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Author Topic: The Lady T  (Read 29933 times)

Tug-Kenny

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #125 on: May 16, 2008, 07:33:02 PM »


Now that does look good.

I'll bet your a happy chappie.  O0 O0

Ken
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footskijunior

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #126 on: May 19, 2008, 06:52:01 AM »

Hola,

Looking very nice Dad, agree with the non-brush painting of the hull, however the Garnock had a good finish?

Just a thought - may be out of depth here, but is there any anodes on the plan? Not sure if they even had them in 1890.... Never mind, its very early and William has had me up since 5am!!


Keep it up,

Junior
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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #127 on: May 19, 2008, 07:25:43 PM »

Having followed the advice of Stavros, I now have the hull colour on and drying nicely.....Six coats of red, but I have a finish that  am quite pleased with.

Whilst waiting for the paint to dry and having cut all the holes in the box for Actions P94, I decided to make the anchor davit. Fairly easy to do using thick brass rod and making up the single blocks. The hook was made from thin brass rod. When painted it doesn't look half bad.

Also got on with the 4 sets of bollards, made from 6 mm wide brass strip and brass tubing topped with clear plastic discs that were originally port hole windows from an old kit model. Having run out of brass tube, I substituted aluminium tube of the same size. Should be fine when painted and they are not load bearing.

Junior.........No no anodes on this one...
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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #128 on: May 22, 2008, 10:41:11 AM »

Next to do was the black on the upper hull. I masked everything off using anything that was available......Swmbo not too impressed at another ruined sheet though...Three coats of paint applied and the masking removed within a few minutes. Then came the scary part.....Washed my hands and using Stavros's technique, rubbed a finger along the masking line.....It worked!! {-). Flattened the edge down a treat. The photo does not show it very well though..

That Stavros certainly knows his stuff and for all you newcomers out there don't be afriad to follow his advise....

Barry
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Voyager

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #129 on: May 22, 2008, 11:05:33 AM »

Say...that's coming along nicely Footski  O0 I bet you are pleased you went with the cans now rather than hand painting.

Voyager
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GaryM

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #130 on: May 22, 2008, 11:42:16 PM »

Beautiful paint job!
How do you get the straight line?

regards
Gary :)
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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #131 on: May 23, 2008, 07:56:55 AM »

Beautiful paint job!
How do you get the straight line?

regards
Gary :)
Thanks Gary.
In this case the water line is not easy as the hull is not level (horizontal) anywhere so I used the plan and measured from the top rubbing strake down to the line at regular intervals on the plan and transferred the measurement to the hull using a soft pencil. Then I used an expensive insulation tape through the pencil marks to get the finished edge, which I then checked using a thin and very straight piece of steel. After a little fine adjustment it was ready for painting. The good tape prevented any bleed from the black paint...
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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #132 on: May 24, 2008, 01:38:32 PM »

FIRST "SEA" TRIALS.....

Okay time to try her on the water and first results were very encouraging. She floats a little high at the stern, but other than that didn't look too bad.

The P94 worked superbly well. The control over the model is unlike anything I have had before and this was straight out of the box and first test....

Only one problem, the port motor starts to turn before the starboard one, in both directions and the model pushes to starboard when going forward. it moves in a perfectly straight line going astern. ANY IDEAS WHY AND HOW TO CORRECT IT?. The wiring for both motors is the same and just about the same length...
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Roger in France

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #133 on: May 24, 2008, 04:09:48 PM »

Looks good Barry.

Sorry not a clue about your problem.

Is your pool chlorine or salt? Mine is salt and so I am not keen to run boats on it for long. Not had a swim yet this year, water temp is still only 17 after our long cold, wet spring.

Roger in France.
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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #134 on: May 24, 2008, 04:39:58 PM »

Hi Roger,
Not my pool, don't have one and don't want one....More trouble than they are worth, plus I have the use of all the neighbours, which are chlorine, not salt. Water temperature now about 23 degrees so very swimmable....


Anyway the "thick plottens". I have swopped the wiring for the motors to the opposite sides on the P94 and this time it is the starboard motor that starts first and amintains a higher speed than the port......have a head ache now.....
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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #135 on: May 24, 2008, 08:02:03 PM »

Headache gone now.........A simple adjustment to the esc's and all is well. great piece of kit that P94

Go BUY ONE....You know you want too...
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footskijunior

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #136 on: May 25, 2008, 01:30:04 PM »

Looks good dad, can't find fault with it!

Tug boats do tend to ride high, as they 'dig in' when towing. Most that I have seen ride with the waterline out of the water (about 5% - ish) of the loadline draft.

Will write more tonight, BBQ now.

