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Author Topic: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird  (Read 36183 times)

John W E

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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #25 on: December 28, 2007, 01:36:14 PM »

The next stage after this is to ensure that the rudder servo works correctly and you are happy with it.   The motor runs correctly and you are happy with that.  As soon as you are entirely happy that everything inside the hull is working correctly, progress onwards to fitting the deck.

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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #26 on: December 28, 2007, 01:38:49 PM »

This is where you have to be on good terms with the lady of the house.  I made the deck from 2mm lite ply for this model and the procedure was to place the sheet of lite ply on the bed and then turn the hull upside down on top of the lite ply and press down hard, so that the ply bends into shape of the deck of the hull.  Draw around the outside of the hull onto the ply (not onto the bed).  :)  We then proceed to cut this out, leaving 3-4 mm plus on the line we have drawn.

The next stage is to set the hull square on the building stand and then apply glue to the tops of all of the frames and the deck edge.   Then apply a couple of bits of cellotape to ensure that the deck is pulled around the edges and then apply weights onto the top of the deck – as you can see in the photograph.    Set this aside to fully dry.

Once the deck is fully dried and the weights have been removed :) the next stage is to sand the excess material off the deck.   So that the deck is now flush with the sides of the hull and to the correct shape.   For the deck material I used 2mm lite ply as this bends a lot easier than 1/16 ply as the hull has a fair rake from bow to stern and also a good camber across the deck.   The lite ply formed to this shapes easier.   
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #27 on: December 28, 2007, 01:45:21 PM »

The next stage in the construction should be to mark a centre line all the way down the deck, from bow to stern.

This is where we refer to the plan and now we need to mark a reference point on the centre line to take all measurements from for superstructures and items on the deck.   I normally use either the aft end of the main superstructure as the location point or the forward end of the superstructure.  In this case I used the forward end of the main superstructure as my main reference point.   I obtained the overall length of the main superstructure plus engine casing and marked this length and width out onto the deck, using measurements from the plan.  Then, I decided what area needs to be opened up to gain access into the inside of the hull and in this case it could be all of the marked out area.    So, I redrew a line ⅛” inboard around the line I had drawn which represents the extreme exterior of the superstructure.  You may remove this area at this time, but I opted to leave it until a later date to remove.   

The next stage in the build is to mark out the bulwark supports and to apply the bulwarks.  The bulwarks are going to be made out of 1/16 ply and the support pins are going to be made out of 1/16 brass or copper rod.

First of all, we draw a line parallel around the outside of the deck edge 1/32 of an inch inboard of the deck edge. 1/32 is 1/16 thickness of plywood for bulwark and ½ the diameter of the pin which in our case 1/16 pin = 1/32.   We then start at the bow; using our plan as a reference, mark the spacing of the bulwark upright supports onto the deck edge on the line we have drawn, both sides of the hull.   Then, we must make a jig up out of small piece of scrap ply; this jig will give us the overall height of the bulwark pins which must be at least level with the height of the bulwark or 1/16 below the height of the bulwark, also the angle of the bulwark pins.

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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #28 on: December 28, 2007, 01:47:38 PM »

The next stage then, is to drill /16 holes through the deck to accommodate the pins.   We ensure that we DO NOT drill through the side of the hull TIME AND PATIENCE MUST BE USED HERE.   I do one pin at a time, drilling and gluing into position and then bending to the correct angle, working all my way from the bow to the stern on one side and then do the opposite side afterwards.   Once we have fitted all the pins and glued them in and double checked our angle and the heights, we move onwards to the next stage which is actually the manufacture of the bulwarks.

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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #29 on: December 28, 2007, 01:51:36 PM »

On this particular hull the most difficult part to produce is the stern piece, for this I made up a template from cardboard.   The cardboard I had was from the inside of a new shirt packet – but an old cornflakes/cereal box cardboard would do.   

I bent this around the stern so it became into contact with all of the pins around the stern, as can be seen by the photograph.    I temporarily cellotaped this into place, and, with a pencil I marked onto the cardboard around the deck edge, giving me the perfect profile (or near enough the perfect profile of the deck where the cardboard comes into contact).

I then cut the line out on the cardboard and tried it against the hull to ensure that it fitted correctly.  The next stage was, on the cardboard template, to mark off the bulwark overall height, plus at least ⅛ of an inch.

This new line you are drawing runs parallel with the line that you have cut, at the deck edge.   Now you have cut this piece template out and retry it out against the bulwark pins on the model at the stern.   Satisfied that there are minimum gaps and it sits nice and neatly transfer this cardboard template shape onto a piece of 1/16 ply.

