Model Boat Mayhem

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length.

Author Topic: Nautical "Strange but True!"  (Read 151579 times)

BarryM

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,692
  • Location: West Lothian
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #475 on: November 13, 2009, 01:44:06 pm »

I'm just wondering about coupling the ability to buy Newcastle Brown with "civilised"?

Barry M
Logged

Bryan Young

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6,893
  • Location: Whitley Bay
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #476 on: November 13, 2009, 05:57:06 pm »

I'm just wondering about coupling the ability to buy Newcastle Brown with "civilised"?

Barry M
I don't suppose there is a "coupling" as you put it, but when one is almost as far away from "home" as it's possible to get then a little sight of "home" in the most unexpected of places can give a sort of warm glow....even without drinking it. Apart from that, I tend to the belief that the "Tassies" share a similar mind-set to the Geaordies and Scousers...so we get on together..but as I seem to like all Aussies and NZers.........BY.
Logged
Notes from a simple seaman

BarryM

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,692
  • Location: West Lothian
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #477 on: November 13, 2009, 06:04:42 pm »

Hah, we are still picking up the pieces - and sticking some of them together - after the biannual invasion of Oz and Kiwi rellies who this year brought massive reinforcements.  Only the Noggies are capable of greater devastation; so why do I like 'em? 

Cheers,

Barry M
Logged

Bryan Young

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6,893
  • Location: Whitley Bay
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #478 on: November 25, 2009, 07:23:23 pm »

A couple of weeks off for a walk in the park and all of a sudden it's presumed that I've popped my clogs.
Sorry to disabuse you.
But the last time I talked to you I left you drifting around the Med somewhere. Perhaps our Nav couldn't find Malta, after all, it is quite small.

I recall a certain amount of hostility to our visit...Maltese politics have always baffled me. They welcome our tourists but not those who saved them in WW2. A funny lot, even before Mintoff decided that he liked the Chinese more than us Brits. But it's a very odd sort of place (or was, in 1988). A language that no-one but themselves can understand, taxis and busses that would never in a million years pass an MOT (no wonder that the taxi and bus drivers used to say a prayer and cross themselves before setting off). A huge church for every day of the year...the noise of the Sunday bells was mind-blowing. A skyline dominated by very tall TV aerials (must have been some sort of status symbol). Only 2 colours, various shades of brown and blue.....brown landscape and buildings and blue sky and water, but also lots of black-clad local people. No birds. The locals shoot them all. Even the sea-gulls give the place a miss. Yet Grand Harbour is a place of great and outstanding beauty. So you may have gathered that Malta was not very high on my list of favourite places. Times may have changed....

Due to the antagonism about our visit, each ship (apart from Olwen) was allowed to "opt-out" and go someplace else. We had to stay "close(ish)" to "Ark". A couple of ships decided to go to Augusta (Sicily...not the US, although ...well, why not). But as a "just-in-case" measure "Orangeleaf" disgorged as much of her cargo as we could take. That took 7 hours out of the day. But then the situation became more "as usual"....the "Ark" and somebody else went into Grand Harbour to "do their bit", while the RFAs were to anchor 2 miles off St.Pauls....miles away. In a pretty steep swell at that. I really must be a born optimist because I always felt despondent when this was such a regular occurrence. Over the past month, on top of all the other "stuff", I'd spent ages arranging the hire of wind-surf boards, trips, visits and so on for the ships company.....only for our "agent of choice" to succumb to media pressure and chicken-out. So everything went for a ball of chalk. "Fort Grange" got seriously hacked off with all this hoo-ha and took herself off to Cyprus. So there we sat for 4 days. No breaking of the watch routines. No "enjoyment". Out of sight and out of mind and everyone on board feeling very cheated. Nor did we get any mail. "Ark" got hers, but it was a bit "inconvenient" to put ours on a sea-boat so they sent it off to Cyprus....despondency was now turning into anger.
This little lot isn't reading like a recruitment advert for the RFA is it. But that's the way it was.