Mark
 and william
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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #137 on: May 29, 2008, 09:25:43 AM »

Steam Windlass....

I have now put together the Steam windlass, which after careful consideration of scratch building, decided to buy one from MMM.

I first of all cleaned up the parts and after panting with a couple of coats of gloss green, with some Matt black parts I put it together. Then came the hard part and the bit I would welcome constructive criticism on...I weathered it, after all this is not a very well run Tug....My son Footskijunior (who is Chief Mate on tankers in the Caribbean) is the skipper tut tut...

Firstly I used my black milk technique to get the edges, corners and crannies looking dirty. Then I applied some "steel" by dry brushing and then, rusting powder. Finally I sealed it all in with a coat of clear varnish. The combination of black milk and the rust powder helps to take the shine off the gloss, but in places leaves just a little of it showing through...Photo one shows it before the rust was added.

Now as I am here to learn, is there a better way to do all that?. If so please let me know....I can try a new technique on the capstan and other parts...
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footskijunior

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #138 on: May 29, 2008, 09:33:16 AM »

Hi dad,
A quickie.... Not sure if it applies but you never know..

Most steam appliances are painted with either a black or silver paint, as most other paints melt off with the heat.

Lucky my windlasses are hydraulic.

Mark
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GaryM

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #139 on: May 29, 2008, 11:48:45 PM »

Hi Barry - looks pretty good to me :)

What's "black milk," "steel" & "rusting powder"? 
I want to weather my boat and any help would be a great help - I don't want the boat looking as if she had just tasted water.

regards
Gary
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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #140 on: May 30, 2008, 08:49:11 AM »

Hi Barry - looks pretty good to me :)

What's "black milk," "steel" & "rusting powder"? 
I want to weather my boat and any help would be a great help - I don't want the boat looking as if she had just tasted water.

regards
Gary

Hi Gary,
Black milk is a mix of milk and black emulsion paint. Added liberally to any pre painted and even varnished surface and allowed to either fully or partially dry. Then using a damp cloth, wipe it off. You will not be able to shift it all as some will remain in the cracks and joints. If not happy with the results, wash it off with water and a brush....It gives a geat effect and when fully dried can be varnished over to seal it.

The steel, is simply a steel coloured paint that is dry brushed onto the object to give the effect of the paint wearing off.

As for the rusting powders, they are an assortment of coloured powders from light rust colour to very dark, simply choose the colour you want and apply by brush vigorously. Blow away any excess and you have rust. Again it can be washed off if not happy. Varnish over to seal.

A little practice helps.

If you want more info....PM me..
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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #141 on: June 07, 2008, 03:20:32 PM »

Figures...

A difficult one this as painting figures is not something I do very often. Still having posted a specific thread o the subject and had some very useful replies, I have finished the figures......Not the best in the world but as stand-off viewing they are okay...

Next I will think about the boats.....Then i will think again about the boats and worry about them before starting them.....No idea which way to go with them yet, but will do some research first..
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Tug-Kenny

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #142 on: June 09, 2008, 11:37:16 AM »


Lovely finishing touch. Well done, they look super.

Ken
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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #143 on: June 13, 2008, 10:46:25 AM »

IDENTITY.

The tug now has its formal name....Many thanks to Mike from Canada (tugs53), who sent me the lettering over. A truely kind gesture on his part and together with the advice he gave me, resulted in the finished article.
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footskijunior

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #144 on: June 14, 2008, 06:12:31 PM »

that bloke on the back looks like me - hardly working!!
Looking good dad, keep it up.
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footskijunior

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #145 on: June 22, 2008, 08:38:56 AM »

donde the stern lights?
 ???
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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #146 on: June 22, 2008, 09:10:46 AM »

donde the stern lights?
 ???

Atop the main mast!!!
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footskijunior

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #147 on: June 23, 2008, 07:42:43 PM »

what the stern lights doing on top of da main mast????

stern lights should be placed "as close to the stern as practicable" and have an arc of visibilty from dead astern to 22.5 degrees abaft the beam on each side...


still remember.

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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #148 on: June 23, 2008, 08:01:52 PM »

I didn't know you were that old! {-)!! In 1890 when this Tug was made they were placed high up, in this case a few feet from the top of the main mast.... O0..
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barryfoote

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Re: The Lady T
« Reply #149 on: June 27, 2008, 06:19:43 PM »

More finishing touches have been added now. figures all secured and the steam capstan made and installed. importantly she has had her final ballast test in the bath and over the weekend I hope to get her into the water for a prper run.

Still got plenty to do....rigging....ships boats....finish towbow and add the weathering touch to the hull.
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