shank it removes the possibility of movement

 O0
Dave.
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Jonty

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #38 on: October 29, 2007, 09:48:53 PM »

  The other thing that causes me real confusion (and I sell them) is carriage/coach bolts/screws. Generally, a coach bolt is taken to be a cup square bolt with a thread for a nut, whereas a carriage screw has a hex head and wood thread.

  You don't have to look very far, however, to realize that the terms are actually completely confused, even by the people who make them.

  And, if you are not very careful, we'll be into etymology and origins in Old French and Latin.
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meridian

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #39 on: October 29, 2007, 09:57:42 PM »

Hi Supersonic.

Yes, I know the purpose of an unthreaded portion of shank, but the point I was trying to make was that by definition, a screw does not necessarily have to have a thread that extends up to the head, as suggested by some people.

Cheers,

Andrew
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supersonic

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #40 on: October 29, 2007, 10:28:53 PM »

CORRECT!   O0 O0 O0 O0 O0

Supersonics Son has gone quiet, must be too much for him, or , it could be long words .

Dave {-)
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sheerline

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #41 on: October 29, 2007, 10:30:44 PM »

It is a rather strange language we speak isn't it, we SCREW bolts into things just the same way we screw woodscrews into things. If we use bolts, the thing is said to be BOLTED together and if using screws, is Screwed together. If we tend to use small 'bolts' for model engineering, we tend to call them screws but when the item is assembled, it is said to be BOLTED together.
The general trend with our language seems to imply anything with a woodscrew type thread is definately a screw. Anything with a machined thread is called a bolt.. unless it has a screwdriver slot in the top, in which case it becomes a screw!
I know this is not gospel and I don't speak as an expert by any means but this seems to be the general speak amongst most people when they request fastenerswith which to put things together.
As an aside, it is my guess that the first rotatable fastner would have been the screw and when a question was  recently put about which invention has been the most significant in mankinds history, I dont remember anyone mentioning the humble screw (bolt). Without it, none of the engineering miracles would have been created and the whole world would have fallen apart.
Just my tuppence worth.
Chris
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supersonic

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #42 on: October 29, 2007, 10:44:57 PM »

Hi Sheerline,Well said,shall we post about "rotatable fasteners" ?

Dave.
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chingdevil

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #43 on: October 29, 2007, 11:00:52 PM »

Have a look at this site
http://www.boltdepot.com/fastener-information/type-chart.aspx

You are right meridian they are called screws, but using the definition of engineering fixings bolts do not have the thread all the way to the top while screws do. As an aprentice I got many a telling off for going to the stores for a bolt and coming back with a screw

Brian
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tobyker

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #44 on: October 29, 2007, 11:21:47 PM »

Nobody has properly explained the set screw yet - it seems to be a bolt on which the thread runs up to the head. And the clockmakers seem to have done very well without screws, using pins and wedges to hold quite complex mechanisms together. And hoorah for Whitworth and the Lord Chancellor.
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FullLeatherJacket

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #45 on: October 29, 2007, 11:25:19 PM »

It's the letters what gives it away, stoopids!
B is for bolts what is Big; S is for screws what is Small.
What is you like? Din't you guys learn nuffink at school?
FLJ (B.Tech; M.Inst.Prod.Eng; M.Inst.Mech.Eng; C.Eng; ................failed da lot but I is still fightin', innit?)  O0
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sheerline

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #46 on: October 30, 2007, 08:36:20 AM »

There is another range of fasteners not listed in the engineering books, these are known by a number of different names but relate to the same thing, for example: Bluddy screws, f--k--g screws, sodding bolts and the general term used for all unyielding fasteners....'the bast-d'!!  >:( These latter types have been around since the first ever fastener was installed and found  reluctant to release. It was at this point in history that the cold chisel and hammer were invented, closely followed by the cutting torch.
It also began to dawn on young apprentices that there was indeed a god out there of whom they had no knowledge and indeed their mothers and schoolteachers had omitted from their education. ::) Only engineers and technicians knew of this greater being.... his name was f--k! They were always thankful to him when at the end of a massive struggle, the battered, bent and red hot smoking remains of a bolt was extricated from its hole because they always thanked him and lit a cigarette in his honour.. O0
I know the above to be true because I have witnessed it and practiced it all my life.
I have received the best of education, the school I went to was truly excellent.... I know this cos my Mum said it was approved!!  {-)
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meridian

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #47 on: October 30, 2007, 08:53:22 AM »

And why is it that when removing a number of screws, it's always the last one that refuses to budge?
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sheerline

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #48 on: October 30, 2007, 08:57:12 AM »

Thats the one that was born a B-st-d! ;)
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Captain Povey

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Re: only for ENGINEERS
« Reply #49 on: October 30, 2007, 08:57:50 AM »

Sods law applies to the removal of the last bolt. Can anyone define sods law?  :-\ Graham
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