We by-passed Cyprus and went south of Crete towards Port Said. Many of our crew (more often the young officers than the "old hand" ratings) had never experienced or expected the sea conditions that you can get when coming out of the lee of Crete. This is the area where Paul Gallico sited his novel "The Posseidon Adventure", and in real life, the ex-Bibby liner "Leicestershire" turned over. For a few hours it was more like being in a N.Atlantic winter storm than the Eastern Med. Not unusual, but it was a bit of a "wake-up" call to the more inexperienced or just plain complacent.

It was about now that the news broke about the mighty and infallible USN shooting down a (Korean?) airliner. Hmm. Gave some pause for thought and concern.
The Suez transit was as uneventful and as unexciting as usual, with the exception of the unusual steep rise in air temperature. Generally speaking I would hazard that going from the mid 70s at Port Said to the low 90s at Port Tewfik would be "normal".....but 110*F was not nice....it hurt. But only 20 days before Singapore. This may seem a long time, we could do that run in a fraction of the time. But the RN has never really got to grips with straight lines on charts. A bit of meandering is always required. Except that in the "Red Sea" you can't, or not very much. What a dreary part of the world is the Red Sea (I think it's called the "Red" sea because of the dust that gets into every natural orifice). Every time I ever went up or down this "rift" I would recall my cadet days in hell-holes like Port Sudan, Jeddha, Djibouti and Aden. I tell you, the most God-forsaken council sink-hole estates in the UK are sheer paradise compared to these places. But eventually we turned left and headed eastwards. Past an island that in my younger days I would have loved to visit..Socotra..but probably just as well I didn't as there is a "there be cannibals" sort of warning.

But by now we were back into "Portland In The Sun" sort of mode. Portland "Work-Ups" were hard work and miserable at the best of times. But I find it hard to say whether doing it in cold weather or very hot weather (or vice verca) one is better (subjective) than the other. In hot weather it feels like one is permanently on the verge of either heat-stroke or a heart attack. So I'll go for cold weather.
Then the Air Con system broke down. Go back to the cabin for a rest but only to find the place is at 90*F. No good opening the ports as the wind is from aft and I really don't want the funnel fumes in here on top of all that. I think I (and others) may have felt a tad suicidal at this point. And I've got a 6 hour stint on the flight deck to do tomorrow morning.
The Bridge team have been "relatively" protected from all this as they are watchkeepers. Getting promoted is not always a "good-thing"! And we are still a long way from completing this bloody audit. Me and "my team" all look, feel and behave like old wet dish rags..and we are to greet our wives in about 10 days when we get to Singapore when we are due a 3 week break. With the AirCon goosed and the "cold water" out of the taps too hot to put a hand in, temperatures both physical and mental were beginning to get a wee bit ragged.
But at least I've got rid of that red dust from my nether regions.
I shall continue!!!!!!!!! BY

Logged
Notes from a simple seaman

Colin Bishop

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 10,851
  • Location: SW Surrey, UK
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #479 on: November 25, 2009, 07:30:55 pm »

Very graphic Bryan, and to think that Sharm el Sheikh on the Red Sea is now a major tourist destination!

Colin
Logged

BarryM

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,692
  • Location: West Lothian
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #480 on: November 25, 2009, 11:18:01 pm »

Bryan,

How nice to have you back and we won't inquire too closely why you were wandering around a park for a couple of weeks. Age does tend to affect the powers of navigation and perhaps the exit was one of those awkward ones that are so hard to find?   ;D

Mention of the duff aircon reminds me of a tanker's aircon problem when I was sailing 2/Eng - best job in the world. She was the typical 'Mates midships' and 'everybody else aft' configuration. All was fine until the motor for the aft, starboard, aircon compressor burned out; the unit supplying the Engineers and Firemens accommodation which was on top of and around the Engine/Boiler Room - and we were in the Tropics..  Nothing could be done; we didn't have a spare, we couldn't cannibalise from elsewhere and it was going to be a long time before the motor could be sent ashore for rewinding. The temperature in the accommodation soared.