Now when we transfer this onto the plywood, ensure that the grain of the plywood runs vertical – in other words the grain runs up the height of the bulwark.  This facilitates for easy bending.   I cut this shape out of the 1/16 ply and soaked it in boiling water for at least 20 minutes.    I then clamped it to the bulwark pins at the rear of the model in position.  This was allowed to dry out in place.

With superglue, I then glued the stern bulwark section to the pins and the deck and allowed it to dry thoroughly.   The next stage is to do the side portions and the bow section.   First of all I clamped a length of 1/16 ply to the outside of hull so that at least the height of the bulwark plus ⅛ was above deck level.   I then drew around the inside marking the deck edge and shape onto the inside of the plywood.   Cut this out – and glue it to the pins and deck of the side of the hull.    I followed this procedure through until I had completed both sides of the hull up to the bow.   Then I allowed it to dry.

The next stage, I made a little height gauge up so that I could mark off on the inside the bulwarks the overall height.  I proceeded to mark a line all around the insides of the bulwarks at the correct height.    I then carefully sanded with a variety of sanding blocks and sandpaper to achieve the correct height of the bulwarks.

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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #30 on: December 28, 2007, 01:53:21 PM »

.... more pics of the assembly of the bulwark  ;D
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #31 on: December 28, 2007, 01:55:44 PM »

I proceeded to mark off the water freeing ports in the side of the bulwarks.   On this model I am going to have them slightly open to allow for drainage for water from the deck – so you will see I have cut them all out.  I used a brand new scalpel blade and a steel rule, cutting one freeing port at a time.   A tip here: If like mine, you have a joint right next to where you are going to cut a freeing port, clamp a piece of wood behind the joint so you are not putting any undue stress on the joint whilst you are cutting through.

When I had finished cutting all the freeing ports out and sanded and cleaned them up, this is the stage that I removed the centre section of the deck, thus allowing me access to the inside of the  hull.

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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #32 on: December 28, 2007, 01:58:20 PM »

Once I had cut out the area I wanted to be removed to gain access into the hull, I needed to put a combing around it.

First of all, I glued underneath the deck ¼ inch square softwood, level with the edge opening of the deck all the way around the opening.

The height of the combing depends on the personal choice and where the model is going to be sailed.  If you are going to sail it in the lakes of Wales, I would recommend the combing to be at least 1 inch above deck level – because remember this is the only thing which will stop the water entering the hull.

In my particular case the combing is the average of about ½ inch high.  This was made out of 1/16 ply – glued to the inside and the face of the ¼ inch support pieces I had glued underneath the deck.   The corners of the combings were supported with Obechi timber just to add strength.   

Now, it’s just a case of going over the hull – light standing and filling in bits and pieces and basically we have now finished the hull!  {-)

The next stage is obviously superstructure and fittings.   

I wish to do this at a separate topic to follow on from this one.
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #33 on: December 28, 2007, 02:00:27 PM »

As a footnote – there are several unanswered points  :)

I have never mentioned ballasting the model or calculating its weight.  This is my personal preference – to do this at the end – or at this stage now, where I can put it in the test tank (the bath  :) ) with no fittings or superstructure to be knocked off or damaged and I can play around with a variety of weights until I get it right.

The second thing is when to fit the motor and also steering servo.   There are several schools of thought on this subject, all schools are correct in their own way.   Some people prefer to completely finish the model and then fit the running gear, as we will call it, being if it has to come out – you can get it out quite easily and refit it – in the space that they have provided.

Whereas I like to fit the motor and running gear whilst doing the build when the hull has no deck on it, and the reason for this, is, I have plenty of room to work around inside the hull with no fear of damaging any fittings and so forth, when things go wrong. (That blinking motor doesn’t fit)  :)

I hope you have enjoyed, and understand what I have been trying to explain.   

Aye
John E
Bluebird.


 


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John W E

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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #34 on: December 30, 2007, 08:34:00 PM »

Hi there one and all, a quick sneek preview of the progress of the superstructure build - more to follow - do you think the funnel looks a bit 'odd' - its off the drawing, but looks odd to me.  Right to the drawing as I say.

aye
john e
bluebird
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #35 on: January 03, 2008, 07:23:45 PM »

SUPERSTRUCTURE BUILD FOR THE TUG CERVIA

A little pause for thought first; at this stage, we have several options open to us and the options are purely a personal choice.   Where do we take our build from here – some modellers prefer to build a model as near as perfect as one can get; some modellers like myself on certain plans like to build the model as depicted on the plan, and, some modellers like to build a ‘stand off’ version.

