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Author Topic: How do you? re ropes lying coiled in perfect circles on the deck  (Read 8276 times)

Bunkerbarge

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Re: How do you? re ropes lying coiled in perfect circles on the deck
« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2006, 11:17:59 AM »

Having been at sea now for thirty years I can safely say I have never seen a perfectly spiralled coil of rope on a deck.

All the ropes I have ever encountered are stored on the deck on duckboards or pallets, to keep them off the wet deck, and are coiled around and piled up in a neat oval shape.  A flat spiral of rope would never have enough length to reach the quay so I would only expect to see them on such vessels as a yacht.
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Shipmate60

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Re: How do you? re ropes lying coiled in perfect circles on the deck
« Reply #26 on: December 01, 2006, 01:26:30 PM »

Hi Bunkerbarge,
Our Tugs coil the ropes a lot ready for next use.
But if going to sea they are put away in the Bosuns Store.

Bob
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Bunkerbarge

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Re: How do you? re ropes lying coiled in perfect circles on the deck
« Reply #27 on: December 01, 2006, 04:22:59 PM »

Bob,  Thanks for the addition.  Is that coiled in a flat spiral on the deck then or coiled in a pile?
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Shipmate60

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Re: How do you? re ropes lying coiled in perfect circles on the deck
« Reply #28 on: December 01, 2006, 06:52:53 PM »

On some of the tugs the mate used to go mad if they werent tidy, others couldnt care less.
Depends on the crew.

Bob
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periscope

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Re: How do you? re ropes lying coiled in perfect circles on the deck
« Reply #29 on: December 03, 2006, 01:25:32 PM »

If you don't have a model shop nearby to get rope from - call in a local DIY hardware store and get picture frame hanging cord - it comes in all sizes and looks ok on deck.  If you don't have a local hardware store - hmmm well.......
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Captain Jack

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Re: How do you? re ropes lying coiled in perfect circles on the deck
« Reply #30 on: October 10, 2007, 03:06:04 AM »

GAWD! I had to jump in here on this thread! Not trying to be snooty or anything, but being an old "deck ape", in the merchant fleet, I can't recall ever seeing a line "coiled" on a working vessel. If it's realism you're after, you want to store your line "faked", or "fayed", so it properly pays out as you need it without fouling. And notice I used the word "line", and not rope, as it's properly called a line once it crosses the gunnel from the dock. There is no such thing as a "rope" on a vessel. At any rate, google those two terms, and you can see pics of how it's done. As far as modeling it, you can save yourself a lot of trouble by using wax paper while you're gluing it down, and you won't have to trim or sand anything, as cyano, epoxies, or any other adhesives won't stick to it.
Lordy, as I proof read this post, it did sound kinda snooty, sorry for that, but please take it in the tone as it was meant to be an informative help, and not preaching.
Fair winds, and following seas....
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gary r uk

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Re: How do you? re ropes lying coiled in perfect circles on the deck
« Reply #31 on: October 10, 2007, 10:37:24 AM »

hi
George Turner models makes resin rope coils in various sizes.
you should find him in the traders directory on this site.
gary
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dondecap

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Re: How do you? re ropes lying coiled in perfect circles on the deck
« Reply #32 on: September 16, 2011, 04:28:21 PM »

hi guys.
just to reviv the thread with some terms..........from

Marlinespike - Terminolgy

Bitter end:
   
the free end of a line

Standing part:
   
the longer part of a line which is fixed during the tying of a knot

Bight:
   
The part of the rope between the end and the standing part. A loop formed by folding the rope back on itself

Turn:
   
a loop formed around a post, rail, or the line itself

Crossing Turn:
   
a circle of rope made by crossing the rope over itself

Loop:
   
a circle of rope made by bringing two parts of the rope together without crossing them over each other

Splice:
   
weaving strands of a line to itself or to a second piece of line

Whipping:
   
wrapping twine or tape around line to lineís end to prevent unraveling

Seizing:
   
wrapping twine or tape around two lines to bind two parts of line side by side

Worming:
   
laying smaller line in the spiral grooves (with the lay) between line strands

Parcelling:
   
winding strips of canvas over, and in the same direction as, worming

Serving:
   
winding small line against the lay and over worming and parcelling to protect line from chafe and water damage

Flemish:
   
to make a Flemish coil by taking the end of a line and laying it in a tight flat spiral on the deck. Used to "tidy" up and keep line neat

Faking:
   
laying a line on deck in a series figure eights so the line will run free without tangling

Flaking:
   
laying out line on deck in parallel rows. Donít confuse with faking.

Short splice:
   
the strongest way to connect two lines. This splice has 6 strands in the cross section and is thick and may not run through a block

Long splice:
   
the strand of one line replaces the strand of the other line. The size of line is kept the same however, and it is weaker than the short splice

Eye splice:
   
stronger than any knot in forming a loop in a line

Thimble:
   
a metal or plastic form inserted in the eye splice to prevent chafe

Back splice:
   
splicing a line back on itself to prevent unraveling - it like the short splice has a cross section of 6 strands and may not be able to be pulled through a block

Eye:
   
A loop made in the end of a rope either by knotting, seizing or splicing.

Coil:
   
Rope made into a neat series of loops or circles, usually for storing.

so does this cloud the issues more?  we are after some authenticity eh?
unless you are of coarse building a flashy yacht

regards
don

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Netleyned

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Re: How do you? re ropes lying coiled in perfect circles on the deck
« Reply #33 on: September 16, 2011, 04:35:11 PM »

Surely a 'crossing' turn is really a riding turn
or is it?

Ned
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