At lunch that day, taken as usual in the Officers Saloon (aft and fed from the port, working, aircon unit) and mention was made of the problem and mutterings from the Firemen. "Hah", said the Old Man, "we didn't have airconditioning when I first went to sea. Didn't need it then, don't need it now. But if the crew are unhappy, why not take the motor from the midships airconditioning unit?"
The look of horror on the Mate's face was a picture but he knew better than to argue with that Old Man.
Excusing myself, I rapidly mobilised the 8-12 watch, the daywork Engineer and the E/R Storekeeper with a willing band of Firemen. If the Guinness Book of Records had sent reps they would have witnessed a World Record for extracting a very large (1400 lb?) motor from a confined space, along the Flying Bridge and up to the aft boatdeck. By the time I went on watch that afternoon, the starboard A/C unit was purring away and the cabins had cooled down.

Until the motor was rewound, the Mates spent the next three weeks with every available port open while quietly cursing the Old Man (out of his hearing). I think even the Old Man realised he had made a mistake as he sat in his cabin, reportedly dressed only in his underpants but there was no way he would admit it. As the Mate sat in my (cool) cabin, drinking my (cold) beer, I almost offered him the use of my daybed. Almost - but not quite.  ok2

Barry M  
Logged

Bryan Young

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6,893
  • Location: Whitley Bay
Nautical strange but true
« Reply #481 on: March 08, 2010, 02:56:20 pm »

Sorry about this, but I was quietly thinking of continuing that thread, but for some reason or other I can't find it any more. Has it been moved, deleted or whatever? Now that I'm coming out of hibernation I thought it was about time I gave Roger in France something more to read over his corn-flakes. Bryan Y.
Logged
Notes from a simple seaman

chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Nautical strange but true
« Reply #482 on: March 08, 2010, 04:31:19 pm »

It is still here Bryan, try this link
http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=8808.500


Brian
Logged

Roger in France

  • Guest
Re: Nautical strange but true
« Reply #483 on: March 08, 2010, 05:33:52 pm »

Bryan, I assure you that you have a much more extensive readership than just me.

Also, I try not to eat breakfast when I am on Mayhem as I find the croissant crumbs jam the key board!

Roger in France
Logged

Bryan Young

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6,893
  • Location: Whitley Bay
Re: Nautical strange but true
« Reply #484 on: March 08, 2010, 05:35:13 pm »

Wow!...Thanks for that Brian. Now it's time to regroup the grey matter and embark on the final stages of 40 years as a seaman becoming a beaurocrat (pen pusher....although still in a ship).
I feel I should sort of warn you that the purveyors (i.e. writers) of an RFA site that is specialising in "publishing" tales of the RFA has asked me if I had (have) any objections to their re-printing my little ditties on their site. Well, that's OK by me. But they are all my rememberances, and so, in a way, they belong to me. I do hope that the Forum Moderators don't object too strongly. I really don't know how "they" came to beware of the thread.....but it would appear that present and ex RFA people are aware of my memorabilia, so as I get to the more recent recollections, the more careful I have to be. I would absolutely love to "name names" but the cost of a lawsuit sort of intimidates me a little. Naturally, the RFA site is only interested in my recollections of life in the RFA.....you, old readers , will perhaps recall my formative years in the "Ben Line" and "Cable & Wireless". Anyway, once I get the site address for the RFA thingy I'll pass it on to you so (perhaps) you'll get to see the other side...or not.
I've enjoyed (so far) re-living my life at sea with the members of this forum. So many people from so many different walks of life, but all interested in the various aspects of Model Boating (or Ships)....
But bear with me. I'll continue with "Olwen" ASAP . Thanks to all those who have mailed me to continue. BY.
Logged
Notes from a simple seaman

Bryan Young

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6,893
  • Location: Whitley Bay
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #485 on: March 08, 2010, 06:03:33 pm »

Hello Bryan
We're all still here and reading your episodes. If you keep your eye on the viewing figures of "Nautical, Strange but True" (currently 14306) you will be able to see how many read it.  I'm pretty sure that if we thought it was rubbish, you wouldn't be getting anywhere near that number of views.
Anyway, you can't stop now, I'm looking forward to getting lots of free pints down the pub when I regale them with MY adventures in the RFA (only joking, I wouldn't really steal your exploits and claim them for my own just to get a few free drinks .............. probably)  %)
Danny


We are going back a bit here.....but remind me more of your "exploits" in the RFA. The RFA was full of nut-cases (I plead guilty), but still enjoy the stupidity of it all. BY.
Logged
Notes from a simple seaman