We will look at the choices on merit; let then take the first one:

•   We want to build a model as close as we can to the ‘prototype vessel’ as possible.   In this case we have to put our Sherlock Holmes’ cap on – we have to do a lot of investigation and research on the vessel’s history, design, alterations throughout its life, because a vessel is not known as a ‘she’ for nothing.   Like a typical woman; she changes her clothes and appearance on a regular basis.  ;D   

We have to decide at what period of time we are going to represent our model; and, having picked a particular time, we have to amass as much information about that vessel with regard to its fittings, structural alterations and so forth – this enables us to build a good representation of that particular vessel.   This can not only be very time consuming, but also very costly.    The plans we are using for the tug Cervia, no doubt, fairly accurate – I have noticed one or two discrepancies when looking at photographs of her.   To give you an example – on the back end of the engine room top deck casing – on the photographs I have – show a rear door access point to the engine room.  Now then, on the plans this is not shown.    On the plan it shows radar – now the time she had radar fitted the doors were fitted to the engine room casing.   This could have been an oversight by the draughtsman; however, it just highlights one small problem we have to overcome when trying to build a replica of a particular vessel.

Although building a model to exact scale can be very rewarding, in more ways than one.   It can be also be very stressful.    The last point really is if we had decided to build an exact replica, we would have decided this at the very beginning of the build so we would not then come across problems:

•   To build straight from a plan - I prefer this option at times.  To build like this can give you some leeway when you have not got the correct information for particular parts of the build, e.g. full information on steam windlasses and so forth.   You can build off the plan what you see and it should give a reasonable representation of the item or, if you wish, you can purchase a fitting which is near enough what has been drawn on the plan.   We also can afford to be a little bit lenient on the quality of our build – this is because every modeller suffers the same – some good days when everything goes right and looks well and some days when everything goes terribly wrong.   ::)

•   To build a stand-off model – there is nothing wrong with this type of build – IT PLEASES THE BUILDER if he doesn’t like the particular bridge which is on the plan, he can make his own up.    If one wants to put something on the tug/vessel that was never there on the original one can.

AT THE END OF THE DAY the real answer to all questions has to be the enjoyment we gain from building the model, and, the enjoyment we gain from sailing it. 
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #36 on: January 03, 2008, 07:27:00 PM »

If we move on and look into the superstructure build of the Cervia, or indeed any superstructure build for any vessel; on close inspection we will see that superstructures are built up of oblong/rectangular/square shaped boxes, half round shapes, circular shapes.   The majority of superstructures tend to build up of box shapes.

Okay, so enough of my waffling!

Let us take a look back at the plan of the Cervia.  We can break the superstructure down into three basic parts. 

Here is a little tip: When studying plans of any vessel, sometimes those lines can become very confusing and you find it difficult to follow a particular line.  So what I do is lay a couple of sheets of plain A4 paper, to cover sections of the plan. This obscures those lines which are distracting me and then, I can focus on the area I am working on from the Plan.

1.   The main superstructure at deck level an oblong box with a rounded front end; behind the main superstructure it steps down towards where the tow hook is and either side of that there are coaling hatches.   That is another small rectangular box and behind that going aft, there is the engine room casing (skylight casing) - another rectangular box, only this time it has a curved roof.   On top of the main superstructure, we have the bridge – that is another square box structure but, this time it has a front end which is made up like three sides of a hexagon.   This forms the bridge front.    Behind the bridge, we have the funnel which is an oval shape; then masts and on top of the bridge we have a ‘flying bridge’ which is basically an open box.  So, all we are constructing then are basically five boxes. 

So we will make a start; in the photograph you will see I have traced from the plan the side profile of the main superstructure and transferred this to 1/32 ply.  I then cut two sides out, port and starboard.   On this particular plan there are no front or back elevations. 

I had to take the width of the superstructure from the deck profile plan.  Also, I had to take the height from the side profile.  This gave me two dimensions to calculate the size for the rear of the superstructure.     

I also traced off the deck profile, the radius’ of the front of the superstructure and this in turn was transferred to 1/16 ply – these became formers for me to bend 1/64 ply around to create the front radius on the main superstructure.  This is all shown on photograph 1.    The last thing I did was trace out what we will call ‘the boat deck’ – this is the roof of the main superstructure that the lifeboat, funnel and bridge are mounted on.

