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Author Topic: Ship's Equipment and Construction  (Read 7680 times)

Bunkerbarge

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #25 on: February 21, 2008, 01:40:38 pm »

All interesting stuff again Bryan and great resources for puttin g together a model.

The winch is interesting in so far as the cylinders are vertical and quite nicely done with wooden lagging, that has already given me an idea for my own steamer!!

The caulking is interesting as you rightly say it isn't always even.  It starts out peerfect when fitted and sanded down but repairs over the years are very rarely done with the planks lifted so caulking is simply laid over the top of the deck giving an uneven effect.  I've already built some of this effect into my decking, to make it more realistic of course!!! ::)
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"Dirty British coaster with a salt-caked smoke stack, Butting through the Channel in the mad March days"

Bryan Young

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #26 on: February 21, 2008, 02:12:40 pm »

All interesting stuff again Bryan and great resources for puttin g together a model.

The winch is interesting in so far as the cylinders are vertical and quite nicely done with wooden lagging, that has already given me an idea for my own steamer!!

The caulking is interesting as you rightly say it isn't always even.  It starts out peerfect when fitted and sanded down but repairs over the years are very rarely done with the planks lifted so caulking is simply laid over the top of the deck giving an uneven effect.  I've already built some of this effect into my decking, to make it more realistic of course!!! ::)
I was quite fascinated with this little windlass as it appears to be back to front! The spurling pipes which have to be behind the windlass are at the opposite end to the cylinders. Very strange. Ta for reading this little lot. Remarkable what I can find to do while waiting for my lathe motor. Bryan.
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Notes from a simple seaman

Bryan Young

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #27 on: February 21, 2008, 04:30:03 pm »

Deck Planking.
There have been a couple of posts recently on this post wanting info...so here goes.
The drawing is to no particular scale , but as said earlier try thinking about 4" wide, although not many will notice if the scale is a bit "out". The ship side guttering ( or waterway or whatever you want to call it) is probably between 9" and 1' wide.
The Margin Plank is wider than the deck planks, and its joins should'nt line up with the adjacent deck planks...so these can be any length that suits.
In this example I have used a 2:4:1:3 pattern which I find quite pleasing at a model scale. Try some others, but try to keep the separation of butts at the maximum. Lay the planks from the centre outwards to keep it regular, the centre plank straddling the ship centre line.
All "holes" cut through the deck should be surrounded by margin planks as shown....not to scale, just to give an idea.
Short lengths of plank should be avoided. I have included a few on the drawing just to show how silly it can look. But the continuation of lengths should be regular otherwise the butt lines will be all over the place.
Hope this one helps....
As I keep getting a "Windows cannot display this page" message I will again do it in 2 parts. BY.
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Notes from a simple seaman

Bryan Young

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #28 on: February 21, 2008, 04:31:32 pm »

Deck Planking Part 2.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #29 on: February 21, 2008, 04:45:27 pm »

Back to Shell Plating.
Shift of Butts: only 1 simple rule as far as model makers are concerned. Butts in adjacent strakes must be at least 2 frame spaces apart. For modelling purposes use 24" for frame spacing.
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Notes from a simple seaman

Bryan Young

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #30 on: February 21, 2008, 04:50:30 pm »

The Plated (or solid) Bulwark.
1. Stanchions (or stiffeners) not more than 6' apart.
2. Freeing ports. This drawing explains the operation better than my earlier posting re. how they are self-operating using gravity. Noisy sods though. Clanging away all day and all night!
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Bryan Young

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #31 on: February 21, 2008, 05:02:18 pm »

Sternframe, Single Plate Rudder and Twin Screws.
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Notes from a simple seaman

Colin Bishop

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #32 on: February 22, 2008, 08:58:52 pm »

Bryan was beginning to feel a bit lonely on this topic despite the useful material he has posted so I thought I'd chip in.

The illustrations below are taken from "Scale Model Ships" first published by Reeve and Thomas in 1951. I got my copy as a Form prize at school in 1962, the only time I ever came top of the class. sadly it's been all downhill ever since... Although model boating was a bit primitive in those days I still find some of these drawings very useful references both for their subject matter and their clarity so I thought it was worth posting them.

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Colin Bishop

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #33 on: February 22, 2008, 09:01:06 pm »

And a few more...
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yewmount

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #34 on: June 15, 2008, 08:05:13 pm »

Nice thread Bryan and a great idea.
I well remember the "Deep Sea Sounding Lead" but have to admit never having seen it used, no matter how long we were sailing by DR.

On the subject of "strange" items, has anybody heard of, or seen used, a "Jim Crow"? I have once. Kept, and used by, "Chippie" it was a form of Crowbar [hence the nickname] used to straighten removable railings which were taken down while working cargo with the ships gear. As such they were subject to a lot of hammering.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #35 on: June 15, 2008, 10:56:44 pm »

Nice thread Bryan and a great idea.
I well remember the "Deep Sea Sounding Lead" but have to admit never having seen it used, no matter how long we were sailing by DR.

On the subject of "strange" items, has anybody heard of, or seen used, a "Jim Crow"? I have once. Kept, and used by, "Chippie" it was a form of Crowbar [hence the nickname] used to straighten removable railings which were taken down while working cargo with the ships gear. As such they were subject to a lot of hammering.
Tell me more. This is a new one to me. BY.
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Notes from a simple seaman

Don

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #36 on: June 16, 2008, 01:45:18 am »

Thank you very much for an absolutely great thread.  I not only love the history, but I have started a file directory called “How to Make”.

More and more please.

Don
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Bob

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Re: Ship's Equipment and Construction
« Reply #37 on: June 16, 2008, 07:13:42 am »

Brian
"JIM CROW"   The one I had an "opportunity" to use took 2 BIG apprentices to lift while "the man" carried the CROW BAR. We were using it to bend or straighten railway irons. Never saw "chippy" with one but all would work the same. The "bar" was put across the claws and pressure bought to bear by the movable head attached to the end of a heavy square threaded screw that was turned by the 6ft crow bar put into the hole through the boss at its head. it was shifted as required to make the bend or correction to a bend. Just a bit at a time.
Bob Ferguson, NZ
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