Bryan Young

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6,893
  • Location: Whitley Bay
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #486 on: March 08, 2010, 07:37:51 pm »

Sorry about the little gap-----but it's nice to see this thread back in the mainstream of postings.
I think I'm now starting to think I'm I am in the 21st century.
I am also looking (as if I was a youngster) at a career "at sea". I shudder. When I were a lad....etc......ships went into a port and eiither loaded or offloaded "stuff". This process took a long time. Perhaps a few weeks. Naturally, the shipowners would welcome a shorter "turn-around" time and eventually they got it.
For those in "tankers" this wasn't anything new. They always went to somewhere obscure and miles from anywhere...and not for very long. Us lucky sods in dry-cargo ships had the long end of the straw. OK, It was hard work, but at least we could get ashore and sample foreign life.  But now the "dry" cargo ships are doing the same "turnaround" times as those old tankers.
So what's the point of "going to sea"?
In my case it was to have a look at life and life-styles that were really quite alien to me. And I saw it, loved it and welcomed it. It was pure education. Nastiness, warmth and violence...all there. If you weren't a junior sailor in the 1950s then you really have missed out on one of the great life experiences. Life at sea was certainly not about making your fortune...unless tou were "on the take", as many senior officers were.....but as a youngster it was more about seeing things that were beyond anything that school (grammar in my case) could ever prepare you for. And so I saw other cultures, saw life in its many forms. Religious, cultural and plain down on the street dirty. A modern seafarer sees nothing of that.
So why "go to sea"?
"Shipping Companies" as such no longer seem to exist. You can "buy" a ship, engage a management company to staff it, employ an"agent" to get you cargoes..............and never ever have any contact with the people you are employing.
Is this a backward step or not. When I first went"to sea" loyalty to the "company" was almost a religion. And in most cases the commitment was reciprocated. So it all became a sort of "family".
Even in the late 1960s it was viewed as a sort of heresy to leave the company that had trained you. That was the British Way.
And then all the household names went twits-up.
Thank goodness that I had the nonce to see that in advance, and so went "non-commercial".
Eventually (perhaps foreseeing the demise of C&W) the RFA offered the best option.
And so began the "Nautical But True" thingy on this site.
I think I'm up to 1988 on this.....but I'll continue.BY
Logged
Notes from a simple seaman

Jimmy James

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 988
  • Location: Kings Lynn Norfolk
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #487 on: March 08, 2010, 09:24:33 pm »

Are you talking about names like Ben Line, Blue Flue, Blue Star, Chatty Chapmans, John I Jacobs, Halls of Newcastle, Hungry Hogarths, Baltic Line, B.I., Wilsons (Not Ellermans) Atlantic Steam Navagation, Metcalfs, to mention some I've Been on Also the Grey funnel Line and X number of Survey Ships,  Most are long gone and the like will never be seen again {:-{ :((
De Freebooter
Logged
Retired  Ships Officer/ Master.
Experience: 50+ years at sea under Sail, Steam & Motor
Kings Lynn

Bryan Young

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6,893
  • Location: Whitley Bay
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #488 on: March 08, 2010, 10:51:53 pm »

Exactly.....and many more I could add to your list. Once the "accountants" and legalistras got into the boardrooms and began "diversifying" the writing was like Banksy on the wall.  BY.
Logged
Notes from a simple seaman

BarryM

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,692
  • Location: West Lothian
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #489 on: March 08, 2010, 11:24:53 pm »

"For those in "tankers" this wasn't anything new. They always went to somewhere obscure and miles from anywhere...and not for very long. "

Not necessarily Bryan. Although I remember places like Mena Al Ahmadi and Kharg Island which were instantly consigned to the 'forgettable' file, I have no doubt that not all cargo ships had handy town berths.

My first trip as an Apprentice included 4 months on the Brazilian coast (slow discharge through a single 6" line) which left me wide eyed and legless and with an aversion to bootleg Bacardi for many years plus happy runs ashore in Rotterdam, Hamburg and several other ports willing to offer an education to the all-too-willing to be led astray.
Subsequent years brought contact with ports from Anchorage to Sydney and Singapore to San Francisco. We were rarely far from the bright lights and, if we spent less time in port than the cargo ships, we probably berthed at more ports than they did. Thus it was all swings and roundabouts.