The first stage of the build was take some
6 x 1.5 mm Obechi and glue it along the bottom edge of the side that is going to become the main superstructure.

I did the same with the front edge of the superstructure; I then repeated this operation on the opposite side.   I then took the back section of the superstructure and glued onto that 5mm square balsa wood on the inside edge.   I did the same on the front bulkhead.  I assembled all four pieces together and this created an oblong box – without a roof.   
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #37 on: January 03, 2008, 07:31:21 PM »

The next stage in the build was to glue the two semi-circular formers which I had cut out of 1/16 ply and glue them on the front of the superstructure – gluing in 5mm square balsa wood in the corners.  This supports the joints.

I then wrapped a piece of 1/64 plywood around the formers and glued it to either side of the superstructure.   I allowed this to dry.

Once it was dry I sanded and trimmed the 1/64 ply to the correct height and blended it in to the sides of the superstructure with the aid of P38 filler.   Once I had completed this, I moved on to glue the boat deck (roof) onto the main superstructure.

When this had all dried; it was placed onto the model and a line was scribed all the way around where the superstructure meets the deck.  This gave me the deck profile to which I was to sand the bottom of the superstructure so that it fitted snugly to the deck.

Once I had finished this, I moved on to make the smaller rectangular box which is where the coaling hatches and tow hook are; this structure was made in a similar manner to the main structure.

The third part of the main structure, the engine room top deck casing or skylight was made in much the same manner.   This time though the roof is curved.  This again was made from a basic box section shape.  This time though, the ends of the box section shape had a radiused top section, which in turn produced a curved roof.   All of these structures are made from 1/32 ply.   

When we have finished gluing and the glue has dried I give the main superstructure two coats of sand ‘n sealer inside and out.   Then we give it a light sanding to finish off.
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #38 on: January 03, 2008, 07:33:38 PM »

We move on now to construct the wheelhouse. This sits on top of the main superstructure.  Although on the plan there is no front elevation to show sizes of windows or quantity of windows in the wheelhouse; there is a plan view, of the wheelhouse showing location of the windows in the bridge.

So, using the profile plan of the wheelhouse, along with the plan view, I was able to work out the size and number of windows.  :)  Plus, I was also able to obtain two or three photographs on the web & one from a friend, these photographs show the wheelhouse and windows.

So, all the items required to make up the wheelhouse were drawn out onto 1/32 plywood.   The first items I cut out were the windows and doors.  When I was satisfied that all the windows and doors were square I cut the main shape of the wheelhouse out of the plywood.   The reason I cut the windows out first, was to prevent splitting.  This is because on certain windows – they are very close to the edge of the door and corners of the wheelhouse.

As you can see from the photographs, I began at the aft-end of the wheelhouse, gluing and erecting the vertical sides and moving onwards to the front.   When I had finished this – this again was coated with two coats of sand ‘n sealer inside and out – and then set aside.
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #39 on: January 03, 2008, 07:36:20 PM »

The next item I made was the ‘thing the smoke comes out of’ you know what I mean the ‘chuff chuff’ aye the chimney pot ……erm THE FUNNEL.   {-)

There are lots of ways to construct funnels – we can make them from solid balsa, plastic tubing (if you have the right shape and diameter).  This particular funnel is oval shaped and I decided to fabricate it out of plywood. 

So, I needed to trace from the side profile plan:-

•   The overall height and width of the funnel
•   The angle it sits on the deck at

I needed to get the oval shape from the deck profile plan.

The procedure I used was as follows:-

I traced the overall height and width of the funnel profile onto 1/16 ply and I cut this out.

I then traced three ovals – two onto 1/16 ply and one onto 1/32 ply.   These were then cut out.

The 1/32 oval had the inner section removed to make facilitate the opening of the inner funnel (smaller oval).

One of the ovals that was cut from the 1/16 ply was cut into half; these then are the pieces so far and now for the assembly:

The solid 1/16 oval was glued centrally to the vertical funnel profile which is in 1/16.  The 1/16 oval that had been split into half/two was glued ¾ of the way up the height of the funnel – one either side.  The one oval with the hole in the centre which was made from 1/32 ply was glued on the top.

At the leading edge of the funnel there were four strips of ¼ square balsa wood glued, two either side of the vertical profile.  This was repeated on the back end of the funnel.

