Model Boat Mayhem

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Author Topic: Friendly Fire?  (Read 1775 times)

Bryan Young

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Friendly Fire?
« on: May 15, 2007, 05:36:35 pm »

Maybe you have'nt seen this one?
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Notes from a simple seaman

RickF

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Re: Friendly Fire?
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2007, 07:14:07 pm »

Ah, a 1:32 helicopter enthusiast exacting revenge on a 1:350 warship modeller!

Rick
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Bunkerbarge

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Re: Friendly Fire?
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2007, 08:19:27 pm »

In round about 1980 I was on a container ship doing a run out of Greenock across the North Atlantic.  We were asked as we left if we would be OK with the Navy doing some exercises with us, as there was some sort of strike on somewhere preventing the normal routine, which entailed dropping a sonar buoy and trying to determine as much as they could about our ship.

The accuracy they came back with was staggerring.  They knew our engine configuration and machinery layout simply from what a sonar buoy picked up from the sound we made going through the water.
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"Dirty British coaster with a salt-caked smoke stack, Butting through the Channel in the mad March days"

Bryan Young

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Re: Friendly Fire?
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2007, 11:51:47 pm »

In round about 1980 I was on a container ship doing a run out of Greenock across the North Atlantic.  We were asked as we left if we would be OK with the Navy doing some exercises with us, as there was some sort of strike on somewhere preventing the normal routine, which entailed dropping a sonar buoy and trying to determine as much as they could about our ship.

The accuracy they came back with was staggerring.  They knew our engine configuration and machinery layout simply from what a sonar buoy picked up from the sound we made going through the water.
Should have been with us (Olna) when we were shadowing "Kiev" on her maiden voyage from the Black Sea to the White Sea in the 70s. What they could do then was amazing...lord knows what "they" are capable of now!
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Notes from a simple seaman

farrow

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Re: Friendly Fire?
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2007, 09:16:14 am »

The 22 is the Beaver, commissioned 18 Dec 1984, so the photo was taken 1985 onwards. Suspect it could be the PR shot for a new passive sonar that then had just come on line. At the time was serving in the RMAS St Margarets which was then heavily involved in sonar trial plus towed array trials due to her having steam recip engines which made her as quite as the O/P class subs in quite running routine.
In 1984 we had just finished trials with a system which we called the spider, it was a 30ft diameter ali rig with about 30 hydro phones on it. The thing was put over the side and was suspended from a large buoy with bungee cord. We then steamed backwards and forwards upto 1.75 miles and .25 miles from it for days. The position was 200 miles south of Madeira, the best thing was we had an endurance of 10 days so we had 2/3 runs into Madeira for bunkers. This rig was so sensitive it could pick up ships leaving New York, the big problem was identifying sea noises like whales and calibrating for them. The chief scientist told me that the real problem was shrinking it all to fit into a passive sonar buoy to be dropped from a he-lo. Although the Pict shows I believe another expensive British weapon flop the stingray, after several billion pounds spent on R/D no one would buy it , so it was foisted onto the RN. The trouble with it I believe is that any nuc sub can outrun when submerged.
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Circlip

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Re: Friendly Fire?
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2007, 12:50:45 pm »

      I would think Bunkerbarge, that your 'Ship' had been zapped by a 'boat' long before and you were part of a
       training exercise to impress the media.
          And just a small point, who termed the expression 'Friendly Fire'?  How can it be termed friendly when it kills and maims
       ones own allies! An Americanism I suppose.
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The long Build

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Re: Friendly Fire?
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2007, 01:39:11 pm »

Explanation of Friendly Fire (Wikiepedia) so take with a pinch of salt..

Due to the number of UK personnel killed by U.S. forces, in Britain the term 'friendly fire' is used in a semi-ironic way to imply U.S. Military incompetence

TLB
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Circlip

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Re: Friendly Fire?
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2007, 04:38:16 pm »


       Overheard in the mess once, ' In WW2 when the British opened fire the Germans took cover,when the Germans
       opened fire the British and Americans took cover and when the Americans opened fire every b3gger took cover.'
             Some things never change.
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You might not like what I say, but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.
 
What I said is not what you  think you heard.

bigford

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Re: Friendly Fire?
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2007, 10:20:09 pm »

american marine motto KILL THEM ALL LET GOD SORT THEM OUT!!!
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