The real shame is, as you say, that a way of life has gone for ever and modern seafaring is a totally different way of life. The oggin may still go up and down, the pay and conditions may be improved for them that sail on it but a way of life and the experiences it brought have disappeared.  We were the lucky ones.

Cheers,

Barry M
Logged

MikeK

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 991
  • Utter Bloody Chaos !!
  • Location: Hampshire
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #490 on: March 09, 2010, 08:06:19 am »

Cannot agree more with both your sentiments BY & BM, as a time served Cardiff tramp apprentice 1957-1961, the four corners of the world were my finishing school and boy did I learn a few things  :o Now it's all hurry, hurry with accountants breathing down the ship's neck. Miss the blokes but less sentimental about the job

Mike
Logged

BarryM

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,692
  • Location: West Lothian
Re: Nautical "Strange but True!"
« Reply #491 on: March 09, 2010, 08:50:10 am »

It brings to mind a certain Master who, after a particularly enjoyable Crossing the Line ceremony, turned the ship around and re-crossed it just so that they could do it all again.  %%

Try explaining that to the Head Office in these days!

Barry M
Logged

Bryan Young

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6,893
  • Location: Whitley Bay
Re: Nautical strange but true
« Reply #492 on: March 09, 2010, 04:41:20 pm »

It is still here Bryan, try this link
http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=8808.500


Brian
Your response was both welome and appreciated. However, I notice that the "early years" (my cadetship in the Ben Line) are not on that site. And, alas, these were the bits I was looking for! It was so long ago now that I've honestly forgotten how it all started! I think (hah) that it began with some odd ditties swapped with the Bishop. But I can't be sure. More help? Regards, Bryan.
Logged
Notes from a simple seaman

pugwash

  • Guest
Re: Nautical strange but true
« Reply #493 on: March 09, 2010, 05:19:30 pm »

Bryan I have enjoyed your seagoing sagas - I was just a mere novice only 10 years grey funnel line and 12
years yachting - not much compared with your 40 yrs.  Our paths must have crossed somewhere - probably
about 100 ft away as that was the standard distance for a RAS
Keep the story coming along
Pugwash
Logged

Bryan Young

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6,893
  • Location: Whitley Bay
Re: Nautical strange but true
« Reply #494 on: March 09, 2010, 06:37:37 pm »

Bryan I have enjoyed your seagoing sagas - I was just a mere novice only 10 years grey funnel line and 12
years yachting - not much compared with your 40 yrs.  Our paths must have crossed somewhere - probably
about 100 ft away as that was the standard distance for a RAS
Keep the story coming along
Pugwash
We talked at the South Shields Model Boat Show last year. I believe you were trying to find records of some conversion done to a frigate. (Bacchante?......).BY.
Logged
Notes from a simple seaman

pugwash

  • Guest
Re: Nautical strange but true
« Reply #495 on: March 09, 2010, 07:15:19 pm »

Thats right. I remember meeting some of the Tynemouth MBC crew but though I never forget a face
I am lousy with names and getting worse as I get older - had just finished HMS Juno and was looking
for plans for HMS Aisne AD conversion  - drew them myself in the end - hope to see you at south
shields this year by only 6 days after hip op so I might be pushing it.

Pugwash
Logged

Roger in France

  • Guest
Re: Nautical strange but true
« Reply #496 on: March 10, 2010, 07:21:10 am »

Bryan,

I am pleased that someone else thinks your words deserve a wider audience. You may recall that when you started I told you I thought them worthy of publishing.

A word of warning. As you say they are yours and you need to think carefully about how easily you grant permission for them to be reproduced and in what form. I think you may need to consider where you stand if other parties make money from them. However, even if there are no financial considerations you should ensure their integrity by retaining copyright, by insisting you are acknowledged as the author and that granting permission to reproduce does not detract from your copyright. You may also want to insist that you have prior approval of any editorial changes, additions, deletions, the adding of any titles, captions, explanatory notes or illustrations.

I think I probably understand you well enough to hear you saying, "Do I need all this?". But I am sorry to say in this litigious and money grubbing world you need to protect your interests.

Roger in France.
Logged

Bryan Young

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6,893
  • Location: Whitley Bay
Re: Nautical strange but true
« Reply #497 on: March 10, 2010, 02:29:24 pm »

Bryan,

I am pleased that someone else thinks your words deserve a wider audience. You may recall that when you started I told you I thought them worthy of publishing.

A word of warning. As you say they are yours and you need to think carefully about how easily you grant permission for them to be reproduced and in what form. I think you may need to consider where you stand if other parties make money from them. However, even if there are no financial considerations you should ensure their integrity by retaining copyright, by insisting you are acknowledged as the author and that granting permission to reproduce does not detract from your copyright. You may also want to insist that you have prior approval of any editorial changes, additions, deletions, the adding of any titles, captions, explanatory notes or illustrations.

I think I probably understand you well enough to hear you saying, "Do I need all this?". But I am sorry to say in this litigious and money grubbing world you need to protect your interests.

Roger in France.
Roger, not too sure how to answer that. The people running the RFA site are only interested in the RFA "bits" and have promised to acknowledge the fact that they were first disseminated on this forum. I would have assumed that they had contacted the site owner (Martin). All I have done is to give them my permission to copy....but some sort of contact with Martin, even if only out of politeness, should have occured. Do you think I should send a PM (either to both parties or just one of them) with contact details?
There are many posting/threads on this forum .....are they all copyrighted to the "poster" by default? There are also many instances (I refer primarily to the thread "Is there anyone out there?) where regular quotations from original authors are used.
The RFA site writers have actually sent me the first batch of what they intend to place on the site, with a request that I "pass" them. As far as I'm concerned it's all being done "in good faith"....anything wrong in that? Bryan.
Logged
Notes from a simple seaman

Roger in France

  • Guest
Re: Nautical strange but true
« Reply #498 on: March 10, 2010, 04:37:39 pm »

I cannot speak for Martin. I wrote the above as a fellow Member, interested in your jottings (and not as a Moderator). It may be good to PM Martin, refer to the above posts and ensure he is happy.

When I wrote I was more concerned to protect your interests than that of Mayhem as I had assumed Martin was in the circuit.

I guessed you would feel all was being done in "...good faith..." as you say. However, if it were me I would still insist on "Copyright Bryan Young 2010". I also would insist on the right to see what was to be published in advance and the right to approve/disapprove.

My own experience (when I did a lot of writing and media work) was once to narrowly avoid a law suit because an item I produced was introduced on the BBC with a slanderous comment as an intro. I would not want you saddled with...."Here are some jottings from someone who describes the disorganised chaos of the RFA"...or something worse.


Sorry to be a prophet of doom but it is better to avoid damage than repair it.

Roger in France
Logged

Bryan Young

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6,893
  • Location: Whitley Bay
Re: Nautical strange but true
« Reply #499 on: March 10, 2010, 04:53:32 pm »

I cannot speak for Martin. I wrote the above as a fellow Member, interested in your jottings (and not as a Moderator). It may be good to PM Martin, refer to the above posts and ensure he is happy.

When I wrote I was more concerned to protect your interests than that of Mayhem as I had assumed Martin was in the circuit.

I guessed you would feel all was being done in "...good faith..." as you say. However, if it were me I would still insist on "Copyright Bryan Young 2010". I also would insist on the right to see what was to be published in advance and the right to approve/disapprove.

My own experience (when I did a lot of writing and media work) was once to narrowly avoid a law suit because an item I produced was introduced on the BBC with a slanderous comment as an intro. I would not want you saddled with...."Here are some jottings from someone who describes the disorganised chaos of the RFA"...or something worse.


Sorry to be a prophet of doom but it is better to avoid damage than repair it.

Roger in France
Roger. Thanks for your advice. I shall relay (in my own words) your concerns to the RFA site people and listen to what they say.
Perhaps your concerns on this subject could be spread to the wider "audience" on the forum as many members will not be reading this exchange. It may help clarify "stuff" a bit. Up to you. Regards. Bryan.
Logged
Notes from a simple seaman
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 [20] 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32   Go Up