These were then sanded to the same radiuses as the funnel.  This then was wrapped and glued in 1/64 plywood.  All of this was taped up with masking tape to hold the plywood tightly onto the former and set aside to dry.   Once it had dried; we sanded and blended in the joint where the 1/64 plywood had lapped over and also we sanded the funnel to height both top and bottom.   I then added two copper rings – one at the extreme top of the funnel and one ¼ of the way down.  These were soldered and glued on.

This was set aside – and we went back to the main superstructure.

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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #40 on: January 03, 2008, 07:37:49 PM »

..... and - of the assembly of the funnel - it has been dressed off and we have coated it with sand'n sealer  O0
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #41 on: January 03, 2008, 07:39:49 PM »

We marked out the location (FOR THE PORTHOLES YA NAR – OR ROOND WINDAZ) alright then port lights  ;) wye aye man.

These were then pilot drilled using a 2mm drill.  Then, rather than using a drill for the correct size of port light – I opted to use a rounded file.   I actually use three files – a very small jeweller’s round file to start with, then open it up again gradually using a ¼” rounded file.    Eventually opening it up with a 3/8” rounded file and I don’t force the file through the hole – as in back and forward motion – I rotate the file as you would do with a drill.   The reason I use a file rather than a drill on fine ply wood is:

a)   If anyone has ever tried to drill thin plywood or thin material without clamping it, or drilling through a thicker material to support it first – you will find you don’t get a true round hole – it turns out more like the shape of a 50 pence piece.   

b)   Also, when you try and drill ply wood you tend to split the first veneer and the back veneers as the drill breaks through – you will find that by using a small file (although taking longer) you will achieve a far neater hole in the ply wood with very little splitting of the veneers.

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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #42 on: January 03, 2008, 07:41:36 PM »

The next stage was to make the port light inserts – these contain the glass.  The rims were made from brass tubing cut into approximately 4mm lengths the faces were filed flat and the burs were removed.   

I then rolled a piece of ‘plasticine’ out onto a piece of wood – like a flat pancake shape.   I made sure that the face of it was smooth with no marks at all.   I then gently pressed the brass inserts into the plasticine at about 1mm depth keeping the edge of the brass ring level and I mixed some clear epoxy resin and filled all of the brass inserts up with the mixed epoxy – I set these aside and allowed them to set.

When the epoxy had set, I removed the brass rings from the plasticine.   The epoxy is slightly recessed about 1mm back from the brass ring.  This gives a recessed glass effect for a port light.
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #43 on: January 03, 2008, 07:45:55 PM »

Whilst I was waiting for the epoxy to set in the port light glasses I moved on to the next task which was to go back to the hull.

I cut the holes for the anchor hawsers.  I first took the measurements from the plan for both the location and the sizes of the hawser pipe, where it comes out of the hull at the side.   I made a paper template up, to correspond with these; and like every builder – I forgot to take a photograph  -  but basically it was just a cardboard template with a cross marked on it – that sat against underneath the deck rubbing strake on the outside of the hull and came flush with the bow.  I drilled a small pilot hole where the cross was on the cardboard template - into the hull and moved the template onto the opposite side of the hull and repeated this process.  I was then left with two pilot holes marked on the outside of the hull  (one either side).

I took measurements then from the deck plan, for the deck location of the hawsers.  I marked these off accordingly on the deck of the model and drilled two pilot holes in the appropriate place.    I then reverted back to my needle file, passed the needle file through one of the pilot holes on the deck, rotating the file, opening up the hole until it met with the corresponding hole in the side of the hull.   Once I had opened the holes up to the width of the needle files; by gently rotating the file like a drill; I moved on up to a larger sized file.   I repeated the same operations once again.    One of the photographs you will see I use a tap wrench handle to aid me in turning the file through the hole.   The hole then was opened up to take a length of 8 mm (outside diameter) brass tube.   This brass tube was then passed through the two holes and then epoxied into place.

When the epoxy had set, I dressed the brass tube off, flush with the outside of the hull and flush with the deck with the aid of a Minicraft Drill and a sanding disc.   I repeated the operation yet again for the opposite side of the hull; leaving me with two hawser pipes.    The next stage in the hawser pipe assembly was to make the outside oval ring, which protects the plating.   This was manufactured from copper wire; round nosed pliers, and side cutters.   When I had finished the oval protection ring, it was tried against the plan for size and located and glued onto the side of the hull.   I made two – one for portside and one for starboard side.   

