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Author Topic: Planking Glue  (Read 5450 times)

fortyfourpm

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Planking Glue
« on: February 09, 2008, 08:17:34 AM »

Hi All, newbie here. I have started building the Sergal Thermopylae and have come to a stop. I used a 2 part epoxy for building the Hull, but I don't know what to use for the planking. I want something that I can work with that will set relatively quickly and that will last. I've seen a few posts of people using superglue. Do you get the lastablilty with this, or will it start to seperate over time? Any help appreciated.
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boatmadman

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2008, 09:09:48 AM »

I have used evo stick external waterproof white glue many times. Lots of time to adjust the fit, sets clear and is sandable. The final joint when properly set is stronger than the wood around it.

Ian
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Bunkerbarge

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2008, 12:37:09 PM »

I always glue wood with a white PVA glue.  B&Q do thier own and there are many proprietary names such as "Resin W" who do waterproof versions such as the one I use.

The attraction for me is not only the fact that it soaks in to the wood extreemly well but it dries clear, is very strong and it can be watered down for attaching more detailed work or laying cartridge paper deck plating onto a ply deck.  Complex structures such as frames or ladders can be dry assembled and then painted with the watered down glue, which will soak in and dry such that you can't see it.
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dreadnought72

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2008, 12:11:53 PM »



I'm using waterproof PVA for my lime strip planks on a thin ply subdeck. Like others have said, it gives you time to work on it, sets transparent, spills can be wiped off, and it's stronger than the wood when dry.

Marvellous stuff!

Andy
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bigford

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2008, 12:26:18 PM »

white PVA..  is that elmers glue?
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dreadnought72

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2008, 03:51:17 PM »

I believe so - polyvinyl acetate, white, viscous stuff.

Andy
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bigford

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2008, 04:29:10 PM »

just foung this
Most PVAs are not water proof. The yellow PVAs have a higher moisture resistance than the white ones, but neither are completely water proof.
Never allow your PVAs to freeze. This breaks down the polymers and your glue will be rendered useless!
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barryfoote

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2008, 06:09:19 PM »

One thing is certain....Do not use superglue. PVA is best and you can get the waterproof variety if it is needed.

Barry
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plugger

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2008, 06:45:28 AM »

For static display models such as Sergals Thermopylae, I use PVA for the first planking. Second planking (if used on this model) I have used a contact adhesive. If you shape the planks to fit the curvature of the hull, you can decrease the strain on the joint. I have not had a plank peel off a model - my first was completed 10 years ago. Only problem I have found is cleaning up spills/excess glue.
I have switched to using superglue for the second planking. No problems so far.

Dave
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Bryan Young

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2008, 07:32:15 PM »

Hi All, newbie here. I have started building the Sergal Thermopylae and have come to a stop. I used a 2 part epoxy for building the Hull, but I don't know what to use for the planking. I want something that I can work with that will set relatively quickly and that will last. I've seen a few posts of people using superglue. Do you get the lastablilty with this, or will it start to seperate over time? Any help appreciated.
"Superglue" is too quick. Try using "Bostick" (the one in the purple tube), on occasion I have had to remove a plank or two from the underdeck and have had to use a chisel to do it. Is circa 1972 long enough lasting for you?
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Bryan Young

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2008, 09:22:33 PM »



I'm using waterproof PVA for my lime strip planks on a thin ply subdeck. Like others have said, it gives you time to work on it, sets transparent, spills can be wiped off, and it's stronger than the wood when dry.

Marvellous stuff!

Andy
Lovely joggling. What scale? Wish my old eyes/hands were that precise. Keep it up. BY.
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dreadnought72

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2008, 08:49:22 AM »

Thanks for the kind words, Brian.

It's the (start) of the deck on my 1/72nd scale Dreadnought. Planks are ~1/8th by 3 inches. The long, slow build is detailed here. I'm aiming for the hull in the water later this year, with completion sometime in 2009. But getting there is much of the fun, so I'm not rushing!

Andy
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dreadnought72

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #12 on: February 13, 2008, 08:51:50 AM »

Sorry Bryan, for the misspelt name - it won't happen again!

Andy
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Bryan Young

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #13 on: February 13, 2008, 11:03:01 PM »

Sorry Bryan, for the misspelt name - it won't happen again!

Andy
No worries (just to appease our Antipodean pals). I do wonder about your "shift of butts" though. Are you going for a 4 or 5 shift?
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dreadnought72

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2008, 09:26:45 AM »

Four, Bryan - three planks in between repeats. Is this incorrect?

I searched through all the photos I have of capital ships from the period - and it's surprising how rarely anyone's bothered to take clear photos of decks. I looked in the Anatomy of The Ship book for the Dreadnought, which is my primary plan for this build; but this has no info on this issue - and is, regrettably, blatantly wrong when detailing the planking on the superstructure platforms.

So I plumped for four - each plank is four inches long (not three as I mistakenly mentioned earlier in this thread) and "quartering" the joints made mathematical sense. It also ties in better with the station numbers - these are either 2' or 3' spaces, depending on which bit of the hull is being looked at. While I know there's no real link between the steel hull's stations and the planking on top of the steel subdeck, I wondered if whatever was used to support the planking would depend "somewhat" on the stations beneath.

Andy, now somewhat petrified with wondering whether I need to rip 'em up and start again...
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red181

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #15 on: April 09, 2008, 03:44:22 PM »

Nice work dreadnought, I am embarking on a planking project, how did you get that wonderful curve around the edge, and what are you using between the planks?
Many thanks
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dreadnought72

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #16 on: April 09, 2008, 04:19:08 PM »

Hi there!

The curve around the barbettes:

On a sheet of ply, I used a compass to mark on the required inner and outer diameter for the edge-planks that run around the barbettes. I then marked out 60 degree radial lines. I covered the ply with sellotape, in order to keep this glue-free (I've got five turrets to do).

Then I laminated (thin edge-to-thin edge) enough planks to cover a sixth of the circle. Obviously you can do three at once on the former without problems. Once set, I used the compass to mark both curves on the lamination, then trimmed these to size and took them off the ply former.

Each segment got glue applied to it before being stuck to the ply sub-deck, and a few small weights held them down against the camber. Where nibbing into these laminations occurs, I simply trim the wood (once well-stuck) in situ.

The caulking

Thread - and lots of it. There's a detailed "how to" (actually, more like a "merely one way how to") here.

Regards!

Andy
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StarLocAdhesives/FiveStar

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Re: Planking Glue
« Reply #17 on: April 09, 2008, 07:05:09 PM »

Most people tend to use thin cyano these days, holding the wood in place and running the thin cyano behind to stick it instantly, some use pva behind to bond it and just cyano to tack it, both ways work

Most PVA is not waterproof , some are more water resistant than others such as aliphatic and aliphatic resin, both are pva just with an aded resin,

Some pva is a crosslinking pva , this means that after the water is lost from the glue it then cures like the cascamite type using a similar catylist that is inbuilt into the adhesive, stable while wet and fully waterproof when dry (after about a week of losing the water it becomes resistant to even hot water), all our PVA and the Aliphatic resin is now of the crosslinking type formulation, most available are not crosslinking (none in general use we have found to have been crosslinking types)
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