I moved on and made the hawser bonnet; this fits onto the deck.   It was made from copper wire and plasticard. You can see this in the photograph.
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #44 on: January 03, 2008, 07:50:21 PM »

The next stage was to camouflage the brass support pins around the bulwarks.  This is done by cutting strips of plasticard 3mm wide by 1mm thick.   These strips are now cut to the height of the bulwark and then glued over the top of the brass pin.   They now therefore represent the uprights that support the bulwarks on a ‘life size’ ship.

As you can see from now, a lot of the main superstructure work has now been completed; what happens now is everything we make is either a fitting that we add to the hull or the superstructure.   

I propose therefore to finish this topic off by posting posts of the build as I move on making the fittings, rather than putting it in a one-block form.

Lot easier for me  :)  and a lot easier for one and all to read and respond  :D

Aye
John e
Bluebird



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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #45 on: January 05, 2008, 02:21:48 PM »

CERVIA FIXTURES AND FITTINGS

A new day; fresh start; fresh problems to solve  ::)

A lot of fixtures and fittings can be bought off the shelf and there is nothing wrong with purchasing fixtures and fittings for model boats.

Some, though, we may wish to make ourselves; this is entirely up to the person and is your own choice.   I like to make my own fittings sometimes, but, occasionally I do buy some.

For the Cervia, we are going to try and make as many fittings as possible and where I am commencing is going back to the Freeing ports in the bulwarks.   
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #46 on: January 05, 2008, 02:25:52 PM »

The first fitting I am going to start with are the storm bars across the freeing ports.  Although these are not shown on the drawing, they will be there on the ‘life sized tug’.  They are a safety device fitted to the real ships, and these prevent items and people being washed overboard through the openings of the storm ports.   On some vessels these are quite large, in fact large enough for a man to be washed through in heavy weather – and that is why there are storm bars.     They are quite easily made and are just lengths of stretched ‘bell-wire’ across the openings, glued into place.   When I had completed installing these across all of the wash port openings, I gave the inside and the deck a coat of primer paint.   
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #47 on: January 05, 2008, 02:30:07 PM »

Whilst the paint was drying I moved on to the next item; the eyelets which are located just above the engine room port lights.  These again are made out of slightly thicker copper wire which have been wrapped around a brass tube as a former, to form a spring.   The copper spring was then cut to produce circles of copper wire.  These circles were then slightly flattened in a vice across the width of the copper wire to produce a flat circle. These were then cut into half;  so, one circle made two eyelets.

The next procedure was to make a small jig up from two pieces of brass tube.  One brass tube fits snuggly into the port light hole in the engine room casing, where the eyelets are going to be fitted, and, the other tube slides over the top of the first tube and sits on the outside of the engine room casing.

The segment of eyelet is then placed against the engine room casing, see photograph – it’s then glued into place with superglue.  The jig is then removed and you will see that the eyelet is set at the correct gap from the port light hole. When dry and the excess superglue (which can’t be helped) is then sanded off ALONG WITH FINGERPRINTS  ;D I then gave them an undercoating of paint. 

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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #48 on: January 05, 2008, 02:35:02 PM »

Whilst the engine room superstructure was drying, I moved back to the freeing ports on the bulwarks on the main hull.   I had decided to make these a ‘fixed’ item, but to fix them slightly open, to allow drainage of water from the main decks.

The doors themselves are made from Plasticard which are cut and shaped to fit into the freeing port opening; I then placed a packing piece of timber of about 3mm square behind the bottom edge of the freeing port door, wedging it open.  I then applied superglue to the top edge, locating it to the bulwarks.   

After I had finished inserting all the freeing port doors around the hull, I moved on to make ‘false’ hinges.  These again were made from plasticard, only this time I used a strip 2mm wide x 0.5mm thick.  This was then glued onto the freeing port door and on to the bulwark side onto the correct position.   To actually assimilate the hinge piece; I cut short lengths of stretched bell wire AGAIN and glued this into the appropriate position to assimilate the hinge knuckle.
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Re: TUG CERVIA HULL BUILD by Bluebird
« Reply #49 on: January 05, 2008, 02:43:59 PM »

What I have forgotten to mention and I will put it in here – one of the jobs I did previous to installing the storm bars – was to cut and fit the edge capping that goes around the top of the bulwarks.   There are two sections to this; a piece of plasticard 3mm wide x 0.5mm thick which runs around the outside edge at the top of the bulwark, this represents the plate stiffening; and the actually capping itself which was made from 0.5mm thick x 4mm wide plasticard and this was glued on the actual top of the bulwark.  I used plasticard here, because it can be bend and moulded with the aid of your fingers and some hot water, to form the tight radius’ which are at the stern of the vessel & the bow